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Thread: Being British Number Seven

  1. #31
    hpheart
    Guest
    Schmergo,

    1.We can't quite do that, but yes, we do have chocolate milk!(And its gorgeous)

    2.Well my family and friends do, but thats just us...

    3.Erm, maybe...

  2. #32
    how I live now
    Guest
    Not unless I am SEVERLY deprived, us Brits don't really drink chocolate milk a lot. Not as much as Americans do anyway. It's more of a treat that a drink.

    Santa Claus is used almost as much as Father Christmas now, but that's only because of American influence. But Santa would be fine to use. And I cannot WAIT to see how that story pans out.

    I'm not so sure about the Napolean thing. I don't really hear about Napolean much but then it might just be because I'm noy 'upper-class' enough. Ah well...

    I hope I answered all your questions (apart from the Napolean one) ok!

  3. #33
    TyrannoLaurus
    Guest
    For the Napolean question, I think it works in that context okay. I mean, yes he was an enemy to England but he's not in the same league as Hitler and Stalin. If you wanted to be more British use Oliver Cromwell, though. He was also a military genius and naturally born leader - being the one to create the New Model Army and become Lord Protector of England during the Interregnum - and a very angry bloke with a dangerously high opinion of himself, hee! Although, he wasn't short.


    And I drink chocolate milk. So does my dad. I wouldn't say they were a treat - you can buy chocolate milk from most convenience stores for the same price as pop. Many cafeteria's have the Nestle chocolate milk and the cartons Mars chocolate milk are popular. They have been for a few years, too. As for white chocolate, I don't think we do.

  4. #34
    CCCC
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by emmaholloway
    Well. In the late 90s ( or early 2000s) there was an advert in which people were on the phone and were going 'WAZZZZZZZZZZZUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUP' (all with their tounge sticking out and really wide mouthed and drawn out) and for AGES people would go round saying that.

    But generally what's up would not be used as a greeting.
    True, but you have to remember that the HP books are not set now, iirc they're set circa 16-11 years ago or so, we've become a lot more americanised in our speech in that last decade or so.

    For the Napolean question, I think it works in that context okay. I mean, yes he was an enemy to England but he's not in the same league as Hitler and Stalin. If you wanted to be more British use Oliver Cromwell, though. He was also a military genius and naturally born leader - being the one to create the New Model Army and become Lord Protector of England during the Interregnum - and a very angry bloke with a dangerously high opinion of himself, hee! Although, he wasn't short.
    Call me cynical but the standard response would probably be 'who?'. Go with Napoleon.

    *resists historical debate about Cromwell*

  5. #35
    kathyhermy123
    Guest
    Chocolate milk - Well, a bit. Some love it, some don't, you can get it in most supermarkets, but not in a cafateria, (sorry if the spelling is off) usually.

    Santa Claus - well, the real nitwits where I live would say 'who?' if they heard Father Christmas, whereas mention 'Santy' and they'll go off on a torrent about what they want for Christmas. Actually, some non-nitwits might say not know who Father Christmas is either. Bad sign.

    Napolean - yea, Napolean works. Cromwell would work better for the Irish - we hated him with a passion. That's the thing about murderous guys with huge armies and sycopathic tendendencies (ok, please pardon my spelling. It's pretty bad today). First he killed a bunch of us, then he insulted one of our provinces ('Your choice - to hell or to Connacht!'). Whereas Napolean did pretty much the same to England, except that he tried to take it over instead of insulting it.

    Sorry if I've been rambleing a bit, and good luck with the story!

    ~Kathy

  6. #36
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    If a character is Irish, you'd be more likely to hear about what the English did to the Irish for so many years that made Cromwell seem what he was to the English. It all depends on the POV you're working from, where someone's sympathies lie, etc.

  7. #37
    jediprankster
    Guest

    Quick easy question.

    First, I am aware that us Americans have taken rugby, wussified it, and named it football. As a result, football got renamed soccer. My question is, do any brits say soccer, or is it always called football? I only ask this because my (American) copies of Harry Potter all say soccer. There are references to Dean Thomas hanging posters of the West Ham soccer club on the walls of the dormitory, and Ron poking them with his finger in an attempt to make the players move. I know that some things, like the title to the first book, were changed for the American market, but there are many distinctly British words and phrases which remain intact in the American editions. The soccer thing always bugged me because I knew these were British books, and this was the only thing I noticed that had been made American.

    Bottom line: Is it always football, or has American influence resulted in soccer being used sometimes?

  8. #38
    Fly to Dawn
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by jediprankster
    First, I am aware that us Americans have taken rugby, wussified it, and named it football. As a result, football got renamed soccer. My question is, do any brits say soccer, or is it always called football? I only ask this because my (American) copies of Harry Potter all say soccer. There are references to Dean Thomas hanging posters of the West Ham soccer club on the walls of the dormitory, and Ron poking them with his finger in an attempt to make the players move. I know that some things, like the title to the first book, were changed for the American market, but there are many distinctly British words and phrases which remain intact in the American editions. The soccer thing always bugged me because I knew these were British books, and this was the only thing I noticed that had been made American.

    Bottom line: Is it always football, or has American influence resulted in soccer being used sometimes?

    Football, definitely. I've never seen the word 'soccer' used in England. I assume 'football' was changed to 'soccer', as 'jumper' was changed to 'sweater', along with other little things in the American editions :-)

  9. #39
    TyrannoLaurus
    Guest
    I agree with Dawnie. In fact, when I think of soccer I specifically think of America and often get soccer mixed up with American football (as in, that game where you run around with huge body gear and helmets on!) It also gets called Footie a lot.

    And Cromwell is known by most British people. I've actually polled about thirty randomers about it. The Civil War isn't taught as much as the Tudors, Victorians and Romans in schools (which is a shame!) but Cromwell is well known. And he was absolutely evil to the Irish ... but I won't go into that otherwise I'll never get my packing done!

  10. #40
    ElizabethR.Austin
    Guest

    Scottish Traditions

    I am currently working with a character that is of Scottish origin. I already did the research for her last name, but what I am not sure on is any social differences I should be aware of. Are there any certian words in dialect or certian behaviors that should be evident in such a character?

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