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Thread: Being British: Act IX

  1. #51
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    I would just like to add to CoolH500 and Equinox Chick, where I'm from you have and I mean HAVE to sit your theory in either the Civic Center or in the Town Hall, where people from the council work,(people who run the city). I don't know if this applies to everywhere I just know it has to be done where I live.

    - Hana

  2. #52
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    I'm writing a 19th century fic that takes place in Britain, and I can do with all sorts of recommendations about the culture and environment specifically in London by that time. I'd be very grateful if any Brit can provide me with link, book title, etc. on that point, or share his/her knowladge on the points. What I especially need to know is everyday occurances; life on the streets, manners of speech between social classes, what a dinner table looked like, etc.

    Thanks a lot in advance.
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  3. #53
    Heather25x
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    I would say - read a Jane Austen book lol. Seriously. Factual books tend to skim on the whole social side of things, like dinner parties etc. So yeah, i would recommend reading a book by Jane Austen or another author around that time. My recommendation would be fictional but i suppose other people will have ther opinions

    I would post stuff here about the 19th century but it would be too long. It'd be easier for you if you read up on it.

    I hope that was somewhat helpful lol.


    ~Heather

  4. #54
    emmaholloway
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    Charles Dickens too, but he focuses pretty much on the opposite side of the social spectrum to Jane Austen, and is more focused on London.

    By the begining of the 19th century Britain had just undergone the industrial revolution.
    There is alot of information about that here

    Want to know about fashion? Try here

    The King at the beginning of the century was George III, then George IV in 1820, then William IV from 1830 and then from 1837 was Queen Victoria.

  5. #55
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    Jane Austen is excellent for the social standing of the middle and upper classes. She deals brilliantly with what they call landed gentry and the importance of being a 'gentleman' or a 'lady'.

    Dickens is very Victorian- his working class portrayals are excellent and he's very good at exposing hypocrisy.

    I think it depends very much on which class you're focusing on. If you were poor in those times you were very poor.

    Here are some points I remember from my history class.

    If you couldn't eat you went to the workhouse and often people died there.
    Lots of prostitution, lots of gin drinking amongst the lower classes. Hogarths portrait Gin Lane is a good portrait to look at.
    Plumbing in London was still awful. Cholera and typhoid and TB were rife. Many children would not survive beyond the age of 5.
    The industrial revolution brought in a lot of people from the rural areas who were looking for work- they often didn't find it.
    The French revolution coupled with the industrial revolution caused unrest here.
    The Royal family were not very popular. Queen Victoria survived at least 7 assassination attempts. Towards the end of her reign when she'd formed an Empire she was well-loved.
    Also convicts around this time were shipped off to Australia.

    Sorry can't think of a book to recommend but if you have a specific question I'll try and help.
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  6. #56
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    Thank you all for the suggestions, tips and the links. They were all helpful.

    I have one specific question: I read that there was a strong prejudice towards the Irish among the British upper-classes by that time. In that context, do you think a young wizard artist would willingly go and work with an Irish painter? I'd like to think that the Wizarding community was not a complete mirror of the Muggle community in terms of social life and/or stratification, so does it make sense if I make it clear that the British and Irish wizards did not share the Muggles' prejudices?
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  7. #57
    poolycat
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    Hi, I'm not sure how strong the prejudice was against the Irish in the 19th century. But Ireland is majority Catholic (especially in the south) very upper class britain tends to be Church of England (protestant), there has been some prejudice between the two denominations since the church of england was created so it is likely the prejudice you mean will have come from this. So for a wizard there shouldn't really be much prejudice as they don't seem to have any religious belief.

    For politics around prejudices against the Irish at that time try looking up the 'Irish Government Bill 1886' and the 'Second Irish Home Rule Bill 1894' the arguments against them will give you an idea of upper class conservative prejudices.

    Hope this helps and isn't too confusing

  8. #58
    Kristen Floss
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    Well, they were caused by religion. And as wizards don't have a religion, I don't think they'd be overly bothered.

    Hope I helped!

    Kristen xD

  9. #59
    Wizengamot Hufflepuff
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    I
    have one specific question: I read that there was a strong prejudice towards the Irish among the British upper-classes by that time.
    I think there was a prejudice generally against the Irish more pronounced in the working classes. This is certainly true around 1845 because of the Irish Potato Famine. Basically the Irish didn't have anything to eat and were literally starving to death. This resulted in many of them emigrating to Britain and America. They tended to come to cities for work but were competeing with many other people who'd fled the country following the Industrial revolution.

    Amongst the Upper Classes I don't think there'd be a specific prejudice against the Irish - just a prejudice against the working class! The upper-classes have always been generous patrons of the Arts so as long as your Irish painter was talented I think they'd be quite enamoured of him. They probably wouldn't want their daughter to marry him but they'd quite willingly have him in the house. I don't see a problem with your wizard artist going to work with him at all.
    I'm a BARMAID. I write. I drabble. I duel. I poet. I'm a BADGER!!!

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  10. #60
    Kcharles
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    Is the word "couch" British? And if it's not, what would be used?

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