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Thread: Being British XIII

  1. #61
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    Random question:

    Is Jezza a common nickname for someone named Jeremy?

    Edit: Thanks Neil and Carole. I had thought it might just be Clarkson, but I stumbled across someone else (on the Internet) using "Jezza" as a username and they were clearly British, so thank you for satisfying my curiosity.
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  2. #62
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    First, the name is a “posh” one. A working class Jeremy is unheard of (certainly in my part of the world).
    I know two Jeremys, on gets called Jeremy, and nothing else. The other tells people who know him well to call him Jay.
    On a sample of two, my answer is, no. However, two isn’t a sample, it’s anecdotal evidence, and therefore worthless. (Sorry, I've just been watching a documentary on statistics and I don't feel capable of making a gewneral claim.)
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  3. #63
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    Aida - I've known a few Jeremys. One was 'posh' and we called him Jem, but another is a normal bloke from the South of England and we call him Jez or Jezza. Another was known as Jerry.

    It's the sort of name that does sound like an upper-class twit's name, but of the few I've known/met, only one was posh - the others weren't.

    There's a few TV presenters over here (Jeremy Paxman, Jeremy Vine, Jeremy Clarkson, Jeremy Bowen) and actors (Jeremy Brett, Jeremy Edwards, Jeremy Hardy). Whilst some were privately educated, it's not the same in every case (depending if you believe Wiki). Clarkson (as you probably know because I've seen you're a Hammond afficianado) is known as Jezza in a tongue in cheek way, the others seem to be 'Jeremy'.

    I'd say you could use Jezza as a nickname, but as Neil says it does largely depend which part of the country you're from.

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  4. #64
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    This talk about the Evans and Wales has made me curious – would Lily have an audible accent? Do Welsh people sound different from the South-English?
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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karaley Dargen
    This talk about the Evans and Wales has made me curious – would Lily have an audible accent? Do Welsh people sound different from the South-English?
    To your second question, yes, Welsh people have a distinct (and rather attractive-sounding!) accent. (Of course that remark is entirely my own opinion ) It is pretty different from South-English people. If you've watched the movie DH, Kara, Rufus Scrimgeour had a pretty heavy Welsh accent, so you could watch a bit with him in it to get a general idea. Or, better still, just YouTube "welsh accents" and I'm sure loads of stuff comes up

    As for Lily having an accent, well, in my Lily-world--if you know what I mean--Lily has a typical English accent, nothing posh, but when she gets angry the Welsh accent in her gets really strong. The same thing happens with me when I get angry; the Cockney accent comes out so much that you'd mistake me for a cast member in EastEnders! Sometimes people do weird things with their accent and it changes.

    It is possible that Lily could have a Welsh accent; maybe she was born in Wales. Maybe Spinner's End is in Wales, but I doubt it, so that leads me to the conclusion that even if Lily was born in Wales, she probably doesn't have a distinct accent because she moved to Spinner's End and is more likely to catch the accent from there--wherever that is. Having said that, I'm sure she had the occasional moment when she came out with a Welsh phrase or spoken with a Welsh accent (for example, they say "tuth" instead of "tooth") or something else because of her parents being Welsh, if they are Welsh.

    I hope that's answered your question! I only know this because I have relatives in Wales and I know quite a few people from there anyway, and their accents have always fascinated me.

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  6. #66
    Kitty
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    On the topic of accents: they can change really quite fast, especially in children. If you think Spinners' end is in a town in Wales, Lily would have a Welsh accent, wherever her parents were from. If she is there before she's 11, you wouldn't be able to tell within a couple of years. An even younger child can change accents in months, and their voice will adopt the accent they hear at school over their parents. Believe me - I have videos of my siblings and me as children.

    Although Evans is a Welsh name, do remember that many people have moved around the British Isles a lot over the course of history. My mum has an Irish surname, but we haven't found any Irish ancestors after about 1700, and her mother has a French surname, but we've no idea where that came from - the Normans, probably.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gmariam
    Can someone fill me in on Heathrow Airport?

    First of all, I'm assuming if Hermione wanted to fly to Australia, she would fly out of Heathrow.
    I know this was a couple of weeks ago, but I know all about this, so I thought I'd share.

    It is not possible to fly from london to Australia (whichever city you're going to there) in one go on a commercial flight. It has to stop somewhere to re-fuel, and you may have to change planes.

    British Airways and Qantas fly 'direct' from London to Sydney or Melbourne, where you stop in Singapore/ Bangkok (Syd)/ Hong Kong (Mel) and then get back on the same aeroplane. Other airlines like Singapore Airlines or Emirates will always make you change planes. It takes close to 24 hours to get to Sydney or Melbourne, a bit less to Perth.

    You'll always have to spend a night on the plane, but there are two possible timings - the 'day flight' that starts around 11am, landing in Australia the following evening local time - or the 'night flight' leaving at 9/10pm and arriving first thing in the morning two days later local time.

    I know some flight numbers - that have been the same for a very long time:

    QF2 (Qantas) London Heathrow - Bangkok - Sydney
    QF10 Heathrow - Singapore - Melbourne (night)
    QF30 (?) Heathrow - Hong Kong - Melbourne (day)
    BA11 (British Airways) Heathrow - Singapore - Sydney (night)

    and BA15 and SQ321 will get you as far as Singapore for the night flight. I can't remember any more.

    I don't know if any of that's useful, but there you go.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by babewithbrains

    It is possible that Lily could have a Welsh accent; maybe she was born in Wales. Maybe Spinner's End is in Wales, but I doubt it, so that leads me to the conclusion that even if Lily was born in Wales, she probably doesn't have a distinct accent because she moved to Spinner's End and is more likely to catch the accent from there--wherever that is.

