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Thread: Being British XIV

  1. #11
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    welshdevondragon's Avatar
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    I don't know where you got the idea that Londoners didn't wear shorts in summer. They do, or some of them do. To be honest enough people wear different fashion styles that you can have them wear any Muggle clothes you want. My sister (i.e cool indie type) wears shorts with tights.
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  2. #12
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    I live near Newcastle (the Brits here will know what's coming next) and the girls wear shorts (or very short skirts) in December, never mind in the summer. These days fashions are universal.
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  3. #13
    sas__x
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    What people wear in Britain is really defined by their personalites. The indie types in my area tend to go to charities shops. They like bold patterns and tend to severly backcomb their hair and wear it in a messy bun on top of their heads (think nineties). Emo's (or scene kids) wear brands like drop dead. Their outfits are usually all black or too bright. They tend to wear skinny jeans, showing off their underwear and huge backpacks with the straps lowered so the bag bangs off their knees. Most boys/young men/tom boys wear joggers with a polo shirt and a jacket. Everything has to have an expensive brand lyle and scott or fila vintage are popular just now.

    Really, I think you can get away with most things. Especially in London, as someone with a kind of wacky outfit wouldn't really get looked at oddly. Well, I assume anyway.

    EDIT: Actually, what is really popular in summer are knee length, baggy, swim shorts. Usually bought from Primark and bright with huge patterns. Think tacky or neon.

    Oh, and I agree with Northumbrian. It can be the middle of January, and you will still see girls with barely anything on.

  4. #14
    Seventh Year Hufflepuff
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    In general, I think you can get away with anyone wearing anything... it more depends on their personalities. I have an American friend who refuses to wear shorts. On principle. What principle, I'm really not sure, but even though he comes from a place where it gets over 100 in the summer, he simply refuses to. It's either khakis or jeans for him, and only that. I, on the other hand, own about three dresses, none of which I wear with any frequency. If it's hot, I'll wear a skirt or shorts. I have one warm weather dress and I'm still not in the habit of wearing it. My other dresses are for formal occasions. Do Americans wear shorts and dresses? Yes. Do my friend and I? Not really.

    Though, as an American who has traveled a fair amount and is currently in London, I have to say, especially for men (I know your character is female but still) most people wearing shorts are tourists. And most of the girls wearing shorts have been wearing them with tights.

    It can be a question more of styling than anything else. Do people all over the world wear jeans? Yes. Italian men wear them much tighter than Americans (than anyone else in the world?) Japanese people wear them more destroyed than anyone else I've ever seen. Seriously. No one else would ever wear jeans that destroyed. It's absurd.

    I've noticed that my wardrobe (at least of what I brought) has a suspiciously high concentration of T-shirts from Threadless. Certainly tons of people are wearing T-shirts, but most of the women aren't wearing graphic T-shirts, and Threadless doesn't do much business in the UK, so I've seen no one wearing Threadless, though I run into a Threadless wearing person (occasionally the same item that I'm wearing on a particular day) essentially every day at my university town.

    The reason the tour books tell you things like don't wear shorts, is because they don't want you to stand out as a tourist from a hundred meters. I'm from a town that attracts a fair amount of tourists and I can usually tell them from a good hundred meters... which isn't necessarily a good thing.

    Basically, if you don't go into excruciating detail you'll be fine. Unless your Muggle-born character fancies herself a bit of a fashionista, I don't see the problem.
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  5. #15
    Serinah
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    I have several questions regarding British vocabulary.

    1) What slang words/phrases would a middle-class person use to say that someone has been or is in gaol? (Translation: what phrase would a Weasley use?)
    2) What slang words/phrases would a upper-class person use to say that someone has been or is in gaol? (Translation: what phrase would a Malfoy use?)
    3) Can you turn the noun 'gaol' into a verb 'gaoled' (dictionary doesn't have it as a word, but I don't really trust it), like you can do with 'jail' - 'jailed'?
    4) Or maybe the spelling 'gaol' is so outdated that I shouldn't really use it?
    5) Can I use the word 'drive way' for a road that's in front of a manor house? I started thinking that for me the word means something where you can drive a car, but I don't think that Malfoy Manor has ever seen a motor vehicle in front of it, so maybe I should use some other word?

    Thanks to whoever can help me,
    Serinah

  6. #16
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    1) What slang words/phrases would a middle-class person use to say that someone has been or is in gaol? (Translation: what phrase would a Weasley use?)
    Um, the person has 'done time' 'been inside' 'resident of Her Majesty' (they are Her Majesty's prisons, but obviously that's not applicable in the Magical world), 'banged up' is another one, but that's probably more working class. I can't see Molly saying it, although Ron might.

    2) What slang words/phrases would a upper-class person use to say that someone has been or is in gaol? (Translation: what phrase would a Malfoy use?)
    'resident of her Majesty' - again or 'been inside', 'been away'. I'm not upper class so I don't really know, though.
    3) Can you turn the noun 'gaol' into a verb 'gaoled' (dictionary doesn't have it as a word, but I don't really trust it), like you can do with 'jail' - 'jailed'?
    Not sure - but jailed is definitely a word and it's one we're more likely to use - or imprisoned.
    4) Or maybe the spelling 'gaol' is so outdated that I shouldn't really use it?
    Gaol always reminds me of old-fashioned highwaymen and things, but that could just be me. If I was writing I'd use jail or prison.

    5) Can I use the word 'drive way' for a road that's in front of a manor house? I started thinking that for me the word means something where you can drive a car, but I don't think that Malfoy Manor has ever seen a motor vehicle in front of it, so maybe I should use some other word?
    The bit in front of the house where you park the car is a 'drive' or 'driveway'. I agree the Malfoys probably wouldn't have one, but they would probably have a wide and impressive looking path leading up to the house.

    ~Carole~

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  7. #17
    Masquerade
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    Hi everyone, I was just wondering if a really posh family would would have a coffee table in their parlour. Or would it be a tea table? And what would they call dessert?

  8. #18
    Masquerade
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    Thank you to both of you for your replies!

    (Edit: Um...I think this is supposed to be post 20.)

  9. #19
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    welshdevondragon's Avatar
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    Umm.. well I'm not from a posh family but I've never heard of a tea table. It's a coffee table but coffee tables tend to be quite low. Dessert would be called dessert I think.
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  10. #20
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    I'm not posh, but according to the authority that is Jilly Cooper (author of Class and various sex and shopping type books set in Stately Homes), posh people (as in the aristocracy) call 'dessert' 'pudding' - even if it isn't actually a pudding. This sounds odd because pudding tends to be a term more associated with the working class, but I think when the middle classes tried to disassociate themselves from the working class and invented terms like 'dessert' and 'afters' the Upper class reverted back to pudding.

    ~Carole~ (who really should get out more)

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