Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: How do Parent's Know What House their Kids Are in?

  1. #11
    quibblequill
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by leahsm2
    Can you imagine the glee at the Dursley household if some random owl showed up congratulating them on Harry's selection into Gryffindor? Could be fun!
    leahsm2, I believe you've inspired me. *grins evilly* Oh I'll have fun with this.............

  2. #12
    Stubbornly_appeared
    Guest

    Automated system?

    Haha, the Dursley's getting random mail from Hogwarts would be hilarious.

    I've always assumed that a good kid would send their parents a letter, but there are probably a couple of mummies and daddies that won't know until lazy Johnny sends them a letter or they send him one themselves asking.

    There must be some sort of way that parents know, then. Molly sent Ron a Howler in CoS the morning after the Sorting, and in the end she gave Ginny props for getting into Gryffindor.

    My personal verdict: the kids tell them, older siblings tell them, or there's a network or something that alerts parents.

  3. #13
    The Canon Queen Hufflepuff
    Unspeakable
    Hermione Couldn’t Possibly Be In Two Places At Once
    mudbloodproud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    With Sirius on his flying bike
    Posts
    1,209
    Originally posted by Stubbornly_appeared
    There must be some sort of way that parents know, then. Molly sent Ron a Howler in CoS the morning after the Sorting, and in the end she gave Ginny props for getting into Gryffindor.
    This only happened in the movie, not in the book. In the book, the Howler only berated Ron for stealing the car the burst into flames.

    I had the same thought when I first thought about this question, but then I couldn't remember it happening in the book, so I pulled the book off my shelves and looked. It happens in chapter 6 if you are interested.
    Terri Black (as in Mrs Sirius {aka Padfoot} Black)
    Hufflepuff Head of House


  4. #14
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    1. We've all read PS/SS. (Well, most of us, anyway). Where does it say that they wrote letters on the first day? No where. On the first day they got lectured. Just trying to stick with the canon...

    Well...there's what I'd regard as an inconsistency here, which is that term starts on the first of September according to the letter, and yet they arrive at Hogwarts on the first, and their actual first day is the second of September. Given that it is possible for either or both of the first two days to fall before a saturday/sunday, they would have plenty of time for letters. So either the Hogwarts Express leaves/arrives on the first (seemingly closest to canon), term classes start on the first: with the Express arriving the day before, or classes start on the first monday of September, and the pupils arrive on the first (my preferred storytelling device).

    Anyway, they certainly didn't write on the first night, but they might have written on the 2nd. They could always go up and write at lunchtime, or after classes. I know Harry and Ron didn't, but who's Harry going to write to? Equally, why should Ron write if he knows that Percy will do it for him (and, frankly, I doubt many eleven-year-old boys would be writing to their parents on the first day of school).

    I, too, agree that the children would be expected/required to write to their parents themselves. Perhaps it would be part of their first period on the first day or something? These kids are only eleven, they may need a bit of push and some help with their wording/phrasing/spelling

    2. I'm pretty sure that spelling isn't the most important subject at Hogwarts. As long as you can correctly pronounce a spell, there's no need to spell it. (sorry for the bad pun, it was unintentional).

    Indeed, and that sort of thing is generally suggested to be taught by the parents in their children's pre-Hogwarts years. Aside from which, the idea of being forced to write letters home seems a little authoritarian to me, even if canon evidence didn't point to the contrary.

    We've all read the fic where one kid's parents wanted them in whatever House, and the kid gets sorted into a different one. Do you really think the student can't lie???? They wouldn't be compelled to tell the truth (well, not all of them anyway) if they knew they'd have heck to pay.

    I don't suppose that lieing would be particularly common, really. Students in the "wrong" house would either be like Sirius; who couldn't care less and wouldn't write anyway, Albus-Severus; whose parents would be understanding, or those bullied into the wanting to appease their parents; and going from that sort of relationship into a liar on the first day is something of character swing. I suppose it's possible, but it seems unlikely.

    There must be some sort of way that parents know, then. Molly sent Ron a Howler in CoS the morning after the Sorting, and in the end she gave Ginny props for getting into Gryffindor.

    Why did Molly send the howler? Because she received a letter from Professor Dumbledore/McGonagall (book/film) telling her about the car. It's likely in that particular case that they also mentioned Ginny. Albus and Minerva know Molly, after all, and it did rather make a "full set".

    Anyway...

    My personal verdict: Certain children would write to their parents, probably as a reply with the parents writing first, and inform them of what house they had been sorted into. This is likely to happen somewhere between the third day and the end of the first month.
    Percy and his ilk would probably write back to the parents instead of the younger siblings.
    Eleven-year-old boys, in a new environment, who are trying to make friends, do not write home to their mothers.
    Staff who are familiar with certain parents MAY write to the parents and explain on a personal level, but not as part of their staff role.

  5. #15
    Kcharles
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by AurorKeefy

    Anyway...

    My personal verdict: Certain children would write to their parents, probably as a reply with the parents writing first, and inform them of what house they had been sorted into. This is likely to happen somewhere between the third day and the end of the first month.
    Percy and his ilk would probably write back to the parents instead of the younger siblings.
    Eleven-year-old boys, in a new environment, who are trying to make friends, do not write home to their mothers.
    Staff who are familiar with certain parents MAY write to the parents and explain on a personal level, but not as part of their staff role.
    Well said! I think that that is very correct, and it fits into cannon very well. I'd go with this if I were you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •