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Thread: Character Discussion - Ron Weasley

  1. #61
    The Canon Queen Hufflepuff
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    I love writing Ron. He is such a complex character to write. Granted, he does not have Hermione's booksmarts, but he has his own intelligence. He is also very loyal. I know you are saying, but he left them in DH. Yes, he did, and he also states he immediately wanted to come back. Ron has a temper like his mum's. He blows up but regrets it when he calms down which doesn't take too long.

    I also see Ron as a very strong character. As stated above, he is the glue that holds the trio together. His is logical and though he doesn't use books like Hermione to figure things out, he can figure out things on his own.

    I hate when I read him portrayed as a dumb sidekick, only there for comic relief. There is so much more to Ron. He grew up with a lot to live up to. The locket stated his deepest feelings, ones I am not even sure he knew he had.

    Youngest son to parents who longed for a daughter, is this true? I am sure in Ron's deepest heart, he thinks this.

    Bill, a cursebreaker, prefect, with 12 O.W.L.s; Charlie, dragontamer, Quidditch captain; Percy, working at the Ministry, prefect with 12 O.W.L.s; Fred and George, who had the brains to invent so many things and the nerve to start their own successful business; Ginny, the baby, the only girl in generations.

    Is it any wonder Ron feels like he isn't good enough? But, he is. He is also made a prefect. He ends up saving the game and helping the team to win the Quidditch Cup. He works out the chess game, and makes the plan for the Ministry. He saves Harry's life and gets the sword. He destroys the locket and comes up with a way to destroy the cup. He manages to get himself and Hermione into the Chamber of Secrets only having heard Harry say open in Parseltongue once.

    Yes, there is more to Ronald Weasley than meets the eye. He deserves so much more credit than most writers give him.

    Okay, going to get off my soapbox now. LOL
    Terri Black (as in Mrs Sirius {aka Padfoot} Black)
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  2. #62
    First Year Gryffindor
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    Ron is my favorite character. To me, Ron is the average Joe in the series. He’s not the superbrain like Hermione or the front-page hero like Harry. Ron is the character who, I think, acts and reacts like most of us would most of the time.

    Sometimes, Ron’s temper gets the best of him, he reacts, and then he regrets it, just like the rest of us. He turns to Lavender because he’s upset with Ginny and Hermione, and then he’s stuck with her. He angrily walks out on Hermione and Harry and immediately wants to return, but he is unable. That must have been hard to live with for the rest of his life. For most of us, the older we are, the more regrets we have.

    He doesn’t stick up for himself when Lucius Malfoy is offensive, but he constantly sticks up for his family and friends. For example, they have to hold him back from attacking when Malfoy insults his mother, he tries to curse Malfoy when he calls Hemione a Moodblood, and he faces Seamus plus a roomful of skeptical Gryffs to defend Harry. He even shouts at Voldemort! I am the same way - you can say what you want about me, but I don’t care who you are, don’t attack my family or friends. I think most other people react that way, too.

    Like everyone else, Ron is afraid of things. He is afraid of things like three-headed dogs, mediocrity, and of losing people he loves. When Ron is terrified and reluctant to go into the nest of acromantulas, I’m sharing those feelings. But, he goes any way because he cares about his friends, just like any of us would. And that’s what makes Ron’s quiet heroism seem ordinary. He’s scared, but he does it anyway – just like us.

    ~Tia

  3. #63
    MarieEvans760
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    Tia I think you hit the nail on the head. Thats why we love Ron, he is sweet, and dense sometimes. He gets things wrong, and says the wrong things. He doesn't know how to act around girls, and wants nothing more than to be the center of attention once in a while. He is the person who has faults, he's easy to relate to.

    If you were in a fight you would want him to be your back up, and you know you can cry on his shoulder.

    He's just an all around amazing character who over the years has become so important to us all!

    Marie

  4. #64
    Mudblood_and_Proud_of_it
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    I do agree that there is a lot more to Ron than meets the eye. Some who write him simply scratch the surface, but you rarely really see Ron with his fears and hopes laid down on the table. mudbloodproud really had an accurate analyzation, same with TiaBlue. I think deep down he's really insecure, just like the rest of us. But he is undoubtedly a Gryff, and I don't know about anyone else, but when he shouted at Voldemort, I was pumping my fist in the air screaming "Go Ron!!"

    Mapoi
    PS mudbloodproud, when you were describing Ginny, you said she was "the baby, the only girl in generations," but I do think there's a lot more to her than that.

  5. #65
    The Canon Queen Hufflepuff
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    Originally posted by Tia:
    He doesn’t stick up for himself when Lucius Malfoy is offensive, but he constantly sticks up for his family and friends. For example, they have to hold him back from attacking when Malfoy insults his mother, he tries to curse Malfoy when he calls Hemione a Moodblood, and he faces Seamus plus a roomful of skeptical Gryffs to defend Harry. He even shouts at Voldemort!
    Exactly. Ron would go to the ends of the earth for his family and friends, but doesn't understand or believes he deserves it when his family and friends are willing to do the same for him.

    I think he was truly surprised and did not understand Angelina when she refused to let him resign from the Quidditch team during fifth year. He never expected to have someone believe in him when he didn't believe in himself. Someone other than Harry, Hermione or his family.

