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Thread: Being British XIII

  1. #41
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Can someone fill me in on Heathrow Airport?

    First of all, I'm assuming if Hermione wanted to fly to Australia, she would fly out of Heathrow. Is it far from London? Is there a drop off for departures? Are cars shooed away like they are here in the States? Or do you have to park to drop someone off?

    I fly in and out of O'Hare several times a year, and we have to stand in line to check-in for flight/luggage before going through security - would it be the same for an international trip out of Heathrow? The year is about 2002 so I'm assuming there would be increased security.

    What are some terms I need to be aware of? Like - is the line to check-in the 'queue' or just a line? Do couples go on 'honeymoons' or take some other kind of trip? Do you carry luggage, suitcases, or trunks? I'm just looking for the proper terms here. I'm sure I'll need more so if you think of any others, please throw them at me.

    Thanks for helping out a woefully inexperienced international traveler!

    ~Gina

  2. #42
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    My dad is an airport nerd, flying in and out of Heathrow at least once a week, so I can help here.

    There are four airports in and around London; Heathrow, Gatwick, Stanstead, and London Luton. Heathrow is the main one, and it's in Housnlow, which is sort of south-west London. Gatwick, Stansted and Luton are furthur away. My airport nerd of a father says that yes, Heathrow do fly to Australia, and he even said if it's British Ariways, Hermione would need Terminal 5, and Quantas would be Terminal 3. Actually, it's just occured to me that Terminal 5 wouldn't have been built in 2002, so I'm not sure which terminal it would have been, and my dad's gone now.

    I've flown out of three different airports in the US, and the procedure for check-in and security is the same as it is in Heathrow, or any other airport worldwide, to be honest. We call it queueing for check-in, rather than waiting in line, we carry luggage, suitcases, bags or baggage. Baggage is more the formal one that they use at the airports, so I'd recommend bags or luggage. Couples do go on honeymoons.

    Hope this helps!

    Sarah x


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  3. #43
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    First of all, I'm assuming if Hermione wanted to fly to Australia, she would fly out of Heathrow.
    You assume correctly.

    Is it far from London?
    That depends which part of London and how you're getting there. From my stamping ground, it takes roughly an hour to drive there on a good day. (That's South London). It might take longer if you live in the centre cause of the traffic.

    Is there a drop off for departures? Are cars shooed away like they are here in the States? Or do you have to park to drop someone off?
    Uhm, now this might have changed recently because of terrorist threats but I think for the year you're writing (2003 ish?) then you could drop someone off at departures and then scoot off. You get about 10 minutes to offload someone - at least you did in 2006 when I went to Aus.

    Queue is probably better than line.

    We do say check-in. Um, we 'check-in suitcases or luggage' not trunks.

    Newlyweds go on a 'honeymoon' (and try to get upgrades ...)

    There are usually several queues for the same destination. You can be guaranteed that the one you join will always move slower than the others. All members of the family have to be present so you can check in because they want to see their faces on the passports. Which means the queue is always chock-a-block with families.

    In the year you're talking about you could still carry liquids on the flight. These days you can't carry more than 100ml.

    I'm going onto random tangents now. If I think of anything else I'll edit in, or you can poke me.

    Heathrow, by the way, is a hideous airport. VERY busy and it's always worse arriving and trying to reclaim your luggage -but that probably isn't relevant to your story.

    ~Carole~

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  4. #44
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Thank you so much, Carole and Sarah! I really appreciate your help. I'm glad you mentioned passports, Carole, because Hermione would certainly need one of those. I didn't think of it since I don't have one myself.
    I may have to move my other questions elsewhere, since Hermione got on the plane and I think Ron wants to follow her...

    Thanks!
    ~Gina

  5. #45
    Midnight Storm
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    Hope I'm not offending any British people with this question...

    Is the term 'Brit' derogatory?

    Thanks!
    ~Midnight Storm

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Storm
    Is the term 'Brit' derogatory?
    You're not offending any British people, no. And as far as I know, "Brit" is not derogatory, as I use it myself to refer to me and other people who are British. It's just an abbreviation. It's not like the shortened form of "Pakistani" (I hope you can guess what I mean) which is used offensively. "Brit" is simply a quick way of saying "British person" and "Brits" is a quick way of referring to "British people". I hope I've helped!

    ~Soraya~

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  7. #47
    Midnight Storm
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    Ah, thank you, Soroya! I just wanted to make sure it wasn't, before I started chucking it all over my fic

    ~Midnight Storm

  8. #48
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    No problem, Midnight Storm. I'm glad I could help

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    Keep calm and carry on my wayward son.

  9. #49
    Midnight Storm
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    Ah, it's Midnight Storm here -- again. I'm making Australia look bad, aren't I? I assure you, we're not all ignorant. I think I just need to listen in Geog more.

    Anyway, I need the facts on British (preferably Scotland -- Hogwarts, y'know?) weather.

    The questions:

    When I was in Britain, the sun was setting by, like, 3 p.m. or something. So, what time does the set each season? (I'm assuming it rotates, or something?)

    Snow in Britain during winter is normal, yes? When does it usually start? (Late/early December? January?) Also, how cold does it need to be?

    How hot does it get in Summer? And What sort of heat? (Humid? Dry? Both?)

    Now, this is a strange one, but could somebody please give me an example of the temperature and weather of a 'normal' Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring day?

    Oh, and what scale do you use? That probably should have been the first question, but oh well. I don't mind which scale you answer in (I can use an online converter if you reply in Farenheit[sp?]), but can you please say what scale you are answering in?


    Thanks so, so much in advance!
    ~Midnight Storm

  10. #50
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    AH don't worry Midnight Storm- the weather is a British obsession.

    So, what time does the set each season?

    In winter, yes, about three ish sounds right. In Summer it sets more like nine ish, getting properly dark by ten. Bear in mind that in Scotland it gets dark much later. I was outside at I think eleven p.m and it was still light but that was in the middle of summer.

    Snow in Britain during winter is normal, yes? When does it usually start? (Late/early December? January?) Also, how cold does it need to be?

    You have (unintentionally I'm sure) touched on a bit of a sore point here. Snow is not normal in Britain. I'm nineteen and I've had I think two white Christmases. That is why when it does snow all the cars are unprepared for it/ there is not enough grit for the roads etc. However for the past three years it's snowed. Often slightly in December and January though last year there was a big snowfall in february and this year it snowed heavily in late November. Bear in mind Britain, for quite a small country, has lots of variation regionally. I'm sure the Met Office website could get you a more complete idea for the weather in the specific part of Britain you're looking at.

    It needs to be freezing to snow. I think the warmest it was when there was snow, and it wasn't thawing, was about 5 or 6 degrees Celsius?

    what scale do you use?

    I've always used celsius. But I've heard people use Fahrenheit.

    an example of the temperature and weather of a 'normal' Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring day?


    I'm pretty sure I can't link but type 'met office uk climate summaries' into google and the first link will give you all the details. Hope that helps/ is broadly accurate!
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