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Thread: Being British: Thread the Tenth

  1. #131
    apollo13
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    My dining room is multipurpose too, it also has a piano, and until a few years ago the computer was in there too. It also has a small sofa/loveseat and an old telly. We really only use it for that. :P

    ~Evie

  2. #132
    Celtic_Jewel
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    My dining room is rather different to everyone elses, it seems. We just have a big table and six chairs in there, but then our kitchen is too small to eat in so perhaps that's why. Snarky is a word I've heard and know, but I don't use it a lot and neither do my friends. :P

    Hope I helped,
    -Ema

  3. #133
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    I have an opinion question, the more people who answer, the better.

    In general, how to British people percive Aussies (I'm an American, so don't sugar-coat it because you're afraid of hurt feelings). Of course, if someone wants to take a snape at Canadians (double points for French and English Canada) and Americans too, well free.

    Yes, I, OliveOil_Med is on a mission to map out the wizarding world. So no thread will be left unturned.

    But for now, I just need general opinions of Americams, Aussies, Canadians. Let's just try to have a nice open disguissiom between us. For my story, what I heed i for Hermione to arriveing Australia, and have it br convincing, but not over the top. Epecially when she meets the city locals and her house guests.


    Also, are ten year old girls In Britain just as obsessed over Hannah Montana as the are in Australia and America. or no?

    And what it is that ten year-old-girls play with today?

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  4. #134
    CakeorDeath
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    *is skyving of from revision*


    Austrailians?

    On the opposite side of the world but still quite a lot of austrailians come over here. For most people in London, they are barstaff but also a lot of them teach as well. There is a lot of sport rivaly, like the Ashes or Rugby.

    Sterotypes are that they are loud, obnoxious and drunk. Not true but they do rather annoyingly walk aound bare foot in summer. This is britain!


    Americans?

    Post-Bush we've moved on from laughing at you about politics and are now once again soley focused on the issue of your butchering of our language!

    Sterotypes are that you are all scarily christian or hippy-dippy spirtual, all homophobic or gay, and you all have guns. Also you're fat (sorry), stupid (sorry) and you don't get tea (no aplogies - you deserve everything you get). Also you say bathroom, we say toilet; sidewalk, pavement etc.


    Canadians?

    Stuff I know about Canada:
    There is a lot of snow.
    They speak french as well as english.
    They're not as right wing as parts of America.
    There are hardly any people there.

    Erm oh, yeah Anne of Green Gables.

    *Is embarased*

    Granted geogrphy isn't my strong point but Canada isn't on most people's radar. No offense.

  5. #135
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Hiya,

    Molly, I have an 11 year old girl and a 6 year old that I've had to take to the HM movie. However they both thought it was a bit cheesy . They do like Hannah Montana but the eldest one likes other groups that are a bit 'older' as it were. She plays on the computer (Sims) or her Nintendo DS. She does read but doesn't 'play' with toys as such. She's more likely to be plugged into an ipod.

    Australians - in general our opinion (I think) is really good. We see them as relaxed, warm, funny but also quite argumentative - especially if their Rugby team is being beaten by the South Africans (LOL). In London where I live there's a lot of rivalry between Aussies and Australians.

    Americans - Hmm, right I can't speak for everyone (and not teenagers) but the view of americans isn't really that complimentary. I must say that myself and husband don't share the view - we both love America and want to live there - but opinions gleaned from newspapers are that you're fairly shallow, obsessed with the body beautiful (Paris Hilton) or else obsessed with religion (bible belt). We didn't like Bush but I think we like Obama (hopeful about Obama).

    Canadians - Ummmm, sorry no real opinion. They're like gentler Americans (hee hee). I do know a French Canadian and she's lovely ... but that's it.


    Carole
    xxx

    Banner by the fabulous Julia - theoplaeye

  6. #136
    apollo13
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    Sadly most teenagers here have the opinion that Canada is a state in America.

    Believe me, a shocking amount of people in my Geography class thought that. Then again, one of them did point at India and said, "that's London, isn't it?", so I guess I'm just is the thick group for some reason.

    ~Evie

  7. #137
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    It only feels like yesterday when I was ten, but yet it is five years ago.

    When I was younger I was the child who played on the Sims (and still does), my PSP, Xbox, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, these are still quite valuable pieces of technology to pass the time, also I spent a lot of time on here, and reading any book I could get my hands on.

    Needless to say I was never a typical ten year old girl, who would be more interested in make-up than the above, I think I've reached that stage now!

  8. #138
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    I need to know about the British underground (or subway, as it's called in America). I have never been on one, so I need to know a lot of details.

    How do you pay for it? Do you have metro cards, tokens, or do you just pay cash? Do people still take payment methods, or has that job been handed over to machines?

    Can anyone point me in the directions of some good images of the trains and their interiors? The underground itself? How about the website for the London underground?

    Brand New Story!

    Banner by lullaby_BANG. Completely awesome avi came from here!

    My brand new trailer for Snape Didn't Die by thegirllikeme to serve as a constant source of inspiration whilst I write!

  9. #139
    apollo13
    Guest
    You can pay in cash if you want, but if you get the tube a lot, you can get an Oyster card. If you want a real laugh, look up the song "London Underground" by Amatuer Transplants, but watch out for typical British swearing. :P
    It is mainly machine, but there are still odd humans dotted about to help.

    Here is the official website: Edit by mudbloodproud: Link removed. Please do not link to outside webpages.

    EDIT: I don't like arguing but - even if they ask for it? o.O



    ~Evie

  10. #140
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    You can use cash to get a ticket at either a ticket machine or from a real life person (assuming the queues aren't too awful).

    Oyster cars as Evie says are the best way of getting around London. They're like credit cards or mobile cards that you top up with money and then just press on a moniter so the barrier opens and it automatically debits the money. You can use them on buses too.

    Carole
    xxx

    Banner by the fabulous Julia - theoplaeye

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