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Thread: Ungraduated witches and wizards

  1. #1
    Wembricken
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    Ungraduated witches and wizards

    Hi all, I'm playing with the idea of having an OC in my story who was born with magic, but never graduated from Hogwarts. I was wondering if anyone else had some opinions about the idea of ungraduated witches and wizards and how they might function in wizarding and Muggle society.

    First off, is it feasible? Does it seem logical that perhaps by way of flunking out or withdrawing from school for personal or family reasons, a witch or wizard would never graduate Hogwarts? Do you think they might have the chance to come back as mature students?

    How would such an individual function in wizarding and Muggle societies? Would they be something akin to Squibs, aware of the wizarding world and technically a part of it, but only marginally?

    Would they be allowed to practice magic at all without Hogwarts or other certification? Would their wands be snapped after a certain point when it is clear they won't be returning to magical education?

    Would there be some sort of Ministry register listing witches or wizards who have never graduated?


    Any thoughts would be helpful, thanks!

  2. #2
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
    First Brush With A Dementor

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Well, Hagrid said that some children don't attend Hogwarts. Of course he could just have meant that they go to other schools, but I can absolutely see children being homeschooled. If you look at the OC-threads in the Character Clinic, you'll see two characters by "youaremylifenow" who aren't attending Hogwarts because they are too ill. This is a very plausible scenario in my opinion.
    Also, there were parents like Mrs Finnegan who didn't want their children to return to Hogwarts in the year of OotP. They wouldn't do that if it meant that their children would have their wands snapped...


    Do you think they might have the chance to come back as mature students?
    Yes and no. I don't see adult students in the same lessons as teenagers. I just can't picture it. However, there's a thing here in Germany for people who didn't graduate after 13, but after 10 (I think) years. They can come back and be taught at a regular school, but in classes with only adults, and they only have some classes together with the younger students (for example when there weren't enough students to make two classes, they share one). They have to work harder, because they have less lessons so that they can take care of their children, or continue working while they graduate.
    I don't know if this is very clear, I suck at explaining things like that...

    Okay, so - can you imagine Hagrid returning to school in PoA, studying Transfiguration and Charms with everyone else? I can't really... But what I can imagine is that they can put their names down on a list, and once there's at least, say, five of them, they can (perhaps for a bit of money) study together. They would have lessons at Hogwarts, but if they wanted, they could return to their homes (where perhaps they have families) every evening (perhaps a teacher could apparate there with them and then the teacher would go back to school; or they could take the Knight Bus).



    Would there be some sort of Ministry register listing witches or wizards who have never graduated?

    Yes, I really think so. I suppose there's a list of all witches and wizards, and whether they attended Hogwarts/dropped out/did OWLs/did NEWTs.


    How would such an individual function in wizarding and Muggle societies?

    I think those are the people who push the lunch trolley on the Hogwarts Express, the dishwasher at the Leaky Cauldron, maybe even Stan Shunpike... Things like that.
    And as for how far they would be a part of wizarding society - I really think that depend on the individual persons. A muggleborn who never attended Hogwarts (perhaps because they thought it was some sort of joke) would just continue their life in their world, perhaps with some curious incidents.
    A pureblood wizard born into a family of radicals who don't want their children meeting muggleborns and halfbloods at school would probably think he's something better than those people who only got educated at Hogwarts, as opposed to private lessons with the best, or something like that.
    Those are two extremes; but I really think it depends on the person. Maybe it helps a bit if you think of homeschooled people and people who attended school.
    What're you thinking about in particular? You can PM me if you want


    <3 Kara
    This completely gorgeous banner, which makes me happier than a squirrel, was made by Hokey

  3. #3
    Wembricken
    Guest
    Thanks for the input, Karaley! Definitely makes sense and it's a lot of what I was kind've imagining as well. Shall PM you with my thoughts to keep from giving away too much on the boards!

  4. #4
    sorrow_of_severus
    Guest
    First off, is it feasible? Does it seem logical that perhaps by way of flunking out or withdrawing from school for personal or family reasons, a witch or wizard would never graduate Hogwarts? Do you think they might have the chance to come back as mature students?
    I think it seems very possible for kids to leave Hogwarts before graduation. In real life, teenagers quit school all the time. Usually it's because they are sick of being in school, but sometimes there is a good reason. I don't, however, foresee them coming back to Hogwarts because such a scheme is is not mentioned in the books. Besides, most adults couldn't attend a boarding school simply because they have children to care for by the time they decide that they wished they'd finished school.

