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Thread: Being British: Act IX

  1. #111
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    OliveOil_Med's Avatar
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    What are some general aspects of British schooling that American students might find weird? Come to think of it, what are some aspects of American education that you Brits find weird?

    I know that I'm being horribly vague, but I'm at a standstill in my story and I need some insperation via this thread.

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  2. #112
    garyf
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    What are some general aspects of British schooling that American students might find weird? Come to think of it, what are some aspects of American education that you Brits find weird?

    I know that I'm being horribly vague, but I'm at a standstill in my story and I need some insperation via this thread.
    First day of the new school year isn't until September/university can be any time from late September to late October depending on teaching weeks.

    Some private schools (usually called "public" or increasingly "independent" schools, ie not state-run) and the ever decreasing number of grammar schools have the 11+ exam (ages 11-16/18). Laura (Tyrannolaurus) is often amazed at how difficult they are. Only the brightest are ever put in for it, as some questions are often beyond degree level, but if you've been to an independent prep school you're groomed for them. If you pass you're in if your parentals can afford the fees (or you get a scholarship, derog. term amounting to "scrounger's benefit", "poor-family grant", and the likes), if not it's normally off to a local secondary school, where they don't charge 4-figure fees per term.

    Some schools (again, usually independent schools) have compulsory classes on a Saturday morning for 11-16 year olds, with the Saturday school day running from 8.30am-2pm (in the case of my school), similar to some of the European schools. You'll find very few state schools do this, although some do have extra-curricular classes on a Saturday morning which are optional.

  3. #113
    Hufflepuff at Heart
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    Would people say "dorm-mate" in Britain?

    I'm not really sure if they say it anywhere; this may simply be something I've made up right now...but just in case! If not, what else would they refer to people who share a dormitory at a school?

  4. #114
    Evester
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    Some quick questions:

    At what age to most teens get their driver's license in England, specifically in Marauder-Era time period (70's)?

    What is an average speed for a residential road, and for a highway (in whatever scale you use- kilometers or miles, whatever)

    Finally, can someone name a car company and model that was popular in the 70's in Muggle England?

    Thanks very much!

  5. #115
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hufflepuff at Heart
    Would people say "dorm-mate" in Britain?

    I'm not really sure if they say it anywhere; this may simply be something I've made up right now...but just in case! If not, what else would they refer to people who share a dormitory at a school?
    No, they would use Room Mate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Evester
    Some quick questions:

    At what age to most teens get their driver's license in England, specifically in Marauder-Era time period (70's)?

    What is an average speed for a residential road, and for a highway (in whatever scale you use- kilometers or miles, whatever)

    Finally, can someone name a car company and model that was popular in the 70's in Muggle England?

    Thanks very much!
    Number 1: 17

    Number 2: Depends where you are, little streets and estates is normally 20mph(miles per hour), normal roads around 30-40mph, and highways are 70mph, I think.

    Number 3: Mini Cooper, the old ones they were quite popular, Fords like the one Mr Weasely had I think were popular aswell, I just can't remember the make name

  6. #116
    Rome
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    Evester:

    At what age to most teens get their driver's license in England, specifically in Marauder-Era time period (70's)?

    The earliest age you can get a driving license is at 17; so I assume that's when they got it.

    What is an average speed for a residential road, and for a highway (in whatever scale you use- kilometers or miles, whatever)

    Most residential roads have a speed limit of 30 mph.
    On a motorway (or highway, as you Americans call them. xDD) the speed limit is 70 mph for cars and motorcycles. It's 60 mph if you are towing a trailer. Just thought I'd add that last sentence. xDD

    Finally, can someone name a car company and model that was popular in the 70's in Muggle England?

    Like Gorgeous_Ginny said, it was probably the Mini Cooper. The Austin Mini Cooper to be exact. :P

    &Mr Weasley's car was a Ford Anglia. =D

    Quote Originally Posted by OliveOil_Med
    What are some general aspects of British schooling that American students might find weird? Come to think of it, what are some aspects of American education that you Brits find weird?

    I know that I'm being horribly vague, but I'm at a standstill in my story and I need some insperation via this thread.
    Well, we have Primary School from the ages of 5-11.
    Secondary School's from the ages 11-16. (There are important exams at the end, called GCSE's.)
    We then go to college for usually 2 years. And then off to Uni! =D
    Instead of like ... 1st Grade, 2nd Grade etc ... Like in America; we have Year 1, Year 2 etc ...
    The 2 years in college are split into two, the exams in the first year are called AS Level exams. &The exams in the 2nd year are called A2 Level exams. Together, the make up an A Level.
    Uhmm ... that's all I can think of atm. I'll let you know if anything else comes to mind! =D

  7. #117
    Shev
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Rome
    Well, we have Primary School from the ages of 5-11.
    Secondary School's from the ages 11-16. (There are important exams at the end, called GCSE's.)
    We then go to college for usually 2 years. And then off to Uni! =D
    Instead of like ... 1st Grade, 2nd Grade etc ... Like in America; we have Year 1, Year 2 etc ...
    The 2 years in college are split into two, the exams in the first year are called AS Level exams. &The exams in the 2nd year are called A2 Level exams. Together, the make up an A Level.
    Uhmm ... that's all I can think of atm. I'll let you know if anything else comes to mind! =D
    Please note that while the above is true in England, Scotland has a completely different system, both in structure and naming. I can elaborate if it's needed at all.

  8. #118
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rome
    Well, we have Primary School from the ages of 5-11.
    Secondary School's from the ages 11-16. (There are important exams at the end, called GCSE's.)
    We then go to college for usually 2 years. And then off to Uni! =D
    Instead of like ... 1st Grade, 2nd Grade etc ... Like in America; we have Year 1, Year 2 etc ...
    The 2 years in college are split into two, the exams in the first year are called AS Level exams. &The exams in the 2nd year are called A2 Level exams. Together, the make up an A Level.
    Uhmm ... that's all I can think of atm. I'll let you know if anything else comes to mind! =D
    I would just like to add that you can go to Educational Nursery, which is before Primary School, but is normally connected to a school from 2-4.

    However if you parents are full time workers you can go to another Nursery from 6 weeks old until your 5, they will send you to an educational Nursery of your parents choice, and pick you up when your finished. Also in an Educational Nursery you either go on a morning from 9am I think it is until about 12pm or 12pm until 3pm. I think that's about right.

  9. #119
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
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    I need some help with British Police system

    I need to know if there is a branch of the system that would not require uniforms, such as a detective or an inspector. I also know that not every officer carries a gun, but which ones do? Do they carry "sheilds" or badges such as they do in America (in a flip out type wallet) or is there a lapel pin or any such thing that establishes them as an officer of the law?

    My reasons for these questions:

    In my new story Ron is in his 40's (so it is the year 2020) I'm not going to go all high tech a spacey, no flying cars or anything. However, Ron Works for a new division of the Auror office. DUe to some of the laws that Hermione got passed, there are more and more interactions between muggles and magical beings/creatures. Ron works with the local muggle law when it has bees suspected that magical creatures or wizards have been involved in a crim on Muggles. There are only a few in the Muggle department that know Ron is a wizard and they are squibs. The Ministry has decided that it is not in the best interst of the muggles to just wipe everyones memory and assume that it was magical so Ron goes in when his squib captain calls.

    I just want to make sure I have enough little details to make it beleivable. He does however have to have a gun but not a uiform if I can get around it.
    ~Kristy


  10. #120
    Gorgeous_Ginny
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    This link is all about the Metropolitan Police, which is basically the entire Police Force of England. LINK

    This is a link to the Ranks of Uniformed Officers. LINK2

    On this link there is sub headings about different ranks on the left hand side taskbar.

    Hope this helps more.

    Also from my knowledge only uniformed officers wearing their hats can make an arrest because of the badge on them, or a uniformed officer has to be at the scene of the arrest with the un-uniformed officer, these are mainly field agents, detectives, etc.

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