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Thread: Being British XI

  1. #61
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Sure, he would refer to hormones when Lily is pregnant. At least the boys do when my female teachers are moody/pregnant... LOL

    And yup, we use second and third degree burns That is exactly the same here as in America. I think it would be okay for James to use it yeah... I dont see why not.

    Hope I helped!

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    EDIT: Ooh I claim Cumbrian! I tend to go for British though... I dislike London and being asociated with it.. I go for Scottish lol. I may as well be for all the notice London takes of Cumbria
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  2. #62
    Sixth Year Slytherin
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    Sorry, Russia, don't mean to contradict on the hormone thing. I think it would be fairly rare for a man to refer to hormones in the seventies, especially in company. Perfectly normal now, as Russia said, *points to hubby who uses it frequently**rolls eyes at hubby*. In the seventies, although the sixties had happened, they hadn't really happened for a lot of men, especially the type that existed in Lily's realm. I don't recall the term as we would nkow it today entering my consciousness until the late eighties/early nineties.

    Even in the seventies a lot of men still didn't attend births etc and would have seen women's medical matters as not being their domain. I would be more inclined to have him refer to it in a more abstract sense. I think he might refer to it, but he would do it very politely.
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  3. #63
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    I'm writing about Godric's Hollow. Again . So, I found some things that'd aid my description:

    Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses
    • Bay windows (they stick out)
    • Iron Railings
    • Flemish brick bonding
    • Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks
    • Stained glass in doorways and windows.
    • Roofs made of slate.
    • No garage
    • Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

    I want to know if I can use these for a cottage also situated in a south-western village? Or will these not be relevant/appropriate? Something you'd like to suggest otherwise?

    Help appreciated!


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  4. #64
    Almara
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    I have a few questions about kids going to school in England - the story plays in 1976, and my OC is just finishing Year 6.

    - At this time, how would children have been transported to school? Would a school bus be reasonable?
    - Do Junior School children get end-of-year report cards? Do these just contain general comments on the child's progress and behavior (which was the case with me until secondary school), or would these include numerical/letter grades in each individual subject?
    - What kind of events/traditions would happen on the last day of the school year?

  5. #65
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Hey, now I dont know much about the 70's but when I was on Primary School, this is how it played out.

    - At this time, how would children have been transported to school? Would a school bus be reasonable?

    I dont see why not. There wasn't a bus to my primary school, but that is because it was in the middle of the town and the majority of the pupils lived in said town. If you are talking about a country school, buses are very likely if there isnt many kids in the viallge, the only way to keep the school alive is to bus students in. But if there wasn't a bus, I would say m,ost of them woudl walk, or their parents would take them.



    - Do Junior School children get end-of-year report cards? Do these just contain general comments on the child's progress and behavior (which was the case with me until secondary school), or would these include numerical/letter grades in each individual subject?

    We used to get end of year reports cards. But we dont call them report cards... just reports lol so it would be "I get my report on Friday." or whatever. We would have a booklet, and a page on each subject with comments at the bottom on our progress. I dont remember getting grades, but i suppose there must have been some sort of marks.



    - What kind of events/traditions would happen on the last day of the school year?

    Well in my primary school, we finished early on the last day of term. So, instead of finishing school at 3.15pm we would finish at lunchtime, about 12.30. We had the option of staying until 3.15 and just do fun stuff like arts and crafts or play on the computers.

    Sometimes we'd have end of year assemblies too. Where the headmaster would talk for ages.. lol. For the last few days of school we wouldnt really do much work, but do fun things, arts and crafts, or watching films.

    I hope this helped, it may have been different in the 70's though... but not by all that much I think.
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    Thank you Nadia/majestic_ginny! <3
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  6. #66
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padfoot Patronus
    I'm writing about Godric's Hollow. Again . So, I found some things that'd aid my description:

    Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses
    • Bay windows (they stick out)
    • Iron Railings
    • Flemish brick bonding
    • Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks
    • Stained glass in doorways and windows.
    • Roofs made of slate.
    • No garage
    • Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

    I want to know if I can use these for a cottage also situated in a south-western village? Or will these not be relevant/appropriate? Something you'd like to suggest otherwise?

