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Thread: Being British XI

  1. #111
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Weasley Mum - Yeah, you could use 'hanging out' as Sarah says. I'm pretty sure I used it in late eighties and nineties but that was largely due to the influence of such seminal shows as Beverley Hills 90210 - I'm not sure the Marauders or Trio Era would use it as they don't watch such classics


    Molly - Hmm, adding to the ones Northumbrian and Sarah said, I'd also mention specific ones from my neck of the woods (London) like 'honey' 'angel' 'flower' 'petal' 'sweetheart' or anything that takes the girls name and makes it sound sweeter. For instance if a child can't say its name properly when they're two they'll often get called that for ages. My daughter couldn't say the name Jessica so is often called 'Jecca'.

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  2. #112
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    Thanks very much. The piece is actually set with Deathly Hallows, but I may go for it anyway. Just didn't want the phrase to seem ridiculous coming out of British mouths.

  3. #113
    Finest Firewhisky
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsmekirill
    When I want to say someone is a good actor, I say they deserve an Academy Award, which is an internationally known but nevertheless American institution. Is there a British analogue for this?
    It's well known and referred to as an Oscar. The main British media awards are BAFTAs, which are both for TV and films. An Oscar is more respected than a BAFTA, however, because a Brit making a hit in America is seen as a lot rarer than a Brit making a hit over here.

  4. #114
    the_weird_one
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    Hello! I have a question.

    How often do you Brits say "mum"? Do you often interchange it with "Mom" or "mother"? Do you have any other special names for brother and sisters? Just asking.

    Thank you!
    -Addy

  5. #115
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Mum is the most common name for mothers.

    We NEVER say 'Mom'

    We say 'Mother' sometimes... but only when we're sucking up or being silly...

    Up North (Where I live, Cumbria) some people say 'mam', but I think that's only done up North, I dont think Southerners use it.

    So yeah, I would say go with Mum, (NEVER mom )

    Hope I helped, Russia xxxxx

    EDIT: Just read your post properly

    I dont think we ave any soecial names for 'brother' or 'sister' we have 'bro' and 'sis' but they're not commonly used.
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  6. #116
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    *Nods in agreement with Russia*

    Although, upperclass people might say 'Mummy'. A few years ago, Prince Charles at the age of sixty called his mum (The Queen ) 'Mummy'. It's a definite aristocracy thing, my friend's mother called her parents Mummy and Daddy when they were in their eighties

    Brothers and sisters. We might say 'sis' but 'bro' isn't widely used as Russia said. Generally though, we'd call our siblings by their proper name of a childhood nickname (think of Bella and Cissy)

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  7. #117
    Finest Firewhisky
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    All very true. Siblings will call eachother by their first names. My sister often calls me "lil' bro" but that's because my sister is very strange.

    As for mothers, "Mum" is used by the majority, but the typically more Irish "mam" is becoming more common, especially amongst the urban youth. Safer to go with "mum" though.

  8. #118
    Sparrow
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    I would always call my Mum 'Mum' although it's true there is some region variations. As for siblings nicknames are generally quite common, either as shortened versions of their first name or other terms, often endearments. When talking about children/siblings to other people in some regions the word 'our' is used, such as 'our Harry,' or 'our Alice.' Apperance based terms are often common (eg. my brother is often called short-stack/shortie by both me and my friends.)

  9. #119
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Calling someone by 'our' (like our Harry) I think is a northern thing. My housemates (from Yorkshire and Durham) say it, but I (from Somerset) don't. The one from Durham calls her mum 'mam', but that's mainly due to her accent. My boyfriend (from Yorkshire), when talking to his brothers or sisters will refer to his parents as 'me (my) Dad'.

    I usually call my parents Mum and Dad, but if I'm being annoying, I'll call my mum 'mother' of 'muv'. My dad calls his parents 'ma' and 'pa', though. However, if my mum is talking to us children about Dad, or Dad talking to us about Mum, they call each other Mummy and Daddy, as in I'll ask where Dad is, and Mum will tell me: 'Daddy's just gone up to the shop'. I have no idea why she does this since we stopped calling them Mummy and Daddy years ago. Probably a vain attempt to keep their children young

    So yeah, it does differ slightly, mainly due to region, but Mum and Dad are pretty much the norm. I can't think of any other names for brothers and sisters.

    Sarah x


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  10. #120
    leahsm2
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    Perfect timing. How about the term "mama?" It seems a bit more intimate to me than "mummy," but is it British at all?

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