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Thread: Character Discussion - Ron Weasley

  1. #31
    MissyQuill
    Guest
    I have to agree with Kumy and admit that I never really liked Ron *avoids glare from aforementioned Weasley's fangirls*. I mean, yes he is loyal brave etc but I always saw Ron as a runner. Ron would face up to a situation and fight as bravely as anyone but only when he is accompanied by someone. As Kumy put it, he is a part of the bigger picture and dies not do "his own thing".

    Also, maybe this is just me but why would someone run from their friends when they are on such an important mission because he doesn't get good food? Is that the depth of his loyalty? Food?

    Growing among so many has made Ron very sensitive tot he fact that he will never be just Ron. He is Ron Weasley, a part of a family, Ron Weasley, the sidekick, Ron Weasley, the student. And even in his later years, Ron Weasley, a part of the Auror office. My theory is that since he knows he will never shine in the spotlight no matter how much he tries, his negative attitudes ar a way of attracting attention. That gets him noticed. And it works for when Ron is normal, Harry always takes him for granted and so does Hermione but when he goes into one of his moods, life gets interesting (for lack of a better word).

    Keeping what I just said in mind, what do you guys think he would see if he looked into the Mirror of Erised after DH, then?

    I think he would see his kids being proud of him. I am I'm sure Rose and Hugo love him and all but they will find their Uncle Harry much cooler then their dad. So, to be more accurate, he will see his kids being more proud of him then Harry.=Sammy

  2. #32
    padfoot_returns
    Guest
    Okay, before I even start with my discussion post, I have to have a little rant about fanon!Ron. I hate how some authors portray Ron as this idiotic dumb idiot who cannot tell the different between right and left. I remember reading a story once where the author didn’t even make Ron understand the most sarcastic of comments. I’d understand if the author didn’t make him understand something in emotion or something in that department, but sarcasm? Come on, Ron himself uses sarcasm in the books (need I find a quote?). Sure, he may not be as bright as Hermione, but he isn’t so stupid as to not know that 1 + 1 does not equal 3.

    And don’t even get me started on the movie, but I shan’t talk about that now since I feel as if I had ranted enough. But anyway, back to the discussion…

    When I actually think about Ron’s character, I find that out of the trio, people could relate to Ron the most. He is your everyday ordinary guy. Hardly anyone can relate to Harry because not many people are signalled out from all of mankind like Harry was and not many can relate to Hermione because, seriously, who here does their homework a week before it is due? But Ron? I can’t really seem to find anything about his character that makes him so special that no one can relate to him. And I may be wrong, but that is perhaps why he “blends in” so much and no one really notices his actions.

    In my opinion, perhaps Ron’s “most prized possession”, like many others before me said, would be his loyalty. To me, loyalty is one of the greatest things you want to have in a friend and Ron has just that. And even though he may have left in DH, he ended up coming back.

    Stubbornly_appeared said:

    He despises those who are disloyal. Ron hates Pettigrew and Snape with a passion; he is quick to judge Xenophilius Lovegood when he finds that he has secretly been part of the campaign against Harry and means to hand him over to Voldemort. And Malfoy, too, perhaps Ron's bitterest rival of all…
    You know, that’s extremely interesting. I’ve never noticed this before, but it fit perfectly. It just further proves that Ron’s signature trait is his loyalty. Also, I just realized that the thing that the Horcrux used against him in DH would be having him think that Hermione and Harry liked each other. Again, he leads to loyalty. He couldn’t stand the fact that maybe Hermione and Harry were disloyal to him and that is what pushed him to the edge.

    Now, onto his character…

    Lucilla_Joanna said:

    And he does know what he wants. It's right there in the Mirror of Erised. He was young then, but his goals remained the same. He is ambitious. Years and years of being held against his brothers' shadows just made him very self-conscious and hesitant. This lack of confidence sometimes comes across as cowardice, and impairs his talent
    I half agree with you and half don’t. I agree that years of being overshadow may have lead to his extremely low self-esteem and confidence, but I do not agree on the fact that he is ambitious. He just does not strike me as the ambitious type. Sure, he may have had the same goal throughout the years, but I don’t think he tried hard enough to chase his goals. I think his lack of confidence always get in the way and as seen in HBP, when he thought that Harry gave him some Felix potion, he played wonderfully because he had confidence, when in fact, Harry didn’t give him anything at all. Ron is an amazing character and he could do so many great things if he only realized his value

    Who’s more important: Ron or Hermione? I’ve come across this question so many times and I refuse to answer simply because I have no answer. For me, I don’t think that Harry would have been able to complete his journey without either one of them. And I totally disagree with someone people who say that Hermione is more important than Ron. Everyone needs a friend in life and I see that Ron is more of a friend to Harry than Hermione. I’m not saying Hermione isn’t a friend to Harry, but I think Ron is more of a friend and I don’t think Harry would be able to go on without him. Take what happened in DH for example. When Ron left, everything just became so depressed. Even I became depressed while reading how Harry and Hermione were feeling.

    Overall, I just don’t think Ron gets enough credit for what he does in the books.

    xxRiham

  3. #33
    apollo13
    Guest
    Ron would face up to a situation and fight as bravely as anyone but only when he is accompanied by someone. As Kumy put it, he is a part of the bigger picture and dies not do "his own thing".
    That is a fair point, but I think it is true for nearly everyone in the planet. Very few people are as brave as Harry, or Neville, I mean, no one else ran forward to try and fight Voldemort when they thought Voldemort was dead, and neither did Ron, but Ron did shout at him, and was the first to shout at him.

    There are very few people in the world who would be extremely brave on their own and even Harry was never truly alone when he did anything. I do not think that this makes Ron and less brave or a "runner", I just think that because he was brought up in a very secure, strong and loving family, he was completely thrown in at the deep end in DH.

    Who’s more important: Ron or Hermione? I’ve come across this question so many times and I refuse to answer simply because I have no answer. For me, I don’t think that Harry would have been able to complete his journey without either one of them. And I totally disagree with someone people who say that Hermione is more important than Ron. Everyone needs a friend in life and I see that Ron is more of a friend to Harry than Hermione. I’m not saying Hermione isn’t a friend to Harry, but I think Ron is more of a friend and I don’t think Harry would be able to go on without him. Take what happened in DH for example. When Ron left, everything just became so depressed. Even I became depressed while reading how Harry and Hermione were feeling.
    Absolutely. Ron and Hermione are two very different people, and that means that when one of them goes, Harry is left feeling very much like he's missing something. They both have different qualities and drawbacks, like any group of friends.

    ~Evie

  4. #34
    Miss K
    Guest
    Ooh. Before I respond to anything, I must do this first.

    Quote Originally Posted by padfoot_returns
    It just further proves that Ron’s signature trait is his loyalty.
    Now, isn't this interesting? Let's take a look at where loyalty lies among the Houses...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sorting Hat song in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
    You might belong in Gryffindor,
    Where dwell the brave at heart,
    Their daring, nerve, and chivalry
    Set Gryffindors apart;
    You might belong in Hufflepuff,
    Where they are just and loyal,
    Those patient Hufflepuffs are true
    And unafraid of toil;
    I agree that we seem to associate loyalty with Ron more often than bravery and nerve. He is brave -- he's done a lot of amazing stuff. But when we think Ron, the idea that comes to mind isn't "bravest of them all," it's "loyal friend."

    Do you think the Sorting Hat made a mistake or that we (as in the fandom at large) have the wrong impression of Ron as a character?


    ---

    And now, back to the scheduled discussion.

    Evie, I totally agree with your idea that very, very few people are brave enough to stand out in the ways that Harry does. To stand alone, against high odds -- you just don't find that in people often! I do think Ron is a brave person.

    Dear, dear, Sammy...I'm afraid you misinterpreted my impression of Ron. I don't see Ron as a runner; I see him as someone steadfast. While, yes, he doesn't do his own thing, it's not because he's a runner. He follows loyally in others' footsteps, supports THEM instead of trying to get himself ahead, and that's why he never gets a true spotlight in the books. That's what I meant.

    My theory is that since he knows he will never shine in the spotlight no matter how much he tries, his negative attitudes ar a way of attracting attention. That gets him noticed. And it works for when Ron is normal, Harry always takes him for granted and so does Hermione but when he goes into one of his moods, life gets interesting (for lack of a better word).
    I have to totally disagree with you on this. Ron is not incredibly moody, no more so than Harry, most definitely. He's just a teenager dealing with every-day insecurities and he overall has a bit of a short temper (traditional for the Weasleys! ).

    I don't think he *knows* he will never get more attention. If he knew that, he would be resigned to it, wouldn't hope for it anymore. I also don't think negative mood swings offer him a payback emotionally. Maybe he gets a bit more attention, but his friends aren't by his side, and for loyal Ron, I think that's the most important thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by padfoot_returns
    But Ron? I can’t really seem to find anything about his character that makes him so special that no one can relate to him. And I may be wrong, but that is perhaps why he “blends in” so much and no one really notices his actions.
    I never thought about his purpose in the books this way, but you have a really good point. *applause* Actually, I don't relate to him at all -- but I'm not normal, and I think most people do.

    ...and I think that's all I have to respond to. Yay for keeping the discussion alive!

  5. #35
    MissyQuill
    Guest
    I don't think he *knows* he will never get more attention. If he knew that, he would be resigned to it, wouldn't hope for it anymore.
    Well, doen't he? He himself admits that he is "rubbish" at things and that is always the last one in everything. Charlie's wand, Percy's rat, etc.

