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Thread: Being British XI

  1. #21
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
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    In addition to what Equinox Chick said - for younger children, infant/junior school age, (up to 11) their class teacher would be informed and in all likelihood the parents would leave any medication with the school secretary. (I think they are expected provide the school with written permission to use the medication, too).

    N

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  2. #22
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    In Addition to Northumbrian's extensive music list, I'd like to say that my sister (who was a Marauder era(ish) girl) was heavily into American music like Stevie Wonder in the seventies.

    Punk Rock was the big thing at the end of the seventies though.

    Biggest hit of 1976 was Thin Lizzy - the Boys are back in Town.

    I can see Lily as either a folk music girl (think Joni Mitchell) or some soul.

    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian
    Rock against Racism was a new idea then too. Margaret Thatcher, riots in the streets.
    But Maggie Thatcher wasn't PM until 1979 and Rock against Racism was definitely the 80's. (Billy Bragg etc)

    Sirius would have been a cool Glam rocker - but beginning of the eighties he'd have come into his own as a New Romantic - Sirius Black AKA Adam Ant.

    Carole
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  3. #23
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equinox Chick
    Sirius would have been a cool Glam rocker - but beginning of the eighties he'd have come into his own as a New Romantic - Sirius Black AKA Adam Ant.

    Carole
    It strikes me that Severus Snape could well have fitted in as a Banshees Boy, Siouxsies early proto-goth look would fit in with Snape's penchant for all things black.

    I forgot The Cure, how could I forget The Cure?

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  4. #24
    LilyLunaPotter
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    I'm looking for a general idea of 70s slang in Britain. I've found sites that give lists and definitions of slang words used in the 70s, but how different was Britain from America?

  5. #25
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    That depends on the terms you're using, Lilu.

    If you gave some examples in this thread (or PM me if you'd rather) then I'll see if they're valid Brit slang words or not. Generally though, Americanisms were only just starting to seep into the British culture and only with the younger generation.

    The trouble with slang is that it's also dependent on region. I could probably help you with London/Southern slang but if your character hales from 'oop North, then you'll be better asking someone else (although I did live in Carlisle for a while)

    Carole
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  6. #26
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equinox Chick
    That depends on the terms you're using, Lilu.

    If you gave some examples in this thread (or PM me if you'd rather) then I'll see if they're valid Brit slang words or not. Generally though, Americanisms were only just starting to seep into the British culture and only with the younger generation.

    The trouble with slang is that it's also dependent on region. I could probably help you with London/Southern slang but if your character hales from 'oop North, then you'll be better asking someone else (although I did live in Carlisle for a while)

    Carole
    If you want help with Northern Slang I can help you out, whenever I meet someone new and tell them where I'm from (Sunderland/Newcastle/Durham Area) they think I live in Scottland, not England!

    - Hannah

  7. #27
    LilyLunaPotter
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    British Slang of the 70s

    Going on a case-by-case basis, I'm writing the Marauders and had a scene in which one of them said "You totally psyched him out" to mean confused/surprised him, and "ace" to mean cool. "Psyched him out" and "ace" I found on lists of slang words common in the 70s, but I've been told they're pretty American. Are there alternatives that kids would use or should I just stick to non-slangy words?

  8. #28
    leahsm2
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    Culture Clash

    In the US, when children of color from disadvantaged backgrounds work hard at school, they are sometimes ostracized as trying to "act white." Is that a common occurence in the UK as well?

    Also, in large cities in the US they tended to have large housing complexes ("projects") in urban areas. Would there be anything comparable in large cities in the UK?

  9. #29
    psijupiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by leahsm2
    In the US, when children of color from disadvantaged backgrounds work hard at school, they are sometimes ostracized as trying to "act white." Is that a common occurence in the UK as well?

    Also, in large cities in the US they tended to have large housing complexes ("projects") in urban areas. Would there be anything comparable in large cities in the UK?
    Hmm, I've never heard of that, but I grew up in a very white town, so while my instincts say it probably doesn't happen I'm not sure. It's worth noting that over here Asian families have a reputation for pushing their families very hard. I also feel that class plays a much bigger role in how people act at school - children from middle-class families will be expected to work hard and go to university, whereas children from lower-class families will not always have that same push, particuarly if their parents did not engage with education. (I remember learning that if a parent has low levels of literacy, with all the best education and programs and money that the government can throw at their child, there is only a 2% chance that the child will ever have higher levels of literacy than their parent.) This is true no matter the ethnic background of the family, however families from non-white backgrounds are more likely to be in lower socio-economic groups.

    (I could talk more about school and education in the UK. I'll restrain myself.)

    In the UK we have council flats and houses that are owned by the local council, that are given to people who have nowhere else to live. However there is a huge shortage, as many people in the 80/90s bought their council home from the the council. The flats and houses can be grouped together, but I don't think they cover as large an area as the US 'projects.' (I don't know much about the 'projects' though.) Many inner-city areas with high levels of poverty have a high percentage of non-white residents, which might be more comparable to the US 'projects.'

  10. #30
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Li-Lu - Psyched out is too American for the Marauders and so is ace (although I used it a lot in the 80's 90's).

    I'd use cool in stead of ace - or Fab perhaps.

    Hmm, psyched out - sorry I need to think. Possibly you totally fooled him - which isn't slang but it's all I can think of at the momenet. If I think of anything better then I'll PM you, hon.

    Leahsm2
    In the US, when children of color from disadvantaged backgrounds work hard at school, they are sometimes ostracized as trying to "act white." Is that a common occurence in the UK as well?
    Err, no. Infact a large majority of the 'underclass' in British society are white. I think the American term is trailer trash or white trash (sorry if that's offensive). As the previous poster said - the Asian community are actually the ones who push and push their children. Hard work isn't just encouraged - it's expected.

    Actually we're still quite a class driven society so pushy parents are percieved as being 'middle class' - they have high expectations for their kids but know they'll need to use their brains to get to the top.

    Carole
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

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