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Thread: LATIN Language Help II

  1. #11
    Second Year Ravenclaw
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    Don't know if you guys still need any help but...

    Molly: Possible 'opening' spells: Detegere, Nudare (to uncover), Revelare (to unveil)
    Possible 'closing and hiding' spells: Celare (to conceal/hide), Reddere, Referre (to return/give back), Redire (to return/go back). If you wanted to use Redire, I'd suggest using the imperative "go back!" - redi in the sg and redite in the pl, I believe (am doing that off the top of my head, so sorry if it's not right. )

    Sandy: gratias means thanks! (as an interjection - theres a verb that's something like 'gratias agere' that takes the dative, but that seems a little much for what you want)
    Not sure if this really works, but I couldn't quite find anything for 'to miss' - 'to feel the want of' is desiderare. >> A look at the Latin-English side of my dictionary gives 'to miss' as a definition!
    all - omnia (adj; n, pl, acc) >> A little bit of research leads me to the knowledge that omnia would be used as a substantive (that is, as a noun). When left neuter, I think it generally refers to 'all things'.
    everybody - omnes (adj; m/f, pl, acc) So use omnes if you're referring more to a masculine noun (such as homines - people/men) or a female noun (puellas - girls).
    also - quoque

    So, I'd say: Gratias! Omnia quoque desideravi. Or Gratias! Omnes quoque desideravi. A literal translation would be: Thanks! I also missed all/everyone.

    Hope this helps! (And anyone else who needs the above translations, go for it! )
    ~Ari

    PS - On page three or something of the original Latin thread, someone asked if derum is a word. I couldn't find anything, but I know that in The Aeneid, Vergil uses deumin place of deorum (of the gods). Maybe someone was attempting to do the same thing with derum? Just a thought.

  2. #12
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Hi!
    How would one say "meant to be" in Latin?
    Not for a spell, just a throw-away insult type of line.
    Thanks!
    ~Gina

  3. #13
    Laurskii
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    Well Cicero had a line in "De Fato" that basically means 'Everything happens because of fate." It's "Omnia Fato Fiunt."

    That's the best I can come up with. There's always "Est in Fatis" or "Est in fortuna" which is "it is in fate/fortune." But I haven't taken Latin in ages and couldn't promise that it's accurate grammatically.

    (: Laur

  4. #14
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Thank you so much, Laur! I think I am going to use "Est in Fatis" as that works and sounds the best. I appreciate the help as I would have completely mangled it!
    ~Gina

  5. #15
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    Shoot, I hate double posting but it appears I have the next Latin question.

    How would I use the Latin 'rumpo' with 'animus'? I know 'animus' is masculine and I think I'd like it to be an active form, present tense - I know nothing about conjugating Latin verbs, though, so even though I can find a list online, what would be best? I'd like it to mean something along the lines of 'shatter' so is this even the best word? What about 'frango'? Does anyone have any ideas?

    Thank you!!
    ~Gina

  6. #16
    Laurskii
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    Gina - What exactly are you trying to say? I understand it's something to the effect of a spirit (or courage, intellect, etc) being broken (or shattered, fragmented, etc), but if you could word the sentence for me in English, translating it would be a lot easier.

  7. #17
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurskii
    Gina - What exactly are you trying to say? I understand it's something to the effect of a spirit (or courage, intellect, etc) being broken (or shattered, fragmented, etc), but if you could word the sentence for me in English, translating it would be a lot easier.
    Well, it's not so much a sentence as a spell (of course, lol.) I actually ended up going with 'Frango' and using 'Frangitis Animus' as my spell, which I wanted to mean something like "Shattered Soul." Does that even come close to any sort of correct conjugation and meaning?
    Thanks!!
    ~Gina

  8. #18
    Virgil
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    For shattering, I quite like the word "Quasso" which is a verb that literally means "I break down/shake violently" The spell could be something like quasso animum (I suppose you could say "animus" or "animo" or whatever you find that you like more, but animum would be correct if you're going for grammar.)

    Peace,
    Virgil

    P.S. If you prefer the verb "frango" (it basically has the same meaning) frangitis might not be the best way to conjugate it, since it's the second person plural - you shatter. I'd keep it as "Frango" or maybe "Frangite" which is the imperative (like you're telling it to shatter.)

    Or you could go with the fourth principle part, fractus (I believe that's where we get the English word "fraction" from) and say something like fracta animum, although I'm not sure if that's good grammar. Then again, Harry Potter spells are almost never in correct Latin anyways.

  9. #19
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    Virgil,
    My apologies for a late reply! I am just wrapping up the story now. I like 'frango' so I will use one of your suggestions for that verb as it just seems to fit better. I really appreciate your help! Thanks!
    ~Gina

  10. #20
    Midnight Storm
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    In Latin class at school, we've learnt to say the best line ever:

    'vescere bracis meis'

    It is useful in almost any situation.

    'eat my shorts'

    Just thought I'd put it out there

    ~Midnight Storm

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