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Thread: Types of brooms?

  1. #1
    mahogany_wand
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    Types of brooms?

    Sorry if this has already been covered, but what are some other types of broomsticks apart from the classic Cleansweep and Nimbus?

    Also, what's the plural of Nimbus? Is is Nimbus', Nimbi, or what? Thanks in advance for your help!

    ~M_W

  2. #2
    Inverarity
    Guest
    Quidditch Through the Ages describes some other models. They might be listed on the Lexicon too.

    Quote Originally Posted by mahogany_wand
    Also, what's the plural of Nimbus? Is is Nimbus', Nimbi, or what? Thanks in advance for your help!
    The Latin plural would be "nimbi," but it's also acceptable (and more common) English usage to pluralize it the way we do most Latin words ending in -i: "nimbuses."

    When referring to a brand/model name, it would definitely be "Nimbuses."

  3. #3
    padfoot_returns
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    Off the HLP:

    Bluebottle
    A broomstick for the family with a built-in Anti-Burglar Buzzer (GF8).
    bluebottle [Eng.] any of several species of flying insect of a metallic bright blue colour.


    Cleansweep Series Brooms
    A series of sport broomsticks produced by the Cleansweep Broom Company beginning in 1926 (QA9):

    * Cleansweep One
    The first of the Cleansweep series, this model (released in 1926) cornered as did no other broom before it. Within a year of its release the Cleansweep One dominated the racing-broom market, having been designed specifically for sporting use (QA9).

    * Cleansweep Two
    Released in 1934, this broom model was an improved version of the Cleansweep One (QA9).

    * Cleansweep Three
    This broom model was an improved version of the Cleansweep Two and was released in 1937 (QA9).

    * Cleansweep Five
    The Weasley twins fly these broomsticks (CS7).

    * Cleansweep Six
    The Quibbler, in its September (or August, possibly) 1995 [Y15] issue, carried an interview with a wizard who claimed to have flow to the moon on one of these brooms, and had returned with a bag of moon frogs to prove it (OP10).

    * Cleansweep Seven
    Oliver Wood mentioned this as a possible broom for Harry when they were first introduced (PS9). This suggests that no later Cleansweep model was available at the time. Most of the Ravenclaw team in Harry's third year flew these (PA12).

    * Cleansweep Eleven
    The Cleansweep Eleven was released in 1995 [Y15], making it the latest broomstick in the series. Ron Weasley received one as a reward upon being made a prefect (OP9). He was very happy about it, so we know a fair bit about its specifications from him:

    o It can go from nought to seventy in ten seconds (OP9). This is presumably in miles per hour, as broomstick speeds are typically expressed that way (QA9).
    o

    The handle is made of Spanish oak (OP9). Note that oak is a wand wood (PS5).


    Comet Broom Series
    Series of broomsticks produced by the Comet Trading Company (formed 1929) (QA9):

    * Comet 140
    The first of the Comet series of racing broomsticks, numbered 140 because of the number of models tested during its development. This model (released in 1929) incorporated the patented Horton-Keitch braking charm (QA9).

    * Comet 180
    The second of the Comet series of racing broomsticks, this model was released in 1938 (QA9).

    * Comet Two Sixty (Comet 260)
    A recent entry in the Comet series of racing broomsticks, released no later than 1991. We've seen three of these in action:
    o Draco Malfoy flew one before he made the Slytherin team (PS9).
    o Cho Chang flies one (PA13).
    o Tonks flies one (OP3).

    * Comet Two Ninety (Comet 290)
    The most recent entry in the Comet series of racing broomsticks. Its maximum acceleration is nought to sixty, and that only with a decent tailwind according to Which Broomstick as quoted by Ron (OP9).


    Ellerby & Spudmore
    A broom manufacturer; for information on its brooms please see Tinderblast or Swiftstick (QA9).


    The Firebolt
    Released in the summer of 1993 [Y13], the Firebolt is currently the fastest racing broom in the world. Harry saw a prototype in Quality Quidditch Supplies the summer it came out and was sorely tempted to empty his Gringotts vault to buy one (PA4). He resisted the temptation, however, and to his surprise received a Firebolt for Christmas from his godfather, Sirius Black (PA11). The Irish International Side flew Firebolts in the 1994 [Y14] Quidditch World Cup (GF8).

    *

    streamlined, superfine handle of ash, treated with a diamond-hard polish
    *

    hand-numbered with its own registration number
    *

    tail twigs of birch, individually selected and honed to aerodynamic perfection
    *

    unsurpassable balance
    *

    pinpoint precision
    *

    acceleration of 150 mph in 10 seconds
    *

    unbreakable Braking Charm
    *

    when you pick it up then let go, it hovers at exactly the right height to mount
    *

    turns with the lightest touch, seems to obey thought rather than grip
    *

    superbly smooth action


    Flyte and Barker
    Broom manufacturer, maker of the Twigger 90 (QA9).


    Moontrimmer
    A slender, ash-handled model of broom that for its time (first created in 1901 by Gladys Boothby) could achieve record-breaking heights (at least, record-breaking while the flyer maintained control at such an altitude). Its maximum speed was less than seventy miles per hour (QA9).