    Originally posted by Mapoi:
    mudbloodproud, when you were describing Ginny, you said she was "the baby, the only girl in generations," but I do think there's a lot more to her than that.
    I know there is. I won't even get started in this thread on Ginny. I was just generalizing and using a quick description Ron would have thought and seen about her to show some of the things he felt he had to live up to. I am sure these things about his siblings added to his lack of self-confidence.
    Terri Black (as in Mrs Sirius {aka Padfoot} Black)
    Hufflepuff Head of House


  6. #66
    ZomgShaylex
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    Honestly, Ron isn't one of my favorites. I've never been able to explain why, but he gets on my nerves. Even so, I can still see a good character in him. He's loyal, funny, optimistic, and just an all-around good person with some flaws here and there. One of the flaws most often named is a lack of self-confidence.

    However, I have to disagree with the belief that Ron lacks self-confidence. As stated by me and countless others, Ron is a very loyal person, and I think that loyalty and confidence go hand-in-hand.

    Following the events of 4th year, many people put Harry down and accuse him of lying, but Ron sticks by him the whole time. It takes a lot of confidence to stand by Harry through all that, but he goes one step further: he stands up to some of his other friends. Seamus didn't believe Harry about Voldy's return, mostly because his mother believed the Daily Prophet, but Ron stands up to him and tells him he's wrong.

    If Ron lacked confidence, he wouldn't have had the courage to stand up for his friends so many times in the past. He would have been too worried about what others would think rather than his friends' feelings. I don't think people give him enough credit when it comes to security and confidence in himself. Yes, he has his moments of weakness, but doesn't everyone feel a little insecure at times. That's one of the things that helps make him the "ordinary hero" that everyone loves.

  7. #67
    Fifth Year Ravenclaw
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    Hmm... I'm a bit inclined to disagree with you here. [Though I concur that Ron isn't and has never been my favourite character - it's not that I find things 'wrong' with him, necessarily, but I just personally dislike him as a character/person.]

    Quote Originally Posted by ZomgShaylex
    However, I have to disagree with the belief that Ron lacks self-confidence. As stated by me and countless others, Ron is a very loyal person, and I think that loyalty and confidence go hand-in-hand.
    The major distinction that needs to be made here is confidence versus self-confidence. Was Ron a confident character? I think about 98% of us will agree that yes, he is, because that's how he chooses to portray himself. Throughout all seven books, he wants to be seen as the hero, and therefore, that's who he's often perceived as.

    Now, mentally, however, I strongly believe that Ron lacks confidence. Is he loyal to Harry? Yes. Will he publicly stand up for what he believes? Yes, he will. Does he honestly believe he's good enough? Now, here's the thing - I don't think he does. With the locket in DH, we're shown Ron's greatest fear, and that's being left behind, being second-best to Harry. Now, this is only what Ron feels... and sure, only once in all seven books did this take complete jurisdiction over his loyalty to Harry, when he left in DH. It could be argued that therefore, overall Ron does have a lot of confidence. But Ron's one of the characters in HP who honestly creates a public persona for himself based on who he wants to be. I think that Ron is a strong person in that respect [again, only once did this persona fail to a detrimental extent... but then, he's often seen complaining to Harry about his lack of money/new stuff, which I think is insecurity more than him whining for the sake of it].

    Anyway, I think the reason that Ron stands up for Harry and the Anti-Voldemort movement is because he's shouting to the world, "see? I can do it. I can be this person." But he's so used to being compared to his brothers, to getting everything second-hand, that it really comes down to the fact that he's always going to have that bit of insecurity about him. He's always going to lack that bit of self-confidence, which, sure, won't make him stop standing up for Harry, but it will make him hesitate in wondering whether he's worthy of something or other.

    Interesting point, and I can definitely see where you're coming from... but I think that 'loyalty' and 'self-confidence' don't necessarily go hand-in-hand. Just because Ron's self-confidence never prevented him for standing up for Harry, doesn't mean that it wasn't always there, hurting him in other ways.






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  8. #68
    kilroy8031
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    I think that in many ways Ron is the one that holds "The Golden Trio" together when the times are the toughest. Hermoine and Harry are both very strong personalities, and can at times lack people skills. For example Harry tends to go off on his own, shut others out, and take on huge amounts of responsibility alone. Hermoine can become so involved in the intellectual world that she forgets she has to compromise with a less than perfect society (ie the ferocity with which she promoted SPEW).

    Ron does an excellent job of mediating between them. I could also picture Ron doing the same thing with his brothers. He is somewhere between his two rugged older brothers, overachieving Percy, and the audacious, rule breaking twins.

    Ron also provides insight to Harry and Hermoine (both of whom grew up in the Muggle world) into wizarding customs and culture. Its no wonder that Ron was the one who tried to curse Malfoy for calling Hermoine a mudblood, he's the only one who knew how offensive the term was.

    It is through Ron that readers learn of the animosity towards the Malfoys held by many wizards. It is through Ron that readers learn of the struggles of average wizarding families.

    In a world dominated by extremes, Ron provides a sense of normalcy that is reassuring. His problems aren't that he has an evil megalomaniac bearing down on him, his problem isn't that he is a super genius who just can't learn enough. His problems are more along the lines that he wants to recognized and cared for as an individual. Which is something that even muggle readers of Harry Potter can relate to.

    Relatabilty is what I believe Ron brings to the Harry Potter universe.

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