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Thread: Being British XII

  1. #41
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    I've never heard it. Bear in mind that ass is NOT a rude word, it's another word for donkey and a sily-ass is an upper class twit. I've never heard the UK equivalent expression hard-arse (can I say that?) used either.

    "Little Hitler" or "Jobsworth" are used to describe people who apply rules rigidly. The first is obvious, the second possibly less so. "It's more that my job's worth to let you park there mate."

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  2. #42
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    I've actually never heard 'Little Hitler' or 'Jobsworth' being used, but I know we don't use 'hard-ass'. I'd say perhaps use the word 'tight' if the person has prevented someone from doing something, e.g. if mum says you can't go out and play it'd be 'oh, that's so tight!'

    I can't actually think of a word that we'd use specifically, all I can think of is saying 'so-and-so's such a rule biding *insert insult here*'

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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weasley Mom
    Please pardon my language for one moment as I ask if you use the word "hard-ass" (strict, rule-abiding, not flexible) over there?
    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian
    I've never heard the UK equivalent expression hard-arse (can I say that?) used either.
    We use hard-arse in the South of the country (well I do) but tight-arse or just tight are more likely to be used. Although that's probably more for someone who is incapable of having fun rather than a rule setter.

    Jobsworth is a common expression, although possibly not one used much these days. Depends, as always, on the era you're writing.

    We wouldn't say 'ass' unless we're being heavily American Ironic.
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  4. #44
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    This is helpful, so thanks to all of you. I think I will just use "tight" and leave it at that. I was hoping for something a little ruder, but it will work. Thanks again!
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  5. #45
    bebe10
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    In my area, people just call it a black eye, and we say holiday home or second home. Some people might use the term, but I've never heard anybody say hard-ass - but I can't think of an alternative! So that's not very helpful, sorry!

    Maybe uptight?

    Ooh, self-righteous! Not very rude, but I can't think of anything else.

  6. #46
    HARRYHARRYHARRYs_twin
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    Quick question:

    So I'm writing a fic which, for the first part, focuses in on a couple of children. I'd say they're a bit older than the Marauders, maybe five to ten years their elder. So I was wondering, what were some popular kid's games back in that era? At this point the boy and girl are around six or seven, and attend state (er, by that I mean their parents have to pay for tuition. I think that's the correct term) school. I'm thinking things like tig, hide-and-go-seek, and blind man's buff, but are there any particular games that are of that sort that would be more popular?

    Thank you,
    --Selina

  7. #47
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    Let me get this right (I hope I have).

    These kids are 5-10 years older than the Marauders: so they were born 1950-55

    They are about six or seven, so it’s 1957 – 1962.

    The games you’ve chosen are good, the boys will also be playing any variety of football (that's soccer to you) based games. There was one (called “spot” I think) where the boys would run up and kick the football off a wall at an angle and another player had to intercept it and do the same. Football and cricket would be popular too tought at that age football is just a bunch of kids chasing the ball. Girls played bouncing and catching games with tennis ball sized balls (names - no idea, sorry).

    Fee-paying schools are “Public Schools”. At that age the kids would be at “Prep School”.

    State Schools are state funded and free to all and at that age the kids would be at Infant School.

    In the Muggle world 1957-62 is the era of CND (the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament), Sputnik, Yuri Gagarin and the beginnings of space race and everyone wanted to be a cosmonaut (or astronaut). It was also the time that the US was exporting something called Rock and Roll.

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  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by HarryHarryHarry'stwin
    I'm thinking things like tig, hide-and-go-seek, and blind man's buff, but are there any particular games that are of that sort that would be more popular
    All good games, but 'tig' in my part of the country (London and the South of England) was always called 'it' and we said 'hide and seek' - not 'go seek'. Another very popular game that I played (although later than your era, I'm sure everyone played it) was a variation on hide and seek called sardines.

    One person would hide and the rest would look. If you found the person then you hid with them. This meant by the end of the game, everyone was squashed together like a tin of sardines. The game ends when the last person finds everyone and they all shout 'Sardines!'

    Wow, that would be a great game to play at Grimmauld Place ...
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  9. #49
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Public schools are really prestigious Private schools. If your school is just a run of the mill fee paying school then it would be called Private, but if it was a incredibly good and rather posh schools (and rather more expensive!), it would be a Public school (I went to a sixth form in a town where there was a fair bit of rivalry between the two Private schools and the Public school).

    A game we used to play in Primary school was British Bulldog. Everyone stood at opposite ends of the playground, except one person who stood in the middle. Then someone would shout 'British Bulldog 1 2 3!', and everyone would run to the opposite end of the playground while the person in the middle had to try and catch them. If you were caught then you had to help catch more people, and the game would go on until there was only one person left. Then you'd start over again. It was a bit dangerous; I tore a ligament in my thumb playing this game when I was ten or so, and it was banned because we kept charging into the little kids and making them cry.

    Sarah x


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  10. #50
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    I'm so not British, but I'll try to be helpful, Selina.

    Are they Muggle children, Muggle-born children, or are they raised with wizarding families? If they were wizard children, perhaps they could have toy broomsticks. Harry had one at age 1, so it's not unreasonable to assume that 5-7 year-olds would have toy brooms, as well. That also means that they could play a kids' version of Quidditch.

    Plus, if they are wizarding children, then you could completely fabricate a game, using your knowledge of magic, and create something totally unique. That would open up your options greatly.
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