    Nimbus Series Brooms
    Series of high-end broomsticks produced by the Nimbus Racing Broom Company (formed 1967) (QA9).

    * Nimbus 1000
    The first broomstick of the Nimbus series, this model was revolutionary in its day for reaching speeds of up to 100 miles per hour and being capable of turning 360 degrees at a fixed point in mid-air (QA9). This broom put the Nimbus Racing Broom Company at the top of the broom manufacturing field, a title it boasted for some time.

    * Nimbus 1001
    * Nimbus 1500
    * Nimbus 1700
    Brooms which followed the release of the Nimbus 1000 between 1967 and 1990 and ensured the Nimbus Racing Broom Company stayed atop the field of sport brooms.

    * Nimbus 2000
    Harry's first broom, given to him by Professor McGonagall in his first year (PS10). At the time he received it, it was the best broom available; he used it until it blew into the Whomping Willow during his third year (PA9).

    * Nimbus 2001
    Released just before the start of Harry's second year in 1992, a year after the Nimbus 2000. Lucius Malfoy bought seven of these to outfit the Slytherin Quidditch Team; there's some evidence that this was why Draco was made the team's Seeker, as he really isn't a particularly good player.


    Oakshaft 79
    A large, heavy broom built by Elias Grimstone in 1879 and designed for endurance flying. This was the broom used by Jocunda Sykes when she became the first person to cross the Atlantic Ocean by broom (QA9).


    Shooting Star
    The cheapest racing broom ever released as of its release in 1955, but the buyer got what was paid for; the Shooting Star's ability to accelerate and to achieve respectable altitudes didn't hold up well over the long haul (QA9).

    *

    Ron's old Shooting Star was sometimes "outstripped by passing butterflies" (CS4); since the manufacturer, Universal Brooms Ltd., went out of business in 1978 and the observation about the Shooting Star's speed was made in 1992 [Y12], the decrepitude of the old Shooting Star was not perhaps surprising.
    *

    The Hogwarts school brooms include Shooting Stars (PA10).


    Silver Arrow
    Produced by Leonard Jewkes sometime after the development of the Moontrimmer, this achived higher speeds than either the Moontrimmer or the Oakshaft 79; its maximum speed of 70 miles per hour with a decent tailwind was very good for its time (QA9).

    *

    Madam Hooch had one once upon a time and remembers it fondly. She compared the Firebolt to it in a way that suggests that the Silver Arrow had a slim handle which might have been made of ash (PA13).


    Swiftstick
    A broom produced by Ellerby and Spudmore, who had earlier released the Tinderblast, in 1952. It was never used for Quidditch because of its inability to ascend powerfully (QA9).


    Tinderblast
    Broom produced by Ellerby in Spudmore in 1940, twelve years before they released the Swiftstick. It traveled somewhat slower than the Comets and Cleansweeps of its time and thus was never used in sports (QA9).


    Twigger 90
    A gimmicky broom produced by Flyte and Barker in 1990, the Twigger 90 warps under high speeds and thus has never been used for Quidditch (QA9).
    You can head over there with more info on brooms

    xxRiham

  4. #4
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Well, padfoot_returns very thoroughly covered British brooms, but what about foreign ones? Considering that Ali Bashir wanted to export flying carpets to Britain, I would expect there to be a few foreign broom makes as well.

    I've actually sketched some designs for non-British brooms, and this is what I have:

    Brooms of the World

    In case you can't read my handwriting, this is what they are, from top to bottom:

    Volksbesen 2005 - Germany ("People's Broom")
    Tata 2 - India
    Glisenti Falco 360 - Italy
    Chauchat 8 - France
    AK-47 Venik - Russia ("Kalashnikov's Automatic Rifle Model of Year 1947 Broom")

    Yes, I know I wrote a different name for the last one in the picture, but that's it's official name, I've decided.

    Tim the Enchanter

  5. #5
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    And these all appear to be Quidditch brooms to me. Let's not forget, there are other sports played on brooms as well. My guess is that a broom used to play the American sport, Quodpot, is very different from one that would be used to play Quidditch.

    There is a lot of potential to use your imagination when it comes to making brooms.

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  6. #6
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    And these all appear to be Quidditch brooms to me. Let's not forget, there are other sports played on brooms as well. My guess is that a broom used to play the American sport, Quodpot, is very different from one that would be used to play Quidditch.

    There is a lot of potential to use your imagination when it comes to making brooms.
    I'd imagine that brooms for Quodpot would have to be very sturdy and capable of surviving quite a lot of abuse - I wouldn't be surprised if the broom handle had metal braces or something like that. Also, it would have to carry more weight than a Quidditch broom - since Quodpot is played with an exploding ball, I'd imagine that the players would wear some sort of protective armour, probably of leather or even dragon hide.

    So, all in all, I think that Quodpot brooms would have thicker shafts, and likely reinforced. Plus, there would probably be stirrups like in the movies, to help keep the rider on the broom in case the ball exploded while the player was holding it. Also, some sort of fire-retardant spells would be a must. These brooms could very well travel at high speeds, but they'd have slow acceleration and poor maneuverability.

