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Thread: Being British XII

  1. #11
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Kedgeree - which is rice, eggs and smoked haddock. I had it for breakfast at the Savoy hotel (on my honeymoon )

    Or something like smoked salmon and scrambled egg. Freshly squeezed juice, proper coffee ...

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  2. #12
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weasley Mom
    Speaking of breakfast... I'm looking for a (pretentious?) breakfast food that would be common for Brits, particularly at the table of the wealthy. Any ideas?
    Full English breakfast is a monster of a meal.

    Cereal, milk or yoghurt, fruit juice and fresh fruit.

    Toast with butter jam and marmalade.

    Eggs (fried, scrambled and poached), bacon, sausages, fried tomatoes, mushrooms, black pudding (that’s a sausage made out of congealed blood), baked beans (a modern addition). The Scots have something called white pudding, too (never ask for a full English breakfast in Scotland, ask for a full Scottish breakfast or else!) I have no idea what a white pudding is and I’ve never dared ask. I think (hope) that it’s some form of oatcake.

    You could read PG Wodehouse or Dorothy L Sayers for descriptions of upper class breakfasts. They are heart-attack specials (even more than above). From memory add porridge, grilled kidneys (and possibly liver), kippers, poached salmon to the above list. Haggis, too, possibly.

    Kippers are smoked herring, my Dad liked kippers for breakfast as a treat. They stank the house out.

    Neil

    ps I’d forgotten Kedgeree. But my honeymoon was in Paris so was restricted to croissants, cheese and French coffee.

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  3. #13
    Sixth Year Hufflepuff
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    That info is so great, but I think I should be more specific so you both can help me narrow it down. It needs to be something a teenage Rose Weasley would expect the Malfoys to eat at breakfast on a normal day. In other words, she needs to have heard of it, even if it's not something she knows from the Burrow. Also, the fewer words the better... my drabble is already stretched to the breaking point on words.

    I so appreciate your help! Sorry I wasn't more specific the first time around.
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  4. #14
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    I suggest kedgeree, smoked salmon, or kippers.

    Neil

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  5. #15
    jubjub15
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    I think Smoked salmon and scrambled eggs...or Eggs Benedict (poached eggs with sauce on english muffins) , thats quite a posh breakfast

  6. #16
    HARRYHARRYHARRYs_twin
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    Thank you all for your responses -- I wasn't expecting assistance so quick.

    Don't worry -- no pancakes in this story (I've never liked them much, anyway).I think I'm going to end up describing the stuff as 'a syrupy mess', which makes it possible for any number of different substances. It is during breakfast, so in my mind it's going to be honey.

    Ah, it seems like you English take the mickey out of accents more than I do. I think I'll end up sticking with what I have in that department, making him sound somewhat like Hagrid, as they only other one I know somewhat well is Cockney, and all the slang and other words used would confuse me too much to be writing it often. But would anyone look at this quote and see if it's kosher in the dialect? It's probably a complete mess, but that's what I get for being from the States. Oh, and if it looks like some other dialect completely, let me know. Knowing where my character's from may be a good idea, no matter how minor he is.

    “When did he ever say that, Althea? When? You just assumed, and as my mum always says --”
    “’Ay, none ‘a us want to hear another one’a ‘er sayings. They’re stupid.”
    “Don’t insult my mum! You don’t even know her!”
    “Wha’s yer point?”
    Oh, and another thing -- I have these foods being eaten during breakfast: toast, kippers, bacon, and hash. Are these all eaten for breakfast in the UK? I'm pretty sure they all are, but just to double check, or see if there are more common names for them (I'm mostly talking about the hash for this last bit).
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  7. #17
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    They are all on my monster breakfast list (above), except hash. What is hash? The only hash I know is corned beef hash, which is a mix of mashed potatoes and corn beef, fried.

    Neil

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  8. #18
    psijupiter
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    Hash browns? They are a potato-y type thing. (As a veggie, they are somehting I get for full English breakfasts quite alot!) They might be at breakfast, though I don't think they are part of the traditional English breakfast, and Hogwarts seems very traditional in its food. I might pick something else off the list Neil had instead.

    By the way, white pudding is black pudding but without the blood (it does have oatmeal in it, but I'm fairly sure black pudding does too.) It is apparently part of the Irish breakfast - in Scotland it is sold in fish and chip shops (along with red pudding.)

  9. #19
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    From what I've seen hash browns are part of a full English. They may not be traditional, but they're part of the breakfasts in most hotels and on menus at resturants and stuff.

    As for the accent, in that extract it sometimes gets a bit hard to read, so while he may have that accent, I'd caution you against using it all the time. Perhaps he could slip back into it when he's angry or something? I know I slip back into mine sometimes (usually after I've had cider), and I think that might be better than typing out his accent all the time.

    "’Ay, none ‘a us want to hear another one’a ‘er sayings. They’re stupid.”

    If your going for a Hagrid type accent, I'd make this 'None of us wants to hear another one o' her sayins. They're stupid.' and the next one 'What's yer point?'

    The 'aye' is said in the South West, but only by older people, it isn't common for young people to use it. It means yes. The use of 'a' makes it seem more northern and awkward in the sentence.

    If you want 'insults' for that type of accent, lots of people say 'ooh arrrr' to me (think pirate style), or call me 'farmer'. Sometimes they sings songs by a band called the Wurzles, who have really, really heavy Westcountry accents. If you want an idea of what the stereotypical accent sounds like, listen to them. It's rather cringeworthy music though, so be warned! There's also a character in the TV programme 'Little Britain' called Vicky Pollard. Her accent sounds like it comes from Bristol, which is a city in the southwest, and sometimes I get quotes from her repeated at me. Though I have to stress that all this is done in good humour, and I usually play along and tease theirs as well. It is rather a comedy accent, and I've never had anything bad said to me because of it.

    Hope all that helps.

    Sarah x


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  10. #20
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Odd question, and I'm not sure if anyone can help me with this..


    In the RAF, how old would someone usually be when they are made Air Commodore, or alternatively Wing Commander? Also, when you have an officer rank in the RAF, when do you "retire" and do you get a pension?

    I did check the RAF homepage too, and they give some good information, but they don't have everything that I need...
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