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Thread: U.S.A. Culture and Language Help - II

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  1. #1
    padfoot_returns
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    U.S.A. Culture and Language Help - II

    This is the thread to ask question about American culture. You can find the first thread here

    The last question that was asked was by Celtic_Jewel and she asked:
    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Jewel
    Hi, I was wondering, what would you call your grandparents? For instance, I call them Grandma and Grandad, but my cousins all call my Grandma Nana. In a few books, I've read of the grandfather being called 'Pop', but I'm not sure how true that is. The family is in Florida, by the way.

    Any help would be amazing,
    -Ema
    The answers she received were:

    Quote Originally Posted by Inverarity
    "Pop" is usually used for your father, not your grandfather. But some people call their grandfather "Grandpop."

    It's somewhat regional. Grandma/Grandpa is most common, but Gramma/Grampa is used in some areas (that's really a variant pronunciation rather than a different word, though). Grandfather/Grandmother would be very formal as a way to address your own grandparents. "Gramps" for Grandfather is also sometimes used, though it's very informal/diminutive, and only used if you can get away with being that affectionate (or disrespectful).

    I know some Southerners, but not all, use "Nana" for grandmother. I don't know how common that is.

    One thing you won't hear in the U.S. is "Grandmum." But sometimes "Grandmom."
    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    But also, just like Nana is a less common used word, you might also hear Papi for their grandfather.

    And if it helps, Gramma and Grampa is considered somewhat of a Midwestern or rural variant of Grandma and Grandpa. Some families even invent their own words for their grandparents.
    Quote Originally Posted by mahogany_wand
    Personally, I call my grandparents "Grandma" and "Grandpa". I have heard of grandmothers being called Nana, so that's pretty common too. "Pop" was used back in the 18-1900s, although people still use it in the deep south. Not us northerners, though.

    A lot of children make up names for their grandparents, too.

    Hope this helps!

    ~M_W
    Carry on

    xxRiham

  2. #2
    Rhi for HP
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    Oh, and there's also Granddad. I have two sets of grandparents, so one set is Grandma/Grandpa, the other is Nana/Granddad.

  3. #3
    moonys-muggle
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    Originally Posted by Celtic_Jewel
    Hi, I was wondering, what would you call your grandparents? For instance, I call them Grandma and Grandad, but my cousins all call my Grandma Nana. In a few books, I've read of the grandfather being called 'Pop', but I'm not sure how true that is. The family is in Florida, by the way.

    Any help would be amazing,
    -Ema
    I am on the west coast and the majority of people use Grandma and Grandpa.

  4. #4
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    Ema,

    Maybe if you told us what part of the U.S. you're looking into, we might be able to give you a better idea of the words you will need. We might even be able to give you some other help with regional dialect.

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  5. #5
    Inverarity
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    She said Florida.

    Parts of Florida use a Southern dialect, while other parts (around the big cities, down in the Keys, etc.) are more metropolitan and use the "standard" dialect mostly heard on TV (what I call "West Coast news anchor dialect").

  6. #6
    Celtic_Jewel
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    I've decided to go with Grandpop and Grandmom. Thanks for all the help!

    -Ema

  7. #7
    emck
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    So basically, I have no idea how schools, esp. junior schools, in America work. I need details.

    Firstly, what age must you be to start school? Is there a certain date that you have to turn that age by? (I.E. here, you have to turn six before the 31st of July to start grade one)

    Do you have a mandatory/volantary prep or preschool year?

    I also don't really get the whole 'middle school' thing. Explain, please.

    How old are you when you graduate?

    And finally, if someone was born in mid-September, 1991, what year would they be in now?

    I think that might be all, for now. Thanks!

  8. #8
    Inverarity
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    Quote Originally Posted by emck
    Firstly, what age must you be to start school? Is there a certain date that you have to turn that age by? (I.E. here, you have to turn six before the 31st of July to start grade one)
    Kindergarten is optional, but most kids start there, usually at age five or six. Age requirements vary somewhat by state and district; there is no universal rule.

    The following year, 1st grade (age 6-7), is when mandatory primary school education begins.

    Do you have a mandatory/volantary prep or preschool year?

    See above. Almost everyone goes to kindergarten, and it's usually free, but it's not mandatory.

    I also don't really get the whole 'middle school' thing. Explain, please.

    Middle school consists of the grades between elementary school and high school (also called "Jr. High School" in a few places, like California, but "middle school" is more common.)

    But it can be confusing, because exactly what grades constitute middle school also varies by state and by district.

    Grades 1-5 are always elementary school.
    Some middle schools start at grade 6, some at 7 or 8.
    High school usually starts at grades 9 or 10.

    So, depending on the division in your particular school district, it could look like any of the following:

    Elementary school: 1-6
    Middle school: 7-8
    High school: 9-12

    Elementary school: 1-6
    Middle school: 7-9
    High school: 10-12

    Elementary school: 1-5
    Middle school: 6-8
    High school: 9-12

    There are probably other permutations that exist.

    Usually elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools are on three separate campuses, but sometimes (in smaller districts) the middle school shares a campus with either elementary school (in which case the middle schoolers tend to bully the younger kids) or high school (in which case they tend to get bullied by the older kids).

    How old are you when you graduate?

    17 or 18. Which means yes, some high school students are legal adults and can write their own excuse notes for missing class.

    And finally, if someone was born in mid-September, 1991, what year would they be in now?

    Probably a senior (12th grade), but possibly a junior (11th grade).

  9. #9
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    Do you have a mandatory/volantary prep or preschool year?
    Kindergarten is when mandatory schooling starts, but before that, there is what is call preschool or pre-k (usually for children who are three or four). This type of school is almost always private, sometimes run as small businesses or out of peoples own homes. Little kid here sing songs, learn to count to ten, color, and cut paper. It's not an especially strenuous time.

    I also don't really get the whole 'middle school' thing. Explain, please.
    Middle school is somewhat similar to secondary school. It's also called junior high.

    Basically, the idea of it is if you mix the twelve-year-olds in with the eighteen-year-olds, there won't be any twelve-year-old left by Christmas. So, they have they own smaller school that they go to until they're older and people won't feel as guilty when they are thrown to the wolves.

    My towns school system worked like this.
    Elementary School
    K-6

    Middle School
    7-8

    High School
    9-12

    But also, like Inverarity said, it depends on the district. A good plan may be to look up a few school websites to get a better idea.

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  10. #10
    A.H.
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    I also don't really get the whole 'middle school' thing. Explain, please.

    Twas explained pretty thoroughly above me, but in some states, the division gets even more complicated and weird. When I was in fourth grade, I went to an intermediate school. Which was grades four through six. So, in that town there was

    Preschool (Don't even remember the ages for this)
    Elementary 1-3
    Intermediate 4-6
    Middle/Jr. High 7-8
    High School 9-12

    But that's most likely one of only a very few towns that have an Intermediate School. It was done like that in the first place because the population rose, the Middle school got too many students, and the school wasn't big enough to house all the students coming in. So they made another one.

    /.2

    -Ari-

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