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Thread: Being British Number Seven

  1. #81
    apollo13
    Guest
    In what kind of area are you looking at? Rural? Inner city? Outer city? Upper class or lower class?

  2. #82
    **plotbunnies**
    Guest
    Rural, small country village type, if you know. I was thinking thatch, but I don't really know...

    -Anne

    EDIT: Fairly poor, like, not extra money but enough to get by with, I'm thinking a dusty road with maybe a few chickens, wooden apple cart with not very high quatlity apples, etc.

  3. #83
    apollo13
    Guest
    Yeah, what you've got sounds about right. It probably would be thatched, and it would be a dusty white or pink plaster on the outside, with the wooden beams of the house showing through. Try typing traditional English rural cottage into google images, and see what you come up with.

    ~Evie

  4. #84
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    Well, it was all sort of green back then. Where exactly are you planning on setting it? Odds are if you were poor you'd probably have been a serf or peasant in someone's fiefdom, so you'd have maybe a small cottage with an earthen floor and thatched roof, and everyone would most likely sleep in the same room (it would like have only one or two rooms, depending on how well off the family were, and how they had managed to build their house). There would be a fire for cooking, pallets for sleeping, a cooking pot, and if you wanted, yes, an apple cart. Though, if they were in a fiefdom and served a lord the apples would go to him before anyone else, and then money they made selling apples would probably largely go to him as well. Someone in the family might work in his house, or in his fields. Actually, they probably all would work in his fields or with the animals, unless they were free and simply lived in the little town at the foot of the manor, in which case the father might be a baker, or a butcher, or something.

    In a rural area, they'd still have a thatched cottage, small patch of land for farming, apple cart if you like, all of whichi would go directly to whoever sold and ate the apples, rather than a lord, maybe a few chickens and a cow if they had it well enough. Pony? If they did rather well as peasants, they could have a pony to pull the apple cart.

  5. #85
    **plotbunnies**
    Guest
    Thanks to you both! What you've described fits my story, so there's no trouble there.

    Also, thanks for replying so quickly!

    Everyone Else: I do not need others to say anything about this. Chances are I will not see your suggestions, so sorry.

    -Anne *is hurrying off to write fic*

  6. #86
    Love_is_4ever
    Guest
    Would you call an Emergency Room at a hospital an "ER"?

    It may seem random, but I want to make sure...

    ~ Samarie

  7. #87
    apollo13
    Guest
    It would be more commonly be called casualty. Eg, "Harry's been rushed into casualty." Meaning, that Harry has been rushed into the Emergency room. Doctors and Nurses would call it the Emergency room, though.

    ~Evie

  8. #88
    rita_skeeter
    Guest
    Another word for Casualty would be ED - Emergency Department. This is generally what the staff would call it, rather than ER, which is the Americanised form.

  9. #89
    PadfootnPeeves
    Guest
    Alright, alright... I feel terrible asking, since obviously everyone but me knows. But *deep breath*... what's cricket?

  10. #90
    apollo13
    Guest
    It's a sport, commonly played among the upper middle and upper class of England. Forgive me, I do not know about the exact rules, but the bowler throws the ball (In a very special way) at three sticks, called the wicket. A batter stands in front of the wicket with a long, thick, flat bat, held quite low. If the bowler hits the wicket, then the batter is out, but the point is for the batter to hit the ball away and run to, I believe, where the bowler stands and back, earning one point, or a run, as its called. There are fielders who aim to catch the ball and throw it back to the bowler, who will try and hit the wicket again.

    I apologise to any cricket fans who are furious at this poor explanation, but it's been years since I played it (at primary school) and I believe my brain may have mixed it with kwick cricket.



    ~Evie

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