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Thread: Grammar, Capitalisation, Canon issues, etc

  1. #21
    [la_vie_boheme]
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    I was wondering, since I've only read the American versions and don't want to get this horribly wrong, how you would word dates in British English.

    Like, in American English, you would say "September 1st" but how would you say it in British English? Would it just be "the 1st of September?"

  2. #22
    TheCursedQuill
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    Well, I'm not British or anything, but seeing as JK uses the date for the start of class as "1 September" in the British edition, then I'm pretty sure that's how you would use it . She also uses 31 July in the next sentance, so I'm positive this is how you would phrase it.

  3. #23
    Honigkuchenpferd Hufflepuff
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCursedQuill
    Well, I'm not British or anything, but seeing as JK uses the date for the start of class as "1 September" in the British edition, then I'm pretty sure that's how you would use it . She also uses 31 July in the next sentance, so I'm positive this is how you would phrase it.
    In letters that would be totally fine. However, in narration, you'd rather write "At the first of September, Harry woke up, feeling all excited." or something along that line.
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  4. #24
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    As a Brit, we write our dates as day/month/year, but we'd often say something like

    "My birthday is March the twenty-first." There's no set rule about it, except when writing the date as a number as I explained above.


    Quote Originally Posted by coolh5000
    I would agree with BB that most spells have names and it is better to use those (not italicised) than use the incantation to describe the spell. I'm not sure about whether incantations should be italicised when not in direct speech, because I can't think of an example at the moment where the incantation is referred to without it being cast.
    Moody in GOF The Unforgiveable Curses says

    "Yes, the last and worst. Avada Kedavra ... the killing curse.
    As you can see the spell is italicised in that bit.Hermione also refers to the spell a line or two earlier and it's also italicised. So I think it's fair to say that if Harry is asking Ron to cast the Cruciatus Curse, he'd say.

    "Ron, cast Crucio on Malfoy for me, will you?"

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  5. #25
    Fourth Year Hufflepuff
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    mum, dad - capitalised or not? They are capitalised in my American version DH. What d'you say?

    -Akay-


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  6. #26
    iamlordvoldemort
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padfoot Patronus
    mum, dad - capitalised or not? They are capitalised in my American version DH. What d'you say?

    -Akay-
    Depends on the context, I think. "my mum" or "Ron's dad" should be lowercased, but addressing people like that as a name - "Hey, Mum" should be capitalised.

  7. #27
    The Canon Queen Hufflepuff
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    Akay,

    Yes, they are capitalized unless they are preceded by a possessive. By that I mean, my, his, hers, your, Ron's, etc.

    Also, it is always Mum never Mom unless the character is from the USA as in one of my stories.
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  8. #28
    A.H.
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    a) Wandmaker

    b) wand maker

    c) Wand Maker

    d) other variation


    Which? Thank you.

  9. #29
    Inverarity
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    "Wand" is not a capitalized Potterword.

    I can't remember if it was "wand-maker" or "wandmaker" in the books, but either one would be linguistically appropriate; wizards would probably treat it as a common compound noun, hence, "wandmaker."

  10. #30
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    I have a question that has been driving me made lately. Is it spelled 'wizarding' or 'Wizarding'? I have seen it used both ways, so which is it?

    Also, does he-who-must-not-be-named need to be capitalized?

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