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Thread: Being British XIII

  1. #101
    Sailing Girl
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    About the weather- We have family in Scotland, and they are usually wearing thin(ish) waterproof jackets with a jumper and a shirt in very late August. They haven't resorted to waterproof trousers quite yet when I see them (v. late August), so by early September, they proably haven't got them out yet. I'd say a Scot would be in full wet-weather regalia by late September, but some years I'm sure they've had to bring out the umbrellas earlier.

    About 'haven't the foggiest'- I use it sarcastically, and so do most people I know. I don't know of anyone who uses it in the proper sense, but I'm sure there are.

  2. #102
    Sertil
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    Hi, I was wondering, are there any common (or fairly common) ways to say "you'll be in trouble" besides, well, that? As in, are there any figures of speech/idioms or something?
    Thanks!
    -Cory

  3. #103
    Fourth Year Gryffindor
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    Okay, I know this has probably been discussed in every Being British thread since the beginning of MNFFBB, but I need clarification.

    I believe that Brits use the word fit in much the way we Americans use hot, for physical attractiveness. What I need to know is would it be redundant to say someone was fit and good-looking/handsome?

    When we (Americans) say someone is hot, it usually encompasses the whole package and I may be confused because of the term physically fit. A person here can be fit and still not have a very attractive face (ugly as that sounds, ) in which case one would say something like he/she's got a smokin hot bod, but probably not say the general he/she's hot.

    Please clarify.

  4. #104
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    moonymaniac - Uh ... largely depends on era. The term 'fit' would not have been used by the Marauders unless they meant physically fit. It started being used in late 80's in UK.
    I think we use it as the overall package, so the person in question needs to have a good figure and face to be 'fit'. I could be wrong though.

    Sertil - 'you'll be for it' or 'you'll catch it when Dad (or whoever) finds out' 'you're dead meat!' Depends on era. I can't see Sirius et al saying 'you'll be dead meat,' but Ron probably would.

    ~Carole~
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  5. #105
    Fourth Year Gryffindor
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    Thanks, Carole. That actually works best anyway.

    I have another question that I meant to include with that one and then forgot. *oldbraincells*

    Do the British have a term equivalent to our use of jail bait, used to describe an underage person in a relationship with an adult? Or is that one used, and would it be in Marauder era? In the story someone uses it to say someone is NOT jail bait, for the record. story really isn't as cheesy as it sounds. >.<

  6. #106
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Right - first off, the age of consent in this country is sixteen (if you're talking about a hetrosexual relationship). It doesn't matter if your partner is seventeen, twenty-seven or fifty-seven, as long as the youngest person is over fifteen then no offence has been committed.

    So ... the term jail bait in your story may be redundant.

    However ... we do use (and did use) the term cradle snatcher to apply to the older person. It's less emotive than jail bait, but is still something that you could use to make fun of someone. I don;t think the term jail bait was around in the 70's. I certainly don;t remember hearing it until the 90's.

    ~Carole~
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

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  7. #107
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    What would be an example of something you'd eat for a casual summer dinner in England? Do would you have hot dogs and hamburgers with ketchup like we would in the states?

    Thanks,
    -Meg

  8. #108
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Where is this taking place? Restaurant or at home? We do have hot dogs and burgers etc, but personally, I only have them when I go out to a restaurant. Other families are probably different to mine, but a casual dinner at home would be something like lasagne, pasta bake, chicken stir fry, casserole (perhaps not this in summer) etc. But if you had your characters eating a burger or hot dog, I don't think I'd see anything wrong with it. They might have been less common as something to have at home in the Marauder Era though. but I'm not sure on this.

    Sarah x


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  9. #109
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    I feed my kids burgers at home, but I wouldn't do it as a family meal, mainly because I'm not keen on burgers, and it's more of a TV dinner meal.

    You mentioned summer, so you could always make it a barbecue (not in 70's or early 80's though)

    There's always quiche and salad.

    As Sarah says, era is all important. We didn't get Wimpy in this country until mid-seventies. You could buy frozen burgers though and frankfurter sausages in a tin.

    If you want something like a takeaway, then in the seventies it would be fish and chips or pie and mash. Chinese takeaways were becoming popular as were curry houses.

    ~Carole~
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

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  10. #110
    Sixth Year Hufflepuff
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    Okay, I'm very curious: what is pie and mash?

    And a question of my own. I am writing a student returning to Hogwarts for her final year, and want to have one of her parents cook breakfast. It's not fancy, just more than what this fairly-simple family would have on a regular morning. Here, I would write that he was making pancakes, or maybe bacon and eggs... what would be a good British equivilent?

    Thanks!
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