    Tim the Enchanter

  7. #7
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    Interesting thoughts on the Quodpot brooms, Tim. I have a chapter coming up soon about Quodpot, so I really should start thinking about it more. You're ideas were very helpful, and I hope you don't mind me stealing them (you stole my Danish name, remember?)

    You also have to wonder what Quodpot brooms would be named. All the names used on Qudditch brooms seem a bit...flimsey for the abuse a Quodpot broom is designed to take. What do all think? I suppose I'll be off doing some research too.

    Also, Tim's drawing of brooms from around the world got me thinking. How do you think broom making differs from around the world? How does a British broom differ from one made in America or Brazil for instance? Do people order imported brooms the way they import cars? Are there sterotypes that go along with a certain country's brooms?

    So, so much to think about. It boggles the mind.

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  8. #8
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    Interesting thoughts on the Quodpot brooms, Tim. I have a chapter coming up soon about Quodpot, so I really should start thinking about it more. You're ideas were very helpful, and I hope you don't mind me stealing them (you stole my Danish name, remember?)
    Remember Molly, I did ask first if I could use the names you came up with, and as far as I recall, I haven't used them yet. But I digress. Go right ahead with my Quodpot ideas, and I don't mind if you use them.

    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    You also have to wonder what Quodpot brooms would be named. All the names used on Qudditch brooms seem a bit...flimsey for the abuse a Quodpot broom is designed to take. What do all think? I suppose I'll be off doing some research too.
    Well, have fun with that! The only names I can come up with at the moment that sound tough are things like Javelin or Xyston, but I've noticed that I can only think of names derived from weapons...

    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOli_Med
    Also, Tim's drawing of brooms from around the world got me thinking. How do you think broom making differs from around the world? How does a British broom differ from one made in America or Brazil for instance? Do people order imported brooms the way they import cars? Are there sterotypes that go along with a certain country's brooms?

    So, so much to think about. It boggles the mind.
    Here are some stereotypes that I've come up with:

    Germany: Fast, very efficient, but a little on the expensive side. However, they are well worth their price. One brand I came up with is Volksbesen, originally founded by Grindelwald so that every family in Germany could have an affordable broomstick. The Volksbesen designs aren't well suited for Quidditch (not maneuverable enough), but they are widely exported and liked as being dependable, sturdy, and somewhat affordable brooms for wizarding jobs that require flying, like patrolling dragon reserves.

    Italy: Italian brooms have a reputation for being fast, flashy, but incredibly finicky. Italy produces some of the most sought-after racing brooms that not only have unmatched performance, but also look ridiculously stylish - the shafts are made of exotic woods, are engraved or inlaid, and even have figureheads at the front. Unfortunately, these brooms are mind-bogglingly expensive, and don't work properly half of the time, so they require quite a lot of maintenance. But when brooms like the Gisenti series do fly in top form, there are few brooms that can keep pace.

    France: For a nation that prides itself as being artistic, French brooms are ironically some of the ugliest and worst in the world. And it gets worse - they're not even priced to reflect this badness. Stick to French cuisine, but avoid their brooms at all costs!

    Russia: These brooms are appallingly ugly, but at least they are very cheap and surprisingly reliable. Russian brooms do not make good quidditch brooms, because they're not particularly fast or maneuverable. However, they are so incredibly simple that nothing could possibly go wrong with them, and they can take a lot of abuse. They're also highly resistant to cold temperatures. During the Cold War, some Muggle-born Soviet wizards made a broom out of a Kalashnikov and christened it the AK-47 Venik, but it couldn't fly very well - but at least it looked ridiculously sinister!

    Those are some of my crazy thoughts at the moment...

    Right. Back to studying!

    Tim the Enchanter

  9. #9
    Inverarity
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    Two American broom models I have come up with in my story are the Valkyrie and the Twister. (I don't really go into a lot of detail on them -- I describe the Valkyrie as "more stable" while the Twister is "more nimble").

  10. #10
    AurorKeefy
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    Are we quoting our own made up brooms? Oh, good. Well, I've a few that I might as well mention.

    1) The Orion Custom (c.1987-9)

    A Quidditch broom available only through order, whose specifications depend upon the requirements of the potential buyer. Thus the broom tends to fly exceptionally under it's owner, but much less well under other riders.

    The Orion was by far the best broom available at the time of it's release, though a lack of versatility, high cost and resulting few sales meant that the Orion company was eventually absorbed into the Nimbus company, shortly before they produced the Nimbus 2000.

    2. The Nimbus Curvehorn (c.1984-90)

    A highly respected broom, seen in many respects as the precursor to the Nimbus 2000. A well weighted handle and aerodynamically clipped branches meant that the Curvehorn enjoy considerable success during the tail-end of the 1980's, even being used by some national sides.

    The other two brooms I had seem less worth describing, since they seem worthless under the canon information above. The Comet 130 makes no sense, and with the information we have about the Shooting Stars, the Valdor Deluxe (an awful broom) seems completely pointless.

    These were all broomsticks that Gordon debates buying in the second book of the Evil Kneazle series.

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