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Thread: Being British: Thread the Tenth

  1. #21
    Doctor Phoenix
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    Thanks so much! I think I will go with Hythe (which is an awesome name, by the way. Why doesn't America have such cool-sounding places?).

  2. #22
    Mistletoe
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    Okay, so, I have a strange question.... Are redwood trees common in Britain? If not, what are some other large trees that inhabit the area?

    --Kat

  3. #23
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    No, we don't have Redwood trees here *goes to check google just in case*- well not growing in the wild- there are some cultivated in places like Kew Gardens.

    Our biggest tree is probably the Oak tree. This can grow very tall and very broad. We used to have a lot of Elm trees which are tall and thin but a lot were wiped out in the 70's by something called Dutch Elm disease. So whilst we still have Elms the new ones aren't very tall...yet.

    Hope that helps

    Carole
    xxx
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

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  4. #24
    apollo13
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    Fir trees and pine trees too, are very common. Also birch, willow and beech. Of course, if you're describing a graveyard, it's best to stick a yew in somewhere, because they're supposed to be the trees of death.

    ~Evie

  5. #25
    Sixth Year Hufflepuff
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    Hello!

    I really need to know the name of a really cold place in England. I have a story where I need to get my characters stranded in a very cold place. So... will York do or is there a colder place?

    Thank you!
    ~ Pooja

    AMAZING story banner by Nadia/majestic_ginny! Dimply Sammeh by me.
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  6. #26
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Yeah, Yorkshires's pretty cold especially on the Moors but I think Cumbria or Scotland are much colder. In Cumbria (also called The Lake District.) there are lots of little villagey places if you wanted them to get cut off. Shap is one that frequently gets cut off in the winter- it's near Penrith and Carlisle (I used to live in Carlisle that's how I know).

    Carole
    xxx
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

    Banner by minnabird

  7. #27
    apollo13
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    Pretty much anywhere in the UK, to be honest, in the winter months. A lot of the time it's really bitterly cold, but not quite cold enough to snow loads. It's more the wind that makes it cold than the actual temperature. Generally the North West is the coldest, and the South East is the warmest.

    At night, when it's windy or raining, particularly in the North West, people can die of hypothermia if they are not wrapped up warm. Homless people often die of exposure, too.

    ~Evie

  8. #28
    mahogany_wand
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    Horse or pony breeds?

    I'm writing a where my characters are trotting along in the countryside in Scotland, but I don't know any horse or pony breeds that are native there! I just want to get a basic taste of the breeds' standards, so that I can use lots of adjectives. I mean, I don't want a couple of well bred British girls galloping along on a couple of appaloosas or mustangs, do I? Thanks!

    ~M_W

  9. #29
    nysuperstarz
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    I have a few questions/requests.

    I need a common brandname for bottled water. Over here, at least in New York, Poland Spring is the most common, but I need something thats common over in Britain.

    Also, I need a brandname for a backpack; do you guys have JanSport over there?

    And, what kind of daylight savings schedule do you have? Or if its easier, what is the time difference between New York and Britain in the month of October?

    Plus, how big of a holiday is Halloween in Britain? Do you go trick-or-treating and that whole deal the way Americans do?

    Oh and do you call the hair that would come up on the forehead "bangs" or a "fringe"?

    I have a feeling I'll be using this thread very often in the next month seeing my main character is a Brit who goes to New York.

    <3tehroop.

  10. #30
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Hello

    Here are some answers for you

    I'm writing a where my characters are trotting along in the countryside in Scotland, but I don't know any horse or pony breeds that are native there! There's a breed called the Highland Pony (13 - 14 hands)and also the Moorland. Avoid Clydesdales- they're HUGE!

    need a common brandname for bottled water. Over here, at least in New York, Poland Spring is the most common, but I need something thats common over in Britain.
    We drink a lot of French ones (sparkling) like Perrier and Evian. Most popular British one (still) is Highland Spring.

    Also, I need a brandname for a backpack; do you guys have JanSport over there?
    Not heard of JanSport ....will get back to you on this.
    EDIT- If it's a girl try Roxy, if it's a boy (or it doesn't matter) try Osprey.
    Roxy are quite funky, Osprey look cool.


    And, what kind of daylight savings schedule do you have? Or if its easier, what is the time difference between New York and Britain in the month of October?
    Generally the time difference is 5 hours. In GB we have GMT(Greenwich Mean time) and BST (British Summer Time) Our clocks go forward an hour at the end of March (BST_ (round about 20th) and back an hour at the end of October. I don't know if this impacts on any Daylight savings times you have.

    Plus, how big of a holiday is Halloween in Britain? Do you go trick-or-treating and that whole deal the way Americans do? It's becoming bigger but it's not that popular amongst the older generation. For some it's just an excuse to chuck eggs and harrass old people although younger kids and responsible adults do dress up and have fun. They do go trick or treating. Sorry I'm a bit of a Halloween Scrooge (Call me Argus Filch )

    Oh and do you call the hair that would come up on the forehead "bangs" or a "fringe"? FRINGE- ever time

    Hope this helps

    Carole
    xxx
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

    Banner by minnabird

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