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Thread: Being British: Act IX

  1. #101
    apollo13
    Guest
    I don't use it, but that might be regional. I'd stick to cutlery.

    ~Evie

  2. #102
    Gorgeous_Ginny
    Guest
    Silverware is more used in a posh restaraunt you can always here people going get the silverware, or something along those lines, there is also a thing called Silverservice, (at least I think its that), where you are a waiter that serves food with a spoon and fork onto people's plates.

    Correct me if I'm wrong on the Silverserivce thing, because I have a funny feeling I am. Also where I'm from we normally just say knives and forks instead of cutlery.

    - Hannah

  3. #103
    Schmerg_The_Impaler
    Guest
    Let's say two people want to go get married, but they want to do it FAST without the trouble of a church wedding. Can you give me any info on how they'd do that without going to Vegas?

    I know all about how people would go to Scotland in the Pride and Prejudice era and stuff like that, but I'd like to know about how you'd go about it nowadays (and don't be cheeky and say they'd skip the trouble of getting married altogether!) I know a bit about American marriage stuff, but I know that the laws and things are a little bit different in England. What sort of place would you go to get married?

    Clarification: These two people are eloping, so no one else knows they're getting married except one or two others.

  4. #104
    apollo13
    Guest
    Gretna Green is a popular place to get married in secret. It's right at the south of Scotland, and famous for runaway weddings.

    ~Evie

  5. #105
    Gorgeous_Ginny
    Guest
    People can also go to their local town hall or civic center and in normal clothes can just exchange vows and leave in time for tea.

  6. #106
    Schmerg_The_Impaler
    Guest
    What, erm, precisely is a 'civic center'? These characters are in London because they're staying at the Leaky Cauldron, so I don't think a 'town hall' would apply.

  7. #107
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
    I See Dead People... In Mirrors

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    235
    In 1850s' London, would "all right?" be frequently used as a question tag? So far I have steered from using it, prefering much more formal manners of speech, but in a sentece like this (a young adult speking to his eleven-year-old sister) “But I will be back before dinner. If you want, we can work on Ruth’s picture tonight, all right?”, does it sound 19th century British English enough?

    >.>

    Please don't laugh. Details make a story unique. And yes, I do have two official betas.

    <.<
    The Run of the Mill

    The phenomenal banner is by MissBean

  8. #108
    apollo13
    Guest
    Just a registry office, really. Pretty much the same thing. My mum had her wedding at a registry office, and there was a lot of planning but, really, if there was a space, you could probably just go and mary on impulse.

    ~Evie

  9. #109
    Gorgeous_Ginny
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by kehribar
    In 1850s' London, would "all right?" be frequently used as a question tag? So far I have steered from using it, prefering much more formal manners of speech, but in a sentece like this (a young adult speking to his eleven-year-old sister) “But I will be back before dinner. If you want, we can work on Ruth’s picture tonight, all right?”, does it sound 19th century British English enough?

    >.>

    Please don't laugh. Details make a story unique. And yes, I do have two official betas.

    <.<
    I think, 'is that okay?' would work better,or 'is that all right?'.

    If anyone else has any suggestions, because my mind has gone blank.

    - Hannah x

  10. #110
    Inverarity
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Gorgeous_Ginny
    I think, 'is that okay?' would work better,or 'is that all right?'.
    Actually, "okay" was originally an Americanism. It started becoming popular in the U.S. in the latter half of the 19th century, so it would not have been popular in London at that time.

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