Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Rejecting Hogwarts Letter

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    TheCursedQuill
    Guest

    Rejecting Hogwarts Letter

    If a muggle born were to reject a letter from Hogwarts, do you think the Ministry would have to intervene?

    We know that young children can do magic without knowing it when their emotions run high, would this eventually stop once they reached a certain age? I was always under the impression that Hogwarts/a proper learning of magic, is what stopped those magical outburts. But if a muggle born rejected to be taught magic, they'd be going around all their life unable to stop themselves from making things blow up (like their evil aunt!)

    So if this is the case, do you think the ministry would step in, and if they did, what would they do? You can't force a person to attend Hogwarts... but it could also destroy their cover if they leave a muggle born unaware.

    Thoughts?

    -sarah

  2. #2
    Seventh Year Hufflepuff
    Am I in the Right House?
    AidaLuthien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    The City
    Posts
    570
    I also believe that schooling is what prevents continual outbursts of accidental magic.

    Of course, the kinds of accidents that untrained wizards and witches are able to perform tend to be pretty small. In fact, the Ministry seems to ignore what pre-11 year old Muggleborns are doing. ... which suggests, either they're incapable of doing anything that will ruin magical secrecy or the Ministry doesn't think they're capable of it.

    Harry doesn't blow up his aunt until after he's been at school for a year, which to me suggests that he's been getting stronger magically. His accidents before attending Hogwarts are relatively minor (as I recall).

    It's possible that a completely untrained witch or wizard will just continue to have small magical accidents and avoid being injured and that nothing particularly bad will happen.

    As far as forcing a Muggle-born to attend Hogwarts, it depends on how evil you think the government is, and what reasons the Muggle-born has for not wanting to attend school. I do think that British Ministry would try to use coercion rather than force, at least first. "Magic is amazing, see, ooo, pretty." or "We'll pay you off." or whatever else.

    The student would have to have very good reasons for not wanting to go: who wouldn't want to be magical? Which is why in my China story, the Muggle-born is a gymnast hoping to make the Olympics. She isn't happy about going to magic school at all.

    In the case of my student, if she had continued to reject going to school, the headmaster was prepared to force her to go, including casting Memory Charms on her parents and essentially kidnapping her. He has his reasons, but he considers it vitally necessary for her to go to school - regardless of what she wants. Also, in my version of magical China, the parents of Muggle-borns do not have much, if any, legal standing, and Muggle-borns don't have any until they're adults. It'd be like fighting a custody battle except that you have no legal rights to your child.

    There's no evidence for the British Ministry or the British magical legal system operating like this, but there's nothing that directly makes it impossible either.
    Stories Duels Poems Drabbles
    Proud Puff on MNFF and Slyth on Pottermore

    Banner by the awesome Minnabird Icon by wicked visions on LJ

  3. #3
    Tafka
    Guest
    I think it is possible that a student who refuses to go to Hogwarts would be required to show that they are receiving proper education in using their magic somewhere else, from a tutor or from a school in another country. I think it's quite probable that there is a bare minimum of "control" that a magical child is required to show before the ministry would allow them to discontinue their education, otherwise they would send the magical equivalent of a truancy officer after them.

    Alternatively the ministry could just monitor the muggle-born who chooses not to train their magic, and if they did too much accidental magic they may be fined, or rather, their parents would be fined, as they would be the ones responsible for their child.

  4. #4
    Ascendio
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Tafka View Post
    I think it is possible that a student who refuses to go to Hogwarts would be required to show that they are receiving proper education in using their magic somewhere else, from a tutor or from a school in another country. I think it's quite probable that there is a bare minimum of "control" that a magical child is required to show before the ministry would allow them to discontinue their education, otherwise they would send the magical equivalent of a truancy officer after them.

    Alternatively the ministry could just monitor the muggle-born who chooses not to train their magic, and if they did too much accidental magic they may be fined, or rather, their parents would be fined, as they would be the ones responsible for their child.
    I agree with this, and I think that they would definitely send in some sort of Ministry or school official to find the reasoning behind them not attending so they have a better understanding and can work out some sort of compromise,such as possible a tutor, going straight to the Muggle-born's house possibly?

  5. #5
    Half_BloodPrincess
    Guest
    I'd always imagined that Muggleborns didn't really have a choice. I'm reasonably sure that in Harry's first year Seamus mentions that his father is a Muggle, and that his mother being a witch was a bit of a 'nasty shock'. I can't imagine that his father would have been too pleased at letting his son disappear off into a different world. I'd say that Muggleborns would have to attend a magic school, if only to prevent them from revealing the Magical world to the Muggles.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •