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Thread: Being British Number Seven

  1. #91
    Third Year Slytherin
    Bumper Cars in Gringotts
    Neville's Girl's Avatar
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    Are there any specific housing codes in England? I know there are some in France like "There must be two doors separating the kitchen from the bathroom."

    Also (I know it sounds stupid) do a lot of people live in Bristol? How far long a drive is it to London from Bristol? (If you take the motorway.)

    You don't need to answer that last question. I'm just looking for general estimates though.

    Smiles,
    Luna

  2. #92
    TyrannoLaurus
    Guest
    I don't know about the first question, but it takes exactly 2 hours 19 minutes to get to Bristol from London, apparently. According to theaa.com (go to Route Planner and you can find any route around England, plus you can tick to avoid motoways or take certain motoways.) To get to Bristol from London, you use the M4, and then the M32. It is 105 miles west of London.

    It is a large city with a cathedral and a very well-known and high ranking University. It has a population of around 500,000 people and is England's sixth most populous city. I haven't been to Bristol but I do have a friend who lives there, so if you have any specific questions I'd be happy to pass them on.

  3. #93
    First Year Ravenclaw
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    Sonorus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PadfootnPeeves
    Alright, alright... I feel terrible asking, since obviously everyone but me knows. But *deep breath*... what's cricket?
    How much detail do you want with this answer? This might be too much. Cricket (the best game in the world IMHO) is a sport played between two teams of eleven which can last anything from about 3 hours to 5 days, depending on the format used. It has some (but not many) similarities to baseball and probably occupies the same position in English culture as baseball does in the US.

    Each team has either one or two innings (again depending on the format) to score as many runs as possible. At any one time there are always two players of the batting side and all eleven of the fielding side on the field. In the middle of the field is a 22-yard long strip called the 'pitch', and at each end is a wooden construction (3 upright 'stumps' and two 'bails' across the top) about 3 foot high (I think), called a 'wicket'. The equivalent to the pitcher, the 'bowler', sends the ball from one end of the pitch to the other, where the batsman stands. The bowler is allowed a run-up, but must not bend their arm in 'bowling' the ball. The ball is usually expected to bounce once before reaching the batsman (a 'full-toss' is allowed, as long as it is not over waist height). The best bowlers can achieve speeds of over 90 miles per hour, although there are also slower 'spin bowlers' who operate by making the ball deviate off the pitch, confusing the batsman. Bowlers operate in tandem, bowling six deliveries in turn (called 'overs'), before another bowler must come on bowling from the opposite direction. A team usually has at least 4 of its 11 as specialised bowlers, with limited batting skills. There are no 'designated hitters'.

    The batsman take up position at either end of the pitch, one to receive the ball, one waiting his turn. A batsman's bat is thick and has a flat surface, so it is much easier to hit balls than with a baseball bat. If the batsman hits the ball (or even if he doesn't, if the fielders are sloppy) he has the option to run, but is not required to do so. Batsmen run up down the pitch from end to end, crossing over, so if an odd number of runs is scored the batsman facing the next delivery will be different. If the ball runs all the way to the edge of the field, 4 runs are added, except if the ball did not bounce in getting there, in which case 6 is scored. Total runs scored in an innings will almost always run into the hundreds, so the balance of power in the game is somewhat switched round from baseball.

    The job of the fielding side is to get all the batsmen out before too many runs are scored. 10 outs (or 'wickets', yes I know this is the same name as the wooden thing, it's confusing) are required to end an innings, leaving one batsmen of the 11 stranded with no partner to continue the innings. Wickets can be achieved in the following ways: bowled (bowler manages to hit the wicket with the ball), caught (obvious), LBW ('leg before wicket', essentially getting your legs in the way of the ball hitting the wicket, but it's a bit more complicated than that) and run out (the fielders get the ball to the wicket while the batsmen are still running). There are a few more technical ones I won't go into here.

    A common format for the game is 'limited overs' where there is only one innings each and the innings end after a set number of overs, even if 10 wickets haven't been taken. This lasts no more than 6-7 hours. The longest (and arguably most prestigious) form of the game is the international 'Test matches' which have two innings each and no restriction on the number of overs, save a time limit of five days.

