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Thread: Being British XIV

  1. #51
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Um for children, Coco-Pops, Rice Krispies or Frosties.

    For adults, Special K, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, Cornflakes.

    If you google Kellogs, then you should be able to track down the British versions of cereals. We tend not to have the really highly coloured and extra sugary ones that are in the States. (Or perhaps I'm just very mean and don't buy them.)

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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equinox Chick View Post
    Um for children, Coco-Pops, Rice Krispies or Frosties.

    For adults, Special K, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, Cornflakes.

    If you google Kellogs, then you should be able to track down the British versions of cereals. We tend not to have the really highly coloured and extra sugary ones that are in the States. (Or perhaps I'm just very mean and don't buy them.)

    ~Carole~
    Okay, thanks a lot, Carole.
    Kindly disregard old posts by me. I was an irritating kid who didn't understand grammar.

  3. #53
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    This is awfully specific but... does anyone know some slang for gay people that Dumbledore would have known in his youth/teenage hood? Or should I make up some wizarding slang?
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  4. #54
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    Uhm well, I'm not that old. I would suggest you look at cockney rhyming slang (iron for iron hoof being one) or stick to something like 'queer'.

    Gay as a term for homosexual men didn't really come into common usage until much later, but 'gay' as a term for immorality was coined by Chaucer. A 'gay house' was a euphemism for a brothel.

    You might be best inventing something.

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  5. #55
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    Another (hopefully) quick question - do British people use pinewood for coffins? I was thinking of using the term "pinewood box" in lieu of coffin (feels more morbid and appropriate to the character's mood) but is that term very American/slightly Old Western?
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  6. #56
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    If you're talking about the same era, then no. Although these days coffins are generally more eco-friendly, I don't think pinewood would be used. Oak is more likely.

    ~Carole~
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  7. #57
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    I have two questions, both of which are quite stupid. (seriously, feel free to laugh at me).

    Firstly, in Britain, is the meal order breakfast-lunch-dinner or breakfast-dinner-supper? (Sorry, but I have to know.)

    Second, do you really have tea (like on a daily basis)? Is it for special occasions only? What would you eat at teatime?

    Thanks!

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  8. #58
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    Lily-it's breakfast, lunch, dinner. Except Christmas dinner, which is usually served between 3 and 4ish (I think/ that's how most families I know do it). Supper is like a small meal you have in the evenings, if you had a big lunch, say.

    Most brits drink tea or coffee on a daily basis. However afternoon tea is usually for special occasions/ a treat and is normally comprised of either crumpets, jam and tea, or scones, jam, cream and tea.
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  9. #59
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    Um, well, I sort of disagree here, because people call things by different names depending on background and regionality.

    Breakfast is a given. Then lunch (probably) then it can be either dinner, supper or tea.

    On the whole, I tend to think of 'dinner' as the main meal of the day. My kids will have a school dinner (at midday) unless they're taking in sandwiches in which case it's 'packed lunch.'

    I rarely call it supper - I think that's quite oldfashioned - but I cook 'tea' for my kids. Tea that Alex describes is 'high tea' at 4pm (ish). In reality the only people that have 'high tea' live at Downton Abbey.

    Sorry no definitive answer for you. I'd check the books and see what Harry and the others eat. I don;t think you can say anything is wrong, exactly, as long as you keep breakfast where it is and don't have lunch at 8pm.

    ~Carole~
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  10. #60
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    Please explain tea to me.

    Not the meal, though that's a bit baffling too.

    When I think of tea, I think of my wonderful assortment of loose-leaf glory in tins in my desk drawer that my co-workers make fun of me for (until they have a sore throat and I say, "I've got a tea for that!"). I've got oolong, assam, green, white, red, herbal. I have teas that flower in water and teas that you can steep all day and teas you want to take out of the water after three minutes. I have teas you want to add sugar to and teas you should leave virginal. I have spicy teas, fruity teas, bitter teas, sweet teas, smoky teas, minty teas. I love tea. (I've also typed the word "teas" enough times for me to think it is misspelled.)

    However, I get the distinct feeling that when you folks say "tea" you mean something ENTIRELY DIFFERENT. I just don't know how different.

    Please explain tea to me. Explain as though you would to a child. A very thick child.

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