    In the U.S., there's something called the GED for people who dropped out of high school. They take some night classes, and then take a test. If they pass, they get the equivalent of a high school diploma. I find the existence of something like this in the wizarding world much more feasible than an adult returning to Hogwarts.

    How would such an individual function in wizarding and Muggle societies? Would they be something akin to Squibs, aware of the wizarding world and technically a part of it, but only marginally?
    It depends how far along in Hogwarts they are when they drop out. If they've only had a couple of training, they'd probably live fairly similarly to a Squib. However, if they'd dropped further along, perhaps in their seventh year, they might manage to function pretty much like a normal Hogwarts graduate. I think Jo has said that there's no wizarding university, so job training after Hogwarts must occur primarily through apprenticeships and similar programs, where skills are often more important than any diploma.

    A perfect example of what I'm talking about is the Weasley twins. They left Hogwarts in their seventh year, but managed to open a very successful business and lived like any other witch or wizard.

    Would they be allowed to practice magic at all without Hogwarts or other certification? Would their wands be snapped after a certain point when it is clear they won't be returning to magical education?
    I don't think that their wand would be snapped, because the Weasley twins left and continued to practice magic. However, if they weren't of age when they left and then used magic before they became of age, their wand would be snapped like any other kid who'd used magic outside of school.

    Would there be some sort of Ministry register listing witches or wizards who have never graduated?
    They Ministry of Magic doesn't seem like the most concerned government. They let young witches and wizards be treated horribly by their ignorant Muggle caretakers (think Tom Marvolo Riddle or Harry Potter). I think I read that a magical quill at Hogwarts records the name of every child with magic as they are born, so the Ministry could make sure the circumstances of these magical children in Muggle places were fine, but they choose not to. Therefore, I don't think they'd care any more about Hogwarts dropouts.

    How would such an individual function in wizarding and Muggle societies?
    It depends. If someone had the right skills and had been at Hogwarts for most of the seven year, (s)he could probably get an apprenticeship or even a job. It would probably be hard to get a Ministry position or a more elite job, like many at Gringott’s seem to be. However, I expect the typical Hogwarts dropout would probably be someone with little talent and/or motivation, so many would end up in menial, unrewarding jobs very similar to a typical Muggle high school dropout, such as scrubbing dishes at the Leakey Cauldron, driving the Knight Bus, or helping Flich with janitorial duties at Hogwarts.

    A Note About Homeschooling: I don't think a homeschooled witch or wizard would be treated the same way as a high school dropout. I live in America and I'm homeschooled. Years and years ago, a homeschooled kid might be treated that way, but awareness of homeschooling has grown tremendously since then. I think wizarding society would be even more accepting of homeschoolers, since most non-Muggle-born witches and wizards were homeschooled before they went to Hogwarts. They'd understand what homeschooling is all about.

    I expect there would be three kinds of homeschooled witches and wizards. Karaley Dargen mentioned the first kind, ones who are too sick or otherwise fragile to go to school, like youaremylife's characters or Arianna Dumbledore. The second kind would be children of pure-blood fanatics, who don't want their precious children exposed to Muggle-borns, Blood-traitors, and less radical ideas. The third kind would be similar to some Muggle homeschoolers (like me), whose families think for a variety of different reasons that their children will be happier without school and will learn just as well, if not better, at home.

  5. #5
    TheCursedQuill
    Guest
    Well, the idea is very plausible. Fred and George never finished Hogwarts, they left right before their seventh year ended. And they became very successful. If they were very talented wizards, such as Fred and George (I'm basing this off what Hermione says about their Day Dream Charm), then they should do fine the wizarding community.

    However, as Laura commented, it would probably be more based on what year they dropped out of. Fred and George were just about to graduate, so they were obviously well trained. Someone who drops out in their second-fourth year, might struggle with more complex spells.

  6. #6
    Wembricken
    Guest
    Ah, yes that makes sense, about the year being important to how a witch or wizard will live if they drop out of Hogwarts. Do you recall if there is a register for Squibs? I think Dumbledore might have mentioned it once. At Harry's trial, maybe? Either way, my story takes place in 1880s London, so I imagine things might be a bit different than they would be in the present day wizarding world.

    Thanks for the help, all!

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