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Thread: British and American Spelling Differences

  1. #11
    apollo13
    Guest
    Heh, yeah sorry about that principal thing - I was trying to watch tv at the same time as doing this, and my mind wasn't really on the job. >.<

    ~Evie

  2. #12
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    One thing that really seems to confuse many Americans -

    British does not mean English. An Englishman can be British but a Brit is not necessarily from England.

    British includes all of Welsh, English, Scottish, and Northern Irish peoples.

    British accents are a myth. There is no such thing as a British accent, but there are many English, Scottish, Welsh, and N Irish accents.

  3. #13
    Horsesbella219
    Guest
    One thing that really seems to confuse many Americans -

    British does not mean English. An Englishman can be British but a Brit is not necessarily from England.

    British includes all of Welsh, English, Scottish, and Northern Irish peoples.

    British accents are a myth. There is no such thing as a British accent, but there are many English, Scottish, Welsh, and N Irish accents.
    If anyone has any trouble remembering that, i'd like to suggest a marvellous rthyme we used to sing in school when we were doing french skipping:

    Endland, ireland, Scotland, Wales
    Inside, outside, Inside, On.
    It's also good for remembering how to do french skipping

  4. #14
    emmaholloway
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by bluexroses
    battery -- cell
    cell? Isn't it a cell when it is only half a battery (or something like that, like when you had to draw the circuit diagrams in physics and a cell only had one big line and one small line, where as a battery had two?)

    Battery is always battery as far as I know.

  5. #15
    bluexroses
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by emmaholloway
    cell? Isn't it a cell when it is only half a battery (or something like that, like when you had to draw the circuit diagrams in physics and a cell only had one big line and one small line, where as a battery had two?)

    Battery is always battery as far as I know.
    Hm, you're probably right. I just remember when I went to England and needed one, the lady we were staying with called it a cell. *shrug* I probably just got something mixed up.

  6. #16
    apollo13
    Guest
    I have actually only ever heard Americans refer to batteries as cells.

    ~Evie

  7. #17
    Rhi for HP
    Guest
    Hmm...no, Evie, I have never ever heard a battery called a cell here in America, and I have been to 45 states...we just call them batteries...so I guess both Brits and Americans call them that.

    cozy - cosy
    fulfill - fulfil
    any word ending in "ize" - "--ise" (Note: Microsoft Word, if you set the automatic spellcheck on U.K. English rather than U.S. English (many people do so and think that counts as Britpicking) will not pick up this difference, so you have to do it manually.)
    Spoiled, spilled, spelled -- spoilt, spilt, spelt (sorry, I don't know the rule on this, like which verbs change and which don't, because not all verbs end in 't' in the past tense in British English).
    whine - whinge
    judgment - judgement
    okay - OK
    elementary school - primary school
    middle school/junior high and high school (I've heard both called the British version) - secondary school

  8. #18
    Lola-Louisa
    Guest
    In America, there seem to be two different spellings for the word "grey". There is the one I just put and "gray".

    Is there any difference?

    And also, my American cousin keeps referring to braids, like as in hair. I've only ever heard them in rope terms. What are they?

    (This actually does have something to do with my fanfic)

  9. #19
    Rushia
    Guest
    The way it was explained to me is that "grey" is British and "gray" is American. And sure enough, the first one is considered misspelled by my browser's automatic spell check. Interesting.

    I don't really know a way to explain braids without using the word "braid," so here's a picture:



    Just curious, what do you call those instead?

    ~ Lucia

  10. #20
    saizine
    Guest
    Rushia, braids are often referred to as 'plaits'. The specific picture that you posted would be a French plait, I believe. Or at least, that was what my family referred to them as! I've not lived in England for a while, so I don't know if it's gone out of "use" or not.

    xoxo Lessie

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