    That is why he knows that he will not stand out (unless some miracle happens) because beeing around his brothers, a talentad sister, the Chosen One and Hermione is just not going to allow him to do so.

    As far as the runner part goes. I saw it this way; Though Ron does not get moody often (good point there), he does and when he does, he tends to think irrationally. And in this case, he ran away. In his defence, he came back and wanted to come back the moment he left but he went all the same. What is to say that he won't do it again. And to his wife and kids this time round.

    The trio was under extreme strain at that time and the Horcrux locket didn't make it better but Hermione didn't run away. I see this as one of (if not the biggest) Ron's major flows.

  6. #36
    apollo13
    Guest
    As far as the runner part goes. I saw it this way; Though Ron does not get moody often (good point there), he does and when he does, he tends to think irrationally. And in this case, he ran away. In his defence, he came back and wanted to come back the moment he left but he went all the same. What is to say that he won't do it again. And to his wife and kids this time round.

    The trio was under extreme strain at that time and the Horcrux locket didn't make it better but Hermione didn't run away. I see this as one of (if not the biggest) Ron's major flows.
    No, Hermione didn't run away, that is a fair point, but I think Ron ran away because, like Ginny, he has got a weaker mind when it comes to internally fighting Voldemort. I think Hermione is very strong minded - those that are opinionated nearly always are - but I think that Ron and Ginny, while they are both clever and fiesty and determind in their own right, could not fight against Voldemort as easily, because they have insecurities far deeper than Hermione.

    For instance, the only insecurity that Hermione has ever really shown is the fact that she is a "mudblood", and by DH, she says that she's proud of it. You could also say that the whole Ron/Lavender thing was an insecurity of sorts, but then you could also say that was countered for Ron with the whole Hermione/Krum saga.

    Now Ron and Ginny, on the other hand, have a fair few insecurities between them. Their family is poor, something which Ron and Percy have always been ashamed of, Ron feels over shadowed by his brothers and Ginny feels somthered by them, Ron feels that he is bad a Quidditch and yet is expected to be good at it, Ron feels distinctly unloved and ignored by the rest of his family, he feels threatened by Harry and Krum and, possibly the biggest factor of all, he doesn't think he's doing anything to help the war.

    The arguement in DH started off because Harry and Hermione were ignoring Ron somewhat. I think Ron looked upon the trio as Hermione being the brains, Harry being the brawn, and him? Well, we have already established that Ron is the "glue which holds them together" (cliche, but true), but I don't think anyone could ever actually look at themselves and truthfully say that they thought they are the glue which holds their friendship group together. Ron probably saw himself as a spare part of sorts, and wanted to do more to help the war, but felt that Harry and Hermione were over shadowing him, just as his brothers had always done.

    ~Evie

  7. #37
    Miss K
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Missy Quill
    Well, doen't he? He himself admits that he is "rubbish" at things and that is always the last one in everything. Charlie's wand, Percy's rat, etc.

    That is why he knows that he will not stand out (unless some miracle happens) because beeing around his brothers, a talentad sister, the Chosen One and Hermione is just not going to allow him to do so.
    Again, I must disagree. He says that, but I don't think he believes it. He says it as a protective mechanism -- maybe if he says it often enough, discounts the hope, he won't be hurt so badly if he doesn't get the attention; that's his thought, I think.

    I don't think Ron has given up hope for gaining more attention. He tries so hard as Keeper of the Gryffindor Quidditch team because he is trying to get more attention. When he does well, that's a confirmation of the idea that, yes, he can stand alone and gain attention.

    I think Ron becomes a more and more confident character within the bubble of Hogwarts, and there, we see him getting attention in his own right as the books go on. In DH, when they're out in the "real world," per se, full of fear and tension, he loses his bearings on that confidence, that's true...but it comes back to him and is solidified when he destroys that Horcrux. Which is, again, why I think he'd see something different in the Mirror of Erised post-DH than he did back in the first book.

    Quote Originally Posted by Missy Quill
    As far as the runner part goes. I saw it this way; Though Ron does not get moody often (good point there), he does and when he does, he tends to think irrationally. And in this case, he ran away. In his defence, he came back and wanted to come back the moment he left but he went all the same. What is to say that he won't do it again. And to his wife and kids this time round.

    The trio was under extreme strain at that time and the Horcrux locket didn't make it better but Hermione didn't run away. I see this as one of (if not the biggest) Ron's major flows.
    Yesterday 16:32
    Ron does think irrationally when he is angry. I think a lot of us do! But the thing is, when you grow up, you learn to control that kind of stuff. You become mature adults. People crack in life-and-death situation; it happens in real-life situations all the time.

    I don't think Ron will run away again. For one thing, he'll probably never again face a situation that traumatic and worrying. The coming of the Dark Lord was like the end of the world -- the Apocalypse. There is going to be nothing that strenuous to break him in the future.

