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Thread: Grammar, Capitalisation, Canon issues, etc

  1. #71
    Fifth Year Hufflepuff
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    Also, just to add, a comma before the 'and' in this case isn't needed because without the appositive the sentence would read, "It deserves many prizes and the affections of generations of readers." You don't use a comma before the 'and' of the last item in a list unless the list has three or more items. (In that case, it's personal preference of whether or not to use one.) Since "the affections of generations of readers" isn't a complete sentence, the comma-conjunction rule doesn't apply.

    I hope that makes a little bit of sense. Sorry for going all nerdbabble on you.

    Hope that helps!


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  2. #72
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    I have a question. I checked on HP Wiki on how to spell Firewhiskey. Now, I have always spelt it like that, but I see some people spell it Firewhisky too. I've always stuck to using the e but I wanted to know which was correct, bearing in mind the fact that whiskey on its own can be spelt with or without the e.

    And if I'm wrong and an e isn't needed, I have a spot of editing to do

    Edit so I'm not spamming: okay, I think I'll go with Firewhisky without the e. Thank you, Carole and Jess!
    Last edited by babewithbrains; 09-24-2011 at 09:51 AM.

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  3. #73
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    In the US editions, it's spelled firewhisky. Check DH in Chapter 5 about seven pages from the end of the chapter (you might have different page numbers than me, but mine is p. 79). I don't know, however, if there is really an official canon spelling, but as a Potterword, it should likely be capitalised.
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  4. #74
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    UK editions spell it Firewhisky - without the 'e'. But we spell whisky without the 'e' and I believe you lot over the pond spell it with an 'e'.

    ~Croll~


    Jess edit: I've always spelled 'whiskey' with an 'e'. Maybe that is a US/UK English thing.
    Last edited by Equinox Chick; 09-24-2011 at 12:25 PM.
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  5. #75
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    Whisky is distilled in Scotland and is, therefore, Scotch. (which could give a whole new meaning to Butterscotch).
    Whiskey is distilled in Ireland (and is Irish)
    Bourbon is distilled in the USA and is (apparently) whiskey.
    The Japanese distill using Scottish techniques and (therefore) produce whisky.
    The Canadians, especially and unsurprisingly in Nova Scotia, produce whisky, too.

    So, it's not UK/US, it's more complicated than that.

    The word comes from the gaelic "uisge beatha" or "water of life"

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  6. #76
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    This is something I've been wondering for a while. Okay say your character is quoting someone else as saying 'the sea is green.' When you put that into their dialogue, do you just have the single quotation mark, followed by the double speech marks? Because I think that: Anthony said, "Jenny, stop saying 'the sea is green'" looks clumsy. I don't know whether there are any definite rules about this or not.

    Alex
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  7. #77
    Essence_of_Lily
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    I'm pretty sure you do that, even if it looks pretty weird. I've read that in books, so I think you can use it.

  8. #78
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    I think it's correct, too, Alex, though I agree it's not the best looking sentence. Sometimes I choose not to make it a direct quote to avoid doing this... "Jenny, stop telling everyone that the sea is green!" But at times it's unavoidable.
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  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by welshdevondragon View Post
    This is something I've been wondering for a while. Okay say your character is quoting someone else as saying 'the sea is green.' When you put that into their dialogue, do you just have the single quotation mark, followed by the double speech marks? Because I think that: Anthony said, "Jenny, stop saying 'the sea is green'" looks clumsy. I don't know whether there are any definite rules about this or not.

    Alex
    Agreed with everyone that it is done this way. At least, in UK English, you have the slight relief of being able to put a full stop/end of sentence punctuation mark between the single quote and the double quote.

    "In UK English, it looks like 'this'."

    "But in US English, it looks like 'this.'" >.>
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  10. #80
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    Just want to throw in my two cents. Single quotes should be used when you are having a speaker quote someone else. But I think I disagree with ToBeOrNotToBeAGryffindor I have never seen the double quote go outside the full stop in the US. Everything I have ever seen it is done the same way the British version is. So you could say:

    Anthony said, "Jenny, stop saying 'the sea is green'."

    Also I agree with Weasley Mom, you don’t need to make ‘the sea is green’ a direct quote. You can just say:

    “Jenny, stop telling people the sea is green.”

    I think an argument can be made for being able to keep your sentence the way it is without quotes so it would be:
    “Jenny, stop saying the sea is green.”

    Usually direct quotes are used when the material being quote is direct and memorable. ‘The sea is green’ is pretty general. And I think it could be considered a paraphrase since it is the main idea of what Jenny is saying, but is it actually her whole complete quote? Or is she saying: ‘Did you know the sea is green’ or maybe ‘I think the sea is green’.
    I think all these ways would be technically correct.

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