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Thread: GERMAN Language Help

  1. #21
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
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    More translations

    Wow. Thank you for all of the German help, luinrina!

    Once again, I have some more things that I need help translating/correcting...

    Deutsche Zauberaufgabe-Gruppe: I believe this is "German Wizard Task Group" or something like that. This is the pre-Grindelwald Auror-equivalent group that was liquidated in 1933 and replaced by the Mitternachtsmannschaft. Before the purge, the members of this group were called Dzaggers, formed out of a skewed acronym: Deutsche Zauberaufgabe-Gruppe.

    Zauberereich-Kanzler für Magie: I'm not too confident about this translation, but this is Grindelwald's title/position, the "Wizarding Reich Chancellor for Magic." Please correct me if I'm wrong. Also, if you have any ideas of your own on what Grindelwald's title should be, that would be lovely.

    To return to the Schnell! vs. Schneller! issue, how would you use them as short, barked command? Just scream "Schnell!" if you want someone to go faster, and "Schneller!" for them to move even faster? Or is one favoured over the other when it comes to ordering people around?

    And lastly, how would you say as a command, "Muggles, out!"? I just think that "Mehrere Muggel, heraus!" doesn't sound right.

    Once again, thank you for helping me think up the minute details for my story!

    Tim the Enchanter

    PS: Oh yes, I forgot something! Would Grindelwald's empire use Galleons, Sickles, and Knuts as currency? The Harry Potter books never say whether those coins are specific to Britain or if they're used throughout magical Europe.

    So, assuming that the Zauberereich used its own currency, what would you call it? The Zauberereichsmark? (and would it be decimal based?)

  2. #22
    Honigkuchenpferd Hufflepuff
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    *rubs hands* Let's see what we can do with this...

    Deutsche Zauberaufgabe-Gruppe
    *slight cringes* It sounds... weird, but it is grammatically correct when translating "German Wizard Task Group". You can keep it like you have it. Also, I like the name they were called, Dzaggers. It doesn't sound completely German, but has a special ring to it. So go with it.

    Zauberereich-Kanzler für Magie
    It sounds a bit too pompeous. Also, it's doubled with "Zauber-" and "Magie"; both is more or less the same in the meaning. I'd just take "Kanzler für Magie" [Chancellor for Magic], "Zauberreich Kanzler" [Wizarding Reich Chancellor] or (my least favourite) "Magischer Kanzler" [Magical Chancellor]. My opinion: take "Zauberreich Kanzler"; it sounds best, to me at least.

    Schnell! vs. Schneller!
    I favour "Schneller!" as a command. It even mustn't have to do something with people already moving fast and urging them to go even faster, but that's just what I say. But what is used even more often than "Schneller!" is "Los!" or "Los jetzt!". Even "Bewegung!" or "Beweg dich (endlich)!" are well-used in Germany. They all mean to move faster in sense, so you're safe when using them, too, next to "Schneller!".

    Muggles, out!
    Yep, "Mehrere Muggel, heraus!" is wrong in that case. The translation must be "Muggel raus!" if you mean that they want the Muggles out of Aryan country or if you want your characters to address the Muggles with the order to leave houses for example, then it's "Muggel, raus!" (yes, a tiny comma changes meanings ).

    Also, when I read your already first two chapters that have been validated, I noticed a mistake with the German, which was my fault. When you asked about Raus vs. Heraus, I didn't know in which context you're using the word. Now, having seen it, "raus" is more appropriate.

    The heated, noisy mob then followed the Party official out of Adolf Hitler Platz. They thundered down the dark cobbled streets the short distance to Kartoffel-Straße, shouting cries of “Juden, heraus!”
    The "Juden, heraus!" must be "Juden, raus!". Sorry about that. The "raus" was already known at that time (sorry if that hadn't been clear), but it's more used in the slang. Also, when someone is shouting to somebody to get/come out, it's used as well. In this case (above paragraph), it's "Juden, raus!". Would be great if you could change that.

    I'm really sorry about the confusion. Just a tip for future posts: it would really help me to help you if you tried to give a context for little words like that, like you did with the Schnell vs. Schneller in your last post. That already helps a great deal. Thanks.

    the currency
    *ponders* To be honest, I have no idea. Galleons, Sickles and Knut sound very English, and your term of Zauberereichsmark sounds quite verified. Additionally, the Muggle German currency at that time was the Reichsmark and Pfennig, so... *shrugs* I think you can go with Zauberreichsmark. And 100 Pfennige = 1 Reichsmark. You can make it the same with the magical currency if you want.