    Help appreciated!
    I can help you here, Padfood Patronus, as I live in a south-western village I can tell you that most cottages in my village aren't typical Victorian houses, they were built much earlier than that, usually some time in the 1700s. Some have slate roofs, some have thatched, they wouldn't have a garage, and if they do it would have been added much later. The houses themselves might either be whitewashed or just plain, local stone. For example, the stone in my area is Hamstone, which is a rich honey colour, but I think I live too far east in relation to be Godric's Hollow type place, which I think is located in north Somerset, near Exmoor (I live in south Somerset).

    The cottages wouldn't have bay windows, iron railings, the brick patterns, or stained glass windows, as these are typically Victorian features so the time period is wrong (also, things like this are found more in towns than villages). However, they might have sash windows, but they might have ones that open outwards with dark metal catches and frames.

    A typical cottage where I live has low door frames, so a tall person would have to duck to get inside, beams on the also low ceilings, a large fireplace, some have flagstone floors covered with rugs. Cottages are usually dark inside because glass was expensive when they were built, so the windows aren't big.

    I feel I am doing a terrible job of explaining this, so I would google search Somerset cottages, they're realistic of what you find down here, and so base your description on that. I hope I've helped slightly.

  7. #67
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    I have a question about British primary schools. What sort of contest do kids have; I mean like spelling bees?

    One thing we had at my old school was a program called Accelerated Reader, which was a school-wide contest to see which student could read the most books in one year.

    I suppose I want to know what sort of contests British schools have along those lines, but also athletic and other sorts as well.

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  8. #68
    psijupiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    I have a question about British primary schools. What sort of contest do kids have; I mean like spelling bees?

    One thing we had at my old school was a program called Accelerated Reader, which was a school-wide contest to see which student could read the most books in one year.

    I suppose I want to know what sort of contests British schools have along those lines, but also athletic and other sorts as well.
    It really depends on the school. My primary school attended local singing competitions, with choirs and solos. We had local sports matches, for Netball, Football and Athletics. Sometimes these would be tournaments, but normally just friendly matches against one school. Maybe other sports, but I don't think so. Most schools would only compete with other schools in their area and I get the impression that alot of it depends on the enthusiasm of the Headteacher and teachers running the Choir/Sports teams. So some schools do very little, while others do alot. In my school, once the teacher who ran the Choir left we didn't go back to the singing competition. We didn't have a football team until my last two years, when a new teacher joined and set one up. (And I promptly had to campaign for him to let girls on the team too. :P)

    Oh, and there is traditionally a Sports Day in the last week of term. Sack races, three legged races, egg-and-spoon, plus sprints, obstacle courses and relays, maybe? And Mums and Dads races, which were always funny. Usually a toddler race, for younger siblings as well. Parents wouldn't come to a match against another school, but there is usually a good turn out to watch Sports Days.

  9. #69
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
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    I'm not aware of any academic inter-school competitions. It is, as has been said, up to the Headteacher.

    Football is king (whether you like it or not). If a school does not have a team then parents (invariably Dads) wil organise one. A lot of primary schools play mixed football (at primary level, up to eleven, there is little point in segregating girls). There are always local school leagues.

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  10. #70
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    At the primary school I work at,( age 5-11) we have a football team, a tag rugby team and a netball team. They play other schools. It's not organised by the parents but by the school as an extra-curricular activity.

    There aren't any academic competitions as far as I'm aware - we don't have spelling-bees for instance. In fact competions as a whole were seen as 'bad' things because they discouraged pupils. Fact is, competition is around all the time, and schools are now seeing a value in it because it encourages pride in your school. (Sorry, minor rant there).

    You may find a country wide competition like National Essay Writing (Currently there's one called The Big Write) where a school will submit stories in a competition. The school may get a sum of money if one of their pupils wins, but it's not pitting the schools against each other.

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