    Also, he's gotten stronger as a character. As you said, Sammy, he came back. I think that shows us he's developed the strength needed to stick around in the future. It was one of his flaws, but some of our flaws fade as we grow as people -- I think this one of Ron's has.

    Quote Originally Posted by apollo13
    think Ron ran away because, like Ginny, he has got a weaker mind when it comes to internally fighting Voldemort. I think Hermione is very strong minded - those that are opinionated nearly always are - but I think that Ron and Ginny, while they are both clever and fiesty and determind in their own right, could not fight against Voldemort as easily, because they have insecurities far deeper than Hermione.
    That's definitely a valid point at that time in DH. I think, now, though, that Ron has grown enough that he's learned to control those insecurities and even that some of them have gone away. When writing fanfiction post-DH, I don't think Ron's insecurities should be considered in the writing as big of a character flaw as they were in pre-DH stories.

    ---

    So...have we missed my Sorting Hat question above? I'm interested in what you lot have to say about it. Let me reiterate:

    Quote Originally Posted by Miss K
    Ooh. Before I respond to anything, I must do this first.

    Quote Originally Posted by padfoot_returns
    It just further proves that Ron’s signature trait is his loyalty.
    Now, isn't this interesting? Let's take a look at where loyalty lies among the Houses...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sorting Hat song in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
    You might belong in Gryffindor,
    Where dwell the brave at heart,
    Their daring, nerve, and chivalry
    Set Gryffindors apart;
    You might belong in Hufflepuff,
    Where they are just and loyal,
    Those patient Hufflepuffs are true
    And unafraid of toil;
    I agree that we seem to associate loyalty with Ron more often than bravery and nerve. He is brave -- he's done a lot of amazing stuff. But when we think Ron, the idea that comes to mind isn't "bravest of them all," it's "loyal friend."
    Do you think the Sorting Hat made a mistake or that we (as in the fandom at large) have the wrong impression of Ron as a character?

  8. #38
    padfoot_returns
    Guest
    Do you think the Sorting Hat made a mistake or that we (as in the fandom at large) have the wrong impression of Ron as a character?

    Miss K, that is a very good question to bring up. My answer would be no, the Sorting Hat didn’t make a mistake. From with what happened with Harry, we know that the Sorting Hat places you in the house you choose to be in. Perhaps Ron was meant to go into Hufflepuff, but he just chose Gryffindor. We must keep in mind that all of his previous brothers went into Gryffindor and his goal was to be just like them.

    xxRiham

  9. #39
    apollo13
    Guest
    No, I don't think the hat made a mistake. Ron maybe very loyal, eg, a Hufflepuff, but Hermione is very brainy, eg, a Ravenclaw.

    Yes, as padfoot_returns says, it may well have been because Ron "chose" Gryffindor, but I think it's more likely to be that Ron is more brave than he is loyal, although his loyalty gets shown more, and his bravery is often forgotten because we're focused on Harry.

    I mean, look at CoS. Ron stayed behind that collapsed wall with Lockheart. He didn't know whether Harry and Ginny would come back, and he could have quite easily tried to go back up to the school - it sounds like a really creepy and eerie place, especially when you don't know what's about to happen.

    To stay there with Lockheart, despite how scared and worried he must of been, that's very brave, but is forgotten because Harry appears to be braver.

    ~Evie

  10. #40
    Zara Ravenwood
    Guest
    Firstly, Ron and Harry had some rocky patches in their friendship - can anyone here honestly say that they have never had a large argument with a friend?

    Some of this may have been said by now but here gose.

    The chapter where Ron and Harry have their worst spat broke my heart. As I had had just lost my best friend of fifteen years that year due to a fight. Like Ron and Harry the fight was based on ongoing issues and was a long time coming. Unlike them we have not reconciled. “Something had broken between them.” JK wrote. I was listening to the book on CD (because we were traveling across the state the day after it came out) and I was crying so hard, I need to stop for a few minutes. Harry was hurt hard by Ron but Ron in a way was hurt just as deeply. Any relationship you’ve put effort in is torture when you end it. I can only image what it musty feel like to walk out on a friendship in which you once not only trust one another with your lives, but in which you both made good on that trust. There is pain, and there is wishing pain on the other person, if only to know they once cared enough about you to elicit such pain; a desperate need to know that friendship had ever been real at all.

    Yet Ron comes back. The seen where the two come back again may show more bravery then anywhere else in the book. Ron risks not only exposing his self by admitting his was wrong, but he risks something dearer – rejection. For all he knows, Harry might reject him, and in doing so invalidate all that passed between them in better times.

    As for Harry I’m not sure I could be as big a person as he was in taking him back. I have done it before only to be hurt again. Harry however has one thing going for him, his friends are all he has. He has only his hurt to lose (to a degree) by taking Ron back, and everything to gain.

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