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Thread: Being British XIV

  1. #21
    Black_Rose
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    Quote from Serinah
    2) What slang words/phrases would a upper-class person use to say that someone has been or is in gaol? (Translation: what phrase would a Malfoy use?)
    I believe a more appropriate term the upper class would use for this without sounding slightly... stupid would be 'serving a sentence'

  2. #22
    First Year Hufflepuff
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    My main character is muggle-raised for the first 11 years of her life, and I'm just covering all my bases and making sure I get the muggle british life down pat.

    Airports- are they all designed fairly similarly? I've been in way too many airports in my life, but they've all been in the US (except for one in Germany and one in Malta). Am I correct in assuming that british airports have pretty similar components to airports in the US? Are there any special terms which brits use in airports that never made it across the pond? Or are things like gate, terminal, baggage claim, runway, boarding zones, departures, arrivals, etc. the same? How tight/lax was security around 1998? How does security at a british airport compare to other airports? About average?

    In the US we have our Humane Societies which are no-kill animal shelters (alongside many other no-kills) as well as animal shelters that support euthanasia. Is the system similar in britain? Again, like I asked with the airplanes, is there any specific terminology common to the subject? Do animal shelters across the pond have similar businuess models and adoption/foster programs as those in the US?

    I'm an avid horseback rider here- I 'lease' my horse and keep him at a 'boarding facility'. We trail ride, do low level hunter/jumper shows, low level eventing, and we ride with the local hunt (though we chase coyotes and not foxes). I know the terminology across the pond in the horseback riding world is quite different, especially concerning showing and the levels at which one shows, so translating the first two sentences in this paragraph baffles me. English to spanish? No problem. American English to british? There just doesn't seem to be an answer, no matter how hard I google. Can anyone help me out with brit-specific equestrian terms? I know that there is currently a ban on foxhunting in the UK, but this comes after my character and does not affect her. Riding to hounds comes with it's own crazy set of terminology, but am I correct in assuming since many of the traditions in foxhunting here in the US came from jolly old England that much of the vocabulary is the same?
    Here, where I live, land is plentiful, horses are common, and though suburbia and the urban sprawl is encroaching, the US is just so massive that there is still a lot of room to breathe. Ar riding stable pressed for space in the UK? How common is trail riding? What are some of the major Hunts in the country? Is there a class stigma with riding? Here, just about everyone can afford a horse if they adjust the budget. Is it similar in the UK? Here, though it is traditionally thought of as being meant for the wealthy, any middle class bum and his pony can cap with the Hunt if they're turned out properly and can ride well enough. Is there a class stigma with riding to the hounds in the UK (or rather, was there in the 1990's)?

    Any help is much appreciated!

  3. #23
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    Are there any other terms that have the same general meaning as 'bloke'? I keep wanting to use the term 'guy' (he's a nice guy...), but that wouldn't be appropriate for 1960s/70s England, would it?

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  4. #24
    Black_Rose
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    Well Toni, it depends on who is saying it. Someone among the upper classes would be considered a 'charming man/gentleman' but for someone in the middle class, they'd be more considered as a 'nice fellow/generous chap' ('chap' would be more colloquial though)

  5. #25
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    You can say guy, but just don't overdo it. Someone like Lily, a Muggleborn, would have the influence of America and thus the word 'guy', and I can see Sirius using it thinking he's cool, but there are other words.

    If it's Mary MacD, for instance, talking about a bloke she liked, she might very well say 'nice boy'. If it's someone older they could say 'lad'.

    I think 'charming man' or 'fellow' are only likely if it's Lily's parents' generation.

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  6. #26
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    Thanks for the input! This isn't strictly necessary to anything I'm writing, I just came across it while I was trying to come to grips with one of my OCs. So, the exact phrase I'm wondering about now is from a male student about his male peers: "I know a lot of guys in my year have eyes for her..." It just struck me that it might not be something one would say. Does it sound off? Thanks!

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  7. #27
    Black_Rose
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    Oh for a quote like that, the term 'guy' would more than suffice. You've got to consider that language from the 60s/70s isn't exactly from another world :P But yes, that term seems valid in my opinion

  8. #28
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Marauder Time - late 70's - Fawlty Towers was a comedy that was hugely popular. Also drama series like Upstairs Downstairs. Coronation Street is a soap that continues to be popular. Crossroads - a now defunct soap opera was popular because it was so bad. Dr Who was legendary!

    80's - Eastenders (new soap opera), Brookside (soap). Then we fell in love with Australian soaps (Neighbours and Home and Away). The Bill was a police drama/soap going out twice a week with half hour episodes.

    90's - The Bill. All the soaps I mentioned above except Crossroads. Um, cookery shows became popular. Cracker was a cop show about a psychologist. Incredibly good and it had people talking. (starred Robbie Coltrane as well, not at all like Hagrid)


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  9. #29
    HARRYHARRYHARRYs_twin
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    I know that a lot of American programming is on British television, but what about a few decades ago? What are some decidedly British shows? I know of stuff that's on today, thanks to the internet and the BBC, but what would have been popular during Harry's or the Marauders' time? I'm most interested in programs that would be watched by teens or adults. Would there have been any shows that "everyone" watched?

    Thanks!

  10. #30
    Seventh Year Hufflepuff
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    I have a little British question.

    In the US, we say that we're "going to the beach." Do Brits go to the "beach" or to the "sea"?

    I feel like I've heard "going to the sea" in some kind of British context, so I'm just confused.
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