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Thread: Being British Number Seven

  1. #41
    Shev
    Guest
    What is now called football in the UK originated as Association Soccer - so actually in this case the Americanism is more historically correct than the currently used British term. It's been known as football here for a long time now though.

    On the school subject mentioned earlier, I could go into details about the Scottish system if needed, just let me know.

  2. #42
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    In most cases, or many at least, the American verision is the historically correct one, and because England and America became so separated, America went on with it and England slowly morphed, and the two of them grew apart.

  3. #43
    kathyhermy123
    Guest
    Well, in Ireland, at least, we have 'Football', otherwise known as 'Soccer, and 'American Football', which is seen as a confusing game involving lots of lines, big padded shirts, helmets and rugby balls. Then we have rugby and 'Gaelic Football', our own spin on the football market.

    ~Kathy

  4. #44
    Weasley24
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by ElizabethR.Austin
    I am currently working with a character that is of Scottish origin. I already did the research for her last name, but what I am not sure on is any social differences I should be aware of. Are there any certian words in dialect or certian behaviors that should be evident in such a character?
    I'm from Scotland so I could help you. Just pm me if you want .

    -Sarah

  5. #45
    ElizabethR.Austin
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Weasley24
    I'm from Scotland so I could help you. Just pm me if you want .

    -Sarah
    Awesome. I really appreciate it. I've done some wikipedia lookups, but you can't really trust all the information on there, and websearching just is not in the stars for me.

    -Carolyn

  6. #46
    CCCC
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by SiriuslyMental
    In most cases, or many at least, the American verision is the historically correct one, and because England and America became so separated, America went on with it and England slowly morphed, and the two of them grew apart.
    Most of the ones where the change is systematic (use of u for example) was due to Webster deciding he didn't like it the other way.

    And it'd be in general more accurate to say that the British and American versions evolved on separate paths rather than one staying the same and the other changing.

  7. #47
    squirrly donut
    Guest
    Is there another word for pancakes? Or do you have something similar to them?

  8. #48
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    Pancakes is what we've always called them. Or crÍpes, when we wanted to feel French.
    Never "flapjacks" or whatever they're called.

  9. #49
    emmaholloway
    Guest
    I have a feeling that American pancakes are different to english pancakes though.

    American ones, correct me if I am wrong, are quite thick? We have small versions of these called scotch pancakes, or drop scones. These are sometimes had with bacon and maple syrup. yum yum.

    But if you say pancakes in england they are more like crepes. They are thin and big and you have them either savoury or sweet. Lemon and Sugar being the traditional thing though. You often role them up and then eat them so that all the filling roles of the end so that you have to lick your plate afterwards. It is all very fun.

    How I do love to spread my pancake knowledge.

  10. #50
    Heather25x
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by jediprankster
    First, I am aware that us Americans have taken rugby, wussified it, and named it football. As a result, football got renamed soccer. My question is, do any brits say soccer, or is it always called football? I only ask this because my (American) copies of Harry Potter all say soccer. There are references to Dean Thomas hanging posters of the West Ham soccer club on the walls of the dormitory, and Ron poking them with his finger in an attempt to make the players move. I know that some things, like the title to the first book, were changed for the American market, but there are many distinctly British words and phrases which remain intact in the American editions. The soccer thing always bugged me because I knew these were British books, and this was the only thing I noticed that had been made American.

    Bottom line: Is it always football, or has American influence resulted in soccer being used sometimes?
    Brits always, always always always, call it football.

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