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Thread: AUSTRALIAN Culture and Language Help - II

  1. #11
    emck
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    Ooh, I thought of another one! It's called Stuck in the Mud, and it's kind of like chasy - you have a couple of people (depending on the number of people playing) but if you get caught, you have to stand completely still with your legs spread out until someone crawls through them, then you're free.

    I can remember playing this game well into early high school...though at some point, around the same time when boys became cute, we stopped the whole crawling through each other's legs thing, and just had to tap each other.

    Others I can think of are ball games - I can't remember most of their names, but there's tunnel ball, where everyone stands in a line with their legs open to create a tunnel, and the person at the front of the line rolls a ball through the 'tunnel' and the last person has to catch it and run to the front of the line. The first team to have everyone through wins. We used to play this more in lunch time, or PE, though.

    Another is a game called Hop It Bop It. And no, it's not that lame game where you have to hit all the different buttons, or whatever, it's actually kind of fun. What happens is there are two teams, and something about a third of the size of a netball (basketball?) court. Each team lines up on one side, and the person you're opposite is the person you have to 'fight'. It's pretty simple - in pairs, you have to hop around on one foot, trying to make the other person fall over. If you're like me, and balance challenged, then it's pretty easy to loose...we used to play this in year eight, when our tutor (homeroom teacher, I think) was also the PE teacher. But I'm sure younger kids could play it too...

    I can think of a few others, but I'm running late so I'd better go. I'll write more later, if you'd like...

  2. #12
    U-No-Poo
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    Child Actors

    I agree with the Home and Away thing. Mention Lincoln Lewis (H&A) or Caitlin Stacey (Neighbours) as they are two bigish actors. If you're looking for kids... well the girl from Mortified is a good choice, or alterniviely Bindi Irwin (Steve Irwin's daughter) is a popular hit with kids, she has her own TV show and dance group and stuff. Plus, its very Australian and she promotes the conservation message mercissly.

    Hope this helps

  3. #13
    Fourth Year Ravenclaw
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    Great insult:

    I hope your chooks turn into emus and kick your dunny down.

    I heard that the other day on a documentary about the history of our accent and I'm still laughing.

    Child Actors

    We don't have any super famous child actors, such as what you see in America or England, as we don't have a huge film industry over here. Best bet is to look up who was on Neighbours/Home and Away or ABC kids at the time that your story is set. Kate Richie would be a good one for about 10 years ago as she has been on Home and Away her whole life. If you are using a TV show, we tend to call them by their characters names if they are not famous (ie. Stevie from the Saddle Club, Deklan from Neighbours ect.).

    As for games, unless it is classically American/English, it is likely to be played over here as well. Heads down seven up is probably heads down thumbs up and we play simon says.

    Tee Hee a New Zealander in here? We have a similar relationship with Kiwis that America would have with Canada. We're pretty much the same, but throw the occasional joke their way. I'm sure they do the same
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  4. #14
    emck
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    Okay, that's so the worst insult ever...and completely stereotypical, btw.

    Ah, the Saddle Club! That's another Aussie TV show with little kids in it...lots of themn, actually. The cast is always changing...or something. I haven't actually watched it since I was about ten...actually, if I remember correctly, didn't one of the Saddle Club girls get hit by a train? Or pushed in front of it?

    That's completely off topic, though - I'm still trying to think of other games...and drawing a total blank...

  5. #15
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    Just how common is it for teenagers to work in Australia? Is it even legal for anyone under the age of eighteen to work? Or seventeen as it might be in the wizarding world?

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  6. #16
    Third Year Ravenclaw
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    The legal age for children to work in Australia is 14 years and 9 months and most teenagers hold a casual job at some stage. It's usually in retail or fast food places or cafes and things like that.



  7. #17
    First Year Hufflepuff
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    In my experience, it's very common for teenagers to work in Australia. Amongst my friends, most of us started part time jobs at 15-16, I was a bit of a late bloomer only starting a job at 17. I think parents tend to encourage children to get a job when they're that sort of age. Most people I knew worked in McDonalds, KFC, Target or KMart, or in some sort of restaurant or cafe.

    Hope this helps!

    ~Hannah~

  8. #18
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    I was wondering, do people in Australia used the words 'gonna', wanna', and the like? I have been studying Australian-English language patterns, and I know that it is generally a lot more casual than British English, but I don't know if they use these abriviated words, or if they're just an American thing.

    What are some other 'Australian' words?"

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  9. #19
    First Year Hufflepuff
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    In speech, I think we do say 'gonna' and 'wanna', especially younger generations (who are definitely exposed to American English).

    As for Australian words, what sort of context are you looking for? Things people might say in shops or on the street? At school? At home? There are so many words that are Australian that I guess we take for granted and don't really realise are particular to us, but I'll throw out a few to get started.

    Aussies love to shorten things and add -ie or -o onto the end of words. So:
    Chrissy = Christmas
    Prezzie = present
    pollie = politician
    barbie = barbeque
    kindy = kindergarten
    smoko = quick break from work
    Davo, Jono and Stevo are David, John and Steve.

    A ute is what Americans call a truck (I think, it looks like a car at the front but has a tray thing at the back). They're very popular, especially in country areas.

    Woop woop (the oo is pronounced as in 'look') is the middle of nowhere (as in 'last weekend I was out woop woop.')

    A doona is what Brits call a duvet.

    Poms (or whinging poms) are English people.

    A dunny is a toilet (but I think it's kind of a more country thing, more stereotypically Australian).

    Do you want hardcore Australian stuff like the sort of thing that Steve Irwin would say?

    There's always things like 'crikey' and 'fair dinkum,' which can be used to mean like 'real' or 'true' (I'm a fair dinkum Aussie.) or 'really?' ('I saw a flying unicorn.' 'Fair dinkum?')

    What else? Australians do say 'mate' a lot (especially men), but certainly in cities you don't often hear 'g'day'.

    Men are 'blokes' and women are sometimes known as 'sheilas.'

    That's just a little bit to start with, but if you have specific situations just say!

    ~Hannah (who used to be a whinging pom)~

  10. #20
    Third Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fainting Fancies
    What else? Australians do say 'mate' a lot (especially men), but certainly in cities you don't often hear 'g'day'.
    G'day is actually a very common greeting, especially among men of the Baby Boomers generation (post World War II) and older generations. Depending on whereabouts in a state you are also has an affect on the frequency of the use of G'day as a greeting.



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