    ~Soraya~
    From its description, Spinners End contains a series of old terraced (probably Victorian) properties. You can find that sort of streets almost anywhere. In Wales and Northern England I’d assume that they are in a mining town. The name, however, suggests spinning, so perhaps it’s a Lancashire Mill Town.

    Evans is somewhere in the top ten most common names in the UK, so they certainly don’t have to be Welsh. They aren’t as ubiquitous as the Smiths, but Jones and Evans are both common, and both Welsh. JKR likes common names. Brown is in the top ten, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kitty
    On the topic of accents: they can change really quite fast, especially in children. [SNIP]

    Although Evans is a Welsh name, do remember that many people have moved around the British Isles a lot over the course of history. My mum has an Irish surname, but we haven't found any Irish ancestors after about 1700, and her mother has a French surname, but we've no idea where that came from - the Normans, probably.
    My missus was born in Yorkshire and moved to the “real” north when she was just in her teens. Her accent is still identifiably Yorkshire. Her brother is two years younger, he has a Geordie accent.

    You’re right, most French surnames (and all surnames starting with Fitz) are Norman.

    -N-

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  8. #68
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    I have some questions about football. (And, yes, I mean what Americans like to call 'soccer'.) What are some popular teams? Rivalries? When is the season (like what months)? What is the atmosphere like at a match? Pretty much anything and everything you can or want to talk about will be great.
    Thanks!
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  9. #69
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    Ah football! How I love thee. Despite being female, I do understand the game (even the offside trap - in joke for the Brits on the board)

    Ayra here are some answers but I'm sure the other Brits on the board will furnish you with more information.

    Season - It seems to start earlier each year, but it's generally end of August until end of May when they have the F.A. Cup which is a knockout competition. After the F.A.Cup final there will now be play offs between clubs to see who'll get promoted the following season. But generally the season ends in May. The main competition is to win the league though, so each team will play home and away in a season and the team with the most points wins. There are three points for a win and one for a draw. In Scotland, I think they play each team more often though (not sure exactly)

    Our leagues are split between countries, so there are Emglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish leagues. In England there are 92 teams split into 4 leagues. (There are other minor leagues but stick with these four for now)

    The top league is called The Premier League, then The Championship, then League One, then finally League two. (This does depend on era, though. In Marauder times it was plain old Division 1 down to Division 4)

    Rivalries - In London the main rivalry is probably Tottenham Hotspur/Arsenal. They play in North London. The rivalry is long and established. Between the clubs it's moderately friendly (although fierce), but the fans dislike each other and if a player moves from one club to another he'll be barracked forever more. (I'm a Spurs fan, btw)

    Other rivalries are Manchester Utd/Liverpool. This is unusual (ish) because you'd think their main rivals would be the teams they share a city with (Manchester Utd/Manchester City and Liverpool/Everton). Whilst the rivalries between the home city clubs are there, they're not as fierce. In the same context the rivalry between Leeds and Manchester Utd is also pretty bitter.


    The atmosphere at a match can be intense, compelling, dispiriting, boring or downright scary. I've been to matches where the swearing is unbelievable (and there are a lot of kids there), where the racism by the fans is terrifying and you can see the tempers rising like a pressure cooker. Equally, I've been to matches where the camaraderie is high, the singing is funny, and the banter between the fans is uplifting.

    Onto singing. There is a lot of singing and chanting in the British games. We make up songs (usually pretty bad ones) about players, teams, officials and sing them all match long.

    It's addictive.

    ~Carole~
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  10. #70
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    When your team wins, the atmosphere is electric, as I'm sure you've guessed. At the beginning of the game, I think the atmosphere depends on the size of the statium and who you're playing. I used to support a small, lower division club, and when I went to Old Trafford to watch Manchester Utd, there was a massive difference in the atmosphere before the game, probably due to the size and the fame of the club.

    Throughout the game, as Carole says, there's a lot of singing and chanting, though I would get smited by the mods if I posted any on here. Fans also like to insult the referee, as well as opposing players and opposite fans. Things can get pretty nast fairly easily, and England is unforntunately infamous for it's football hooligans. However, fans can be pretty nice to each other. Granted I supported a club which was known for it's easy going fans, but we always chatted with fans of the opposing teams with a bit of friendly banter going back and forth. Some teams, however, are known for their violent fans, the main ones being Millwall and Leeds, who, unfortunately, are also big rivals. I live in Leeds and it's always advisable to keep away from the town centre on the day when Leeds play Millwall at home.

    The big teams depends on the era you're writing in. Now, it would be teams like Manchester United, Chelsea and Arsenal, Liverpool when they're doing well, and then other teams like Tottenham Hotspur (Spurs), Aston Villa, Everton and Manchester City. Leeds United used to be a very big and famous team in the 60s and 70s, and competing for places in Europe in the 90s and early 2000s until their fall from grace. West Ham also used to be quite a big team in the 60s with three of the England team of '66 coming from the club.

    The World Cup is a major event here in England. People hang the flag of St George everywhere they can, and some even paint the side of the houses or entire living rooms with the red and white cross. Pubs are granted special licenses to open early for the games (7 in the morning when it was held in Japan), and some companies give employers the afternoon (or morning) off work to watch the match. My school used to set up a big screen in the hall and pupils could come in early to watch, and lessons wouldn't start until the game was over. It's all anyone talks about for weeks. There are usually songs released supporting the England team, and everyone is optimistic that, despite the faliures of the past, this year will be our year. It never is

    Sarah x


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