    Apologies if that was too much. I love talking about cricket. Anyway. the best description of cricket (not mine, it's old, I don't know where it comes from) goes as follows:

    You have two sides, one out in the field and one in.
    Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out.
    When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out.
    Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
    When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in.
    There are two men called umpires who stay all out the time and they decide when the men who are in are out.
    When both sides have been in and all the men have been given out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game.
    It's actually entirely accurate. Cricket terminology is such great fun.
    "What if strange things happened all the time?"
    "That’d be very strange."
    "No, that’s the point, it’d be normal."
    Allan Ahlberg


    Ever wondered what would have happened if Voldemort had chosen his enemy differently? Read the Neville Longbottom saga:


  4. #94
    h_vic
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Neville's Girl
    Are there any specific housing codes in England? I know there are some in France like "There must be two doors separating the kitchen from the bathroom."
    Yes, there are reams and reams of building regulations that cover all sorts of different provisions (like for example, off the top of my head, sound-proofing between floors).

    Quote Originally Posted by Neville's Girl
    Also (I know it sounds stupid) do a lot of people live in Bristol?
    Yep, it's a major city - you'd be looking at several hundred thousand people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neville's Girl
    How far long a drive is it to London from Bristol? (If you take the motorway.)
    Well, I just AA route-planner-ed it for you and it's about 2hrs 20 which is around what I thought. Obviously, that's guildhall to guildhall, and it's going to vary greatly depending on where in London you want to go - it can take several hours to drive across London in itself.

    ~Hannah

    EDIT: Oops, looks like TyrannoLaurus beat me to it.

  5. #95
    Horsesbella219
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Love_is_4ever
    Would you call an Emergency Room at a hospital an "ER"?

    It may seem random, but I want to make sure...

    ~ Samarie

    Where i live, we cal it A&E...short for accident and emergancy

  6. #96
    apollo13
    Guest
    The A&E is more of a general depatrment than and actually room - A&E would have wards and such as well, whereas casulty would simply be the area where you would be treated, although it would be within A&E.

    ~Evie

  7. #97
    L_edge
    Guest

    Random Payphone question...

    Hi,
    I don’t live in England so I don’t know this type of thing, can anyone help me out?

    1) How much money would it take to make a regular, local call over a payphone in London? What about during the marauder era? Would the price change that much over a thirty-year period?
    2) Is/was there such a thing as “operators” or “information” people who you can call in order to find out the listed numbers or addresses if you’re urgently looking for someone? What number would you have to dial?
    Thanks in advance…

  8. #98
    emmaholloway
    Guest
    There are many many many directory enquiry lines.
    it used to be just 100 (I believe) which you can still use but you are more likely to use one of the more publicised ones now.
    118 118 (men with funny mustaches) or 118 007 ( yellow pages) or 118 500 (bt)

    During the marauderer era I think there was only bt to opperate telephone lines. Which meant that by comparisson the prices were alot higher than they are now, taking inflation into consideration. I don't know how much though. sorry.
    But nowadays you can make a phone call for next to nothing. Like 6p for an hour if it's landline to landline. From a phone box it is minimum 40p but it used to be minimum 30p if you are doing during hogwarts era.

  9. #99
    CCCC
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by L_edge
    Hi,
    I don’t live in England so I don’t know this type of thing, can anyone help me out?

    1) How much money would it take to make a regular, local call over a payphone in London? What about during the marauder era? Would the price change that much over a thirty-year period?
    Now, it's pay as you go, averages out at about a penny a second with a minimum of about 40p. (Although that's anecdotal experience I've been told of much cheaper ones but never seen any).


    Marauder era would have been very different, decimilisation (change to pounds and pence) you'd want to look for someone who remembers (or admits to remembering) the seventies. It'd be a lot lower then, inflation etc has had a huge effect since the seventies.

    2) Is/was there such a thing as “operators” or “information” people who you can call in order to find out the listed numbers or addresses if you’re urgently looking for someone? What number would you have to dial?
    Thanks in advance…
    Yes, in the HP era it would've been reached by dialling 192 for domestic and 153 for foreign. The multiple numbers didn't come in till 2003, so not until after the last book.

  10. #100
    kathyhermy123
    Guest
    British English A to Zed

    This is just a handy book for all those looking for a lexicon of Briticisms (and Americanisms). With nearly 5,500 words and phrases, it is very complete and helpful for beta-readers and writers from all over, though particularly those from the USA.

    ~Kathy

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