Page 16 of 18 FirstFirst ... 61415161718 LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 174

Thread: Being British XIII

  1. #151
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
    Obliviate!
    Sapphire at Dawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Here, there and everywhere
    Posts
    776
    Marauder fifth year, but the girl is a year younger, so she's fourteen. So that'd be... 75-6? Or 74-5. I'm terrible with dates. At the moment, she's wearing a flowery dress and a brown cardigan. Would that be suffifiently frumpy for James to not want to go on the date with her?

    Sarah x


    Wonderful avvie by psijupiter. Totally brilliant and amazing banner by Julia/the opaleye!

  2. #152
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
    Obliviate!
    Sapphire at Dawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Here, there and everywhere
    Posts
    776
    Good point about the Muggle clothes. I'll have a re-think. Thanks Carole and Neil.

    Sarah x


    Wonderful avvie by psijupiter. Totally brilliant and amazing banner by Julia/the opaleye!

  3. #153
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
    Kill the Spare
    Equinox Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    using rare and complicated words
    Posts
    2,991
    Uh, Sarah, what particular part of Marauder era? Fashions changed rapidly.

    If this is late 1970's (say 1978) then it would be seriously uncool to be wearing flared high waisted trousers, wide lapelled shirts or flowery flowing skirts.

    1976-77 was the start of punk rock, and trousers were suddenly much much tighter and adorned with safety pins and studded leather belts.

    As far as the hair goes. Centre partings were quite early seventies, later it would have been short and spiky - or those really awful footballer perms (think Kevin Keegan)

    ~Carole~

    Banner by the fabulous Julia - theoplaeye

  4. #154
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
    Kill the Spare
    Equinox Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    using rare and complicated words
    Posts
    2,991
    oops post nargles ...

    Um, would James be that bothered by Muggle clothes? It does sound frumpy, but a lot of the seventies clothes did look a bit frumpy, in my opinion.

    If you made the colours really boring and not suiting her colouring (like greys or navy or brown) then he could look at her whatever she's wearing and think 'frump'.

    And yeah, it's 75-76. That is still the hippy type phase ...although summer 76 was when things changed.

    Banner by the fabulous Julia - theoplaeye

  5. #155
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
    Hatching Dragon's Eggs
    Northumbrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    261
    The BBC website still has the "Life on Mars" site available and it contains a lot of 1970's pop culture stuff. It was set early seventies (I think) and it looks to me that everything was beige.

    Earls seventies Glam Rock (Sweet, Mud and the man we can no longer talk about *cough*Gary Glitter *cough*) were all big until the Sex Pistols and the Clash and the Damned made their mark. Things changed, especially fashions, but the UK was still being bombed by the IRA.

    Flowery dress and brown cardgan sounds fashionable to me! But James probably wouldn't know that anyway.

    Neil

    First Competition Banner I've won. For: Killers

  6. #156
    eyeofthetiger
    Guest
    Hey everyone! I have a quick question. What would be considered a small town over there? What is the name of a small town in England?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dani

  7. #157
    Sixth Year Hufflepuff
    You Need Some Driving Lessons, Ron
    Weasley Mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    489
    Perhaps someone can answer my question when they address Dani's.

    Considering the Weasley family and how close they all are, do you think the next gen kids would address their aunts and uncles as, say, "Aunt Hermione" when speaking directly to her, or just "Hermione"? Here in the U.S. this varies greatly depending on where you live and even by individual family. Just wondering what would be typical over there, and what you imagine it might be like for the Weasleys. And in particular, between R&H and H&G's kids. For example, would a 20 year old Hugo call Harry by his first name or Uncle Harry? (Assuming a pretty close family relationship)

    Thanks!
    Avatar by Annalise
    Seriously cool banner by Julia

  8. #158
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
    Kill the Spare
    Equinox Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    using rare and complicated words
    Posts
    2,991
    Lori - My nieces and nephews call me Carole because I said I didn't want to be called Aunt or Aunty. That had to do with the fact that one of them is only seven years younger than me, so 'Aunt' makes me sound as if I should have a rug over my knees.
    I think the Weasley grandchildren may well call their aunts and uncles by the title (because they are a traditional family) but then change when they came of age, perhaps.
    So, twenty-year-old Hugo may well call Harry by his name only, but I think you can argue it either way.

    eyeofthetiger - We have a lot of small towns. It's hard to name just one and it depends where you want the town to be and what era. For instance, a town I once lived in was 'small' at the beginning of the 80's but is now an urban sprawl of a town so isn't small. If you give us an idea where you want it to be (North of England, East, Nr Wales, Cornwall, near London etc etc) or who lives near the town (is it near the Weasley's village for instance then I might have a better idea.

    ~Carole~

    Banner by the fabulous Julia - theoplaeye

  9. #159
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
    Hatching Dragon's Eggs
    Northumbrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    261
    Lori
    I tend to agree with Carole. The Weasley family are very traditional I’m pretty sure that the kids will say “aunt Hermione” when they are young, but it may change. You could go either way, you could even mix and match. My missus still calls her uncles “uncle” but I just call them by their forename.

    Dani
    There is no clear definition of the words town and village in the UK.
    Cities are easy. A city has a royal charter granting it city status. Until the 16th century, a town was recognised as a city by the English Crown if it had a diocesan cathedral within its limits. These days the Queen occasionally grants city status. Some UK cities are tiny, because they were unaffected by population growth during the Industrial Revolution (Wells has a population of about 10,000)
    Towns were settlements which had a “mayor and corporation”, but I think that definition stopped when parliament rid of the rotten boroughs in the 1830’s (don’t quote me on that). These days any large settlement that isn’t a city calls itself a town. Winchelsea (one of the Cinque Ports on the south coast) claims to be the smallest town in England (population less than 1,000 I think).
    As Carole says, tell us where and we’ll be able to find you a small town.

    -N-

    First Competition Banner I've won. For: Killers

  10. #160
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
    Hatching Dragon's Eggs
    Northumbrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    261
    Hi
    Ottery St. Catchpole is a fictional town, but most folk reckon that it is really Ottery St Mary, in Devon. It’s in the south west, and JKR was (arguably) from the greater south west, too (Gloucestershire). I’d simply google the area and look for names (there are not many large towns or cities in that part of England).
    You could always make up a name, JKR did. I tend to use real places, but there’s no reason why you can’t invent a place, so long as it sounds right (although to be honest, “Little Whinging” is a bit of a stretch for a place name).
    I’ve always assumed that Little Whinging is near Guildford and that Hermione is a Home Counties girl. I chose a village near Winchester for her. But, basically, they are all southerners.
    There are a lot of places called ---ton and ---bury in that part of the country, and several other suffixes you could use: ---church, ---ford, ---bridge, ---mouth, ---minster and ---ham are all common. It isn’t difficult to figure out the etymology of place names (Exmouth is on the coast, and the mouth of the River Ex. Exeter is on the same river.
    ---borough is fine in that part of the world, but it is southern, as you travel north it becomes ---brough and eventually ---burgh (same pronunciation, but you didn’t need to know that).
    -N-

    First Competition Banner I've won. For: Killers

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •