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Thread: Being British: Garden Gate, Number Eight

  1. #141
    R_Ravenclaw
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    I heard somewhere or another that in the British version, the Minister of Magic is actually called the Minister for Magic. Is that right? Thanks!

    ~Alison

  2. #142
    Savannah Hen Slytherin
    Sirius Black Entered Gryffindor Tower
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    yep, it's Minister for Magic:

    he had walked right into Cornelius Fudge, the Minister for Magic himself
    (POA p36)

    has succeeded Cornelius Fudge as Minister for Magic
    (HBP p43)

    Just a couple of examples from early and later books to show it was consistent. It's always seemed like a bit of a random change, I don't think people would care either way.

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  3. #143
    Vindictus Viridian
    Guest
    This may be too obscure even for this bunch. (Challenge!)

    I've used the online versions of parish records to look up genealogy in Britain, but I have no idea what these records would look like, or where they would be stored, circa 1900. I do have a fair idea that the information within would be chronological, which makes name-searching more than a little of a headache, and I know that they're pretty casual about christening Margaret and then marrying her off as Peg. However, hard physical details would be a big help. What do these things look like, and where could I see a picture?

  4. #144
    Fifth Year Gryffindor
    I See Dead People... In Mirrors

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    I'm writing a historical story which takes place in the 1850s Britain and one of the main characters is an artist (rather, trying to be one).

    Do you think that the word "freelance" was used back in 1850s? I know that artists had begun working freelance, however loosely, by then, but I'm not whether they referred to it as "freelance".

    Do you think it's safe to use the word without fear of anachronism? If not, I'd appreciate suggestions.

    Edit: Thank you, Horsesbella!
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  5. #145
    Horsesbella219
    Guest
    According to wikipedia:


    A freelancer, freelance worker, or freelance is a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer. The term "freelance" was first coined by Sir Walter Scott (1771–1832) in his well-known historical romance Ivanhoe to describe a "medieval mercenary warrior" (or "free-lance").
    So considering by 1850, i should imagine this book would be well and truly written (else he'd be dead), i guess it's safe to use. I googled it, and Ivanhoe was pulished in 1815, so i think you'll be safe in 1850

    edit:

    Apparently this book was written about the 12th century, so you should absoloutely be in the clear

  6. #146
    CCCC
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Vindictus Viridian
    This may be too obscure even for this bunch. (Challenge!)

    I've used the online versions of parish records to look up genealogy in Britain, but I have no idea what these records would look like, or where they would be stored, circa 1900. I do have a fair idea that the information within would be chronological, which makes name-searching more than a little of a headache, and I know that they're pretty casual about christening Margaret and then marrying her off as Peg. However, hard physical details would be a big help. What do these things look like, and where could I see a picture?
    They'd be stored in the Parish Churches.

    Example Picture

    (I don't know where the example's from but I've seen genuine British ones and they look like that).

  7. #147
    Lyratearsx
    Guest
    Hi, I have a few questions.

    Do you spell blond with an e on the end? I think I saw it in Harry Potter, but I don't remember.

    And soccer is called football, right?

    Also, I need some really gangster phrases that would be used in Britain in the 90s.

    Thanks!

  8. #148
    h_vic
    Guest
    As far as I'm aware blond/blonde is one of the very few adjectives we have with a gender distinction. Men are blond; women are blonde.

    We do call it football, never soccer.

    As for the gangster phrases, I'll leave that to someone else because I wouldn't have a clue.

    ~Hannah

  9. #149
    Lyratearsx
    Guest
    Thank you!

    I have a cousin who's British (London) and she says things like "Brap" (don't know what it means), "Murked" (I think it means to beat someone up) and "bare" (as in people) and "sickage" (again, don't know what it means). Any definitions would be appreciated!

    Would these be canon for the Harry Potter World?

    ~Lyra

  10. #150
    CakeorDeath
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Lyratearsx
    Thank you!

    I have a cousin who's British (London) and she says things like "Brap" (don't know what it means), "Murked" (I think it means to beat someone up) and "bare" (as in people) and "sickage" (again, don't know what it means). Any definitions would be appreciated!

    Would these be canon for the Harry Potter World?

    ~Lyra
    All thouse phrases are new things really, particualry "brap". It is basically good.

    "Sickage" is good as well.

    They definatly would not be cannon, particulary because they are only really used in London.

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