    I hope that helps.

    ~Bine

    PS: My author name is written in lower case, luinrina. But you're always welcome to just call me Bine. And thanks for the second PS.
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  3. #23
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    Could a native German-speaker be so kind as to translate the following for me? This is spoken in the 1850s and in Vienna, if it makes a difference.

    “A promise should never be broken. We will be sorry to lack your pleasant conversation, Egon, but do go meet your friend.”

    Many thanks in advance.

    Edit: *pickles Bine back and goes to PM*
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  4. #24
    Honigkuchenpferd Hufflepuff
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    Guten Morgen, Ayse. *pickles*

    So, here's your translation:

    Ein Versprechen sollte nie gebrochen werden. Wir werden den Verlust unserer angenehmen Unterhaltung bedauern, Egon, doch geh um deinen Freund zu treffen.

    I just noticed something though. Are Egon and the character (who speaks that) very friendly with each other meaning do they know each other very well? Have they been friends for years? If they don't, than the second sentence changes to this:

    Wir werden den Verlust unserer angenehmen Unterhaltung bedauern, Egon, doch gehen Sie um Ihren Freund zu treffen.

    You see, in German we have two translation possibilities for "you". And the level of acquaintanceship dictates which "you"-translation you have to use.

    If you're unsure which one of the two you should take, PM me. I guess it's for your story In the Twilight (or something <.< - can't remember the correct title now). I could go and read what you already have to tell you which one of the two possibilities is what you need.

    Hope to have helped,

    ~Bine
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  5. #25
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    Guten Tag!

    I have a question (obviously, that's why I'm here). I'm trying to think of a colloquial term for the sign of the Deathly Hallows/Grindelwald's emblem. In my story, Für Das Größere Wohl, I don't want to have to constantly refer to it as "Grindelwald's symbol" or "the symbol of the Second Wizarding Reich," so I'd like to have some advice on something easy to call it.

    The only thing I've come up with so far was just cobbling together the (Babel Fish-translated) words for triangle and eye - Dreieckauge

    Is this correct? More importantly, does anyone have any better names to call Grindelwald's symbol?

    Also, I'm wondering what to call the German equivalent of the Ministry of Magic - what I came up with was Volkskabinett des Zauberereichs, which is what should be "People's Cabinet of the Wizarding Reich." However, I have little confidence in my internet translations skills (if you can even call them that), so I would greatly appreciate any corrections or suggestions for better names.

    Tim the Enchanter

  6. #26
    Raffles
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    Hi Tim,
    I see that you posted your question quite a while ago, but if you still need the the answers I think I can help.
    Dreieckauge: I would make a minor change in this one. I would use Dreiecksauge instead.
    For the ministry of magic, in the german books they call it 'Ministerium Für Zauberei' or Zauberminesterium. Fudge is therefore 'der Minister für Zauberei'. I think in your story you want it to be about 'Das Dritte Reich' if I am correct, so maybe 'Ministerium Für das Zaubereich' would work?
    I hoped that helped,

    Otherwise, I would also like to advertise my services. I am fluent in german, and I can translate anything that comes my way

    Raffles,

  7. #27
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Volkskabinett sounds good, also something with Reich in it would fit the time... Reichszaubereikabinett... We Germans like long words
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  8. #28
    Azhure
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    Hi!

    I was just wondering if the following sentence makes sense:

    Zwei Wochen lang habe ich im Krankenhaus schrecklichen Essen gegessen.

    Thanks! Hopefully I didn't mangle the sentence to pieces...

    Edit: Thanks, Raffles. I always forget which gender to use on which noun. Thanks again!

  9. #29
    Raffles
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    Hello,

    Zwei Wochen lang habe ich im Krankenhaus schreckliches Essen gegessen.
    There is just a minor error in this. There is an 's' instead of an 'n' because 'Essen' is a 'das' word (not feminine or masculin) ('Das Essen' instead of 'Der Essen')

    There is a 'gender' for each noun: der (masculine) die(feminine) and das (not feminine or masculin) and the adjective reflect on the gender.

    Hope I helped,
    Raffles

  10. #30
    Seventh Year Gryffindor
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    Also - just in case that wasn't your intention - with the word order you chose, you put a lot of emphasis on the "Zwei Wochen". A bit like "I had to eat that horrible food for a whole two weeks!"
    It works very fine though if that's what you wanted it to be.
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