Page 12 of 16 FirstFirst ... 21011121314 ... LastLast
Results 111 to 120 of 156

Thread: Being British Act VI

  1. #111
    Mistletoe
    Guest
    Oh man, I'm so confused about tea!

    Good thing I've got you guys around to set me straight!

    Now I'm off, to write... about tea...

  2. #112
    Merlynne
    Guest
    Another location question!
    What would be the dodgiest area of London (residential) where one might be able to find a very cheap, run-down apartment building?
    Also, what would be an approximate monthly rent for a small one bedroom apartment in said area? I did some research, but the cheapest rents I could find listed were in the 2200 range (but of course, real estate websites don't make it easy to find the grubbiest apartments online).
    It's a small part of my story, but I want it to be as accurate as possible. I hope I'm not asking too much.

  3. #113
    emmaholloway
    Guest
    Peckham is a pretty dodge area. If you look it up on google you will see that alot of scary crime things go on around there. Not good. I always try to avoid going to peckham.
    I'm not sure how much you would pay monthly but an average flat is about 140,000.

    Deptford also. I used to go to the parks there when I was younger and I was never allowed to play in the sandbox because there used to be needles found in them. And I think once the bones of some animal or something. Again I don't know much about prices of rent, but it wouldn't be high.

    I only really know about my surrounding area (of which these are a part of... slightly worrying)

    ooooooh. i've done some looking up. On one of the websites there was a large one bed appartment in deptford for 140 p/w. And that actually looked quite nice.

    Peckham was about the same for a nice flat. Every place seemed to be all modern and just done up. So you could probably knock quite a bit off for an ugly place.

  4. #114
    Merlynne
    Guest
    Thank you very much! I will google those places and take a pick, but I'm leaning towards Deptford. Thanks for the price range. I'll run with that

  5. #115
    The Marauding Cupcake
    Guest

    Question Questioning context - "Knocked for six"?

    I was looking for another word for "shocked" and right-clicked for synonyms. I'm American and I have the language set for English (United Kingdom) to more easily catch British mispellings (on my part). When I read the synonyms, the one at the end read "knocked for six".

    What does this refer to? How is it used or what would it be used to describe?

    Thanks for any help.

    ~ Michelle

  6. #116
    Sixth Year Slytherin
    Snape's Not Evil?

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    394
    It's a cricketing term. When you knock a ball for six you knock it out of the boundary and so have to give it a good whack. So getting knocked for six would mean something has hit your hard or really knocked you back. I'd say it's not as common now as it used to be.

    Examples of use would be:

    "I caught a really bad cold that knocked me for six"

    *My cousin's death has really knocked me for six."

    "Doing badly in that exam knocked me for six."

    It's less about being shocked, I think, and more about suffering a real blow or set back.
    Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

    Alexander Pope

  7. #117
    witch6
    Guest
    Hey!! thanks for your help.. i'll make my OC live in Islington then..

    apollo13, heather25x - well, joint families are two or more families living together, they are generally related though. it can two brothers and their families, etc. I guess, they are not at all common out there but here (where i live), it's petty common, and as my OC is also from India, i wanted to confirm!

    emmaholloway- when i said business connected to medicines, i meant like a medicine's distributor or a pharmacist or a manufacture, etc..

    Anyway, thanks a lot!! and i'm for the pigeons out there at Tamflagar (i'm sorry i forgot the name of the square!) Square. All of us (the people living on this beautiful planet, i mean) really need to buck up and save our earth from destruction! yes, i'm pointing out to global warming, pollution, extinction of animals, growing up animals so that we can kill and eat them one day and so much more! uuh.. we really need to save earth!! (I'm really sorry, mods!! i promise i'll never spam again! its just that this is one topic i'm really sensetive about.. Sorry! won't happen again!)

  8. #118
    Nymphadora
    Guest
    More clarification on what terms we use for particular meals.

    Breakfast - obviously the same in the US, but sometimes we shorten it to 'breakie'.

    Lunch - Lunch in the South of England, Dinner in the North.

    Dinner - Dinner in the South of England, Tea in the North.

    Supper - Snack before bedtime.

    Note: Tea in the 1940 and before was usually a cold meal, eaten by the middle and upper classes, (i.e. sandwiches and cake accompanied by a pot of tea) and then supper was a hot meal usually eaten by the adults after the children had gone to bed. Although that tradition of a cold tea at around 4-5pm has been lost and is replaced by the terms as decribed above.

    Also some information on Spinners End. There are a couple of Spinners End's in the UK, the first is in Cradley Health, West Midlands. The second is in Weston-Super-Mare, Avon. There are probably some more dotted about too. I agree it sounds like somewhere up North, but not necessarily. It does, however, sound as though is has some link to a mill town, but there were plenty of them in Southern England also.

    About Bonfire Night, traditionally we would eat Bonfire Toffee sometimes called Treacle Toffee, possibly Toffee Apples, Baked Potatoes or as we usually do Potato Pie, or Tatty Ash (which is like potato pie but without the crust - more of a stew) - both are usually served with pickled red cabbage or beetroots. I'm from the North of England though and it's quite possible that they have different things in Southern England.

    Hope that helps!

  9. #119
    Sixth Year Slytherin
    Snape's Not Evil?

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    394
    Lunch - Lunch in the South of England, Dinner in the North.

    Dinner - Dinner in the South of England, Tea in the North.
    Be wary of a broad brush stroke here. I live in the North but have always used Lunch and Dinner. It's common to hear both used. Can't speak for the South.

    And pigeons are clever devils. There are still pigeons in Trafalgar Square and always will be as long as there are tourists feeding them. Fat pigeons at that. We get an awful lot of pigeons all over the country, usually where people lunch. I don't think culls have had much impact generally speaking... and it's a touchy subject, culling birds.

    And I completely agree about Spinner's End. The general consensus is northern mill town, but the mills stretched across the backbone of the country... anywhere there was a good water supply really. Some places, such as Lancashire and West Yorkshire became huge mill areas because of the water and the hills, but the Midlands had its fair share of industry. Still, having grown up in a mill town I can't help but see it as Lancashire or Yorkshire; the image Jo gives us is so indicative of those areas.
    Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

    Alexander Pope

  10. #120
    Nymphadora
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Magical Maeve
    Be wary of a broad brush stroke here. I live in the North but have always used Lunch and Dinner. It's common to hear both used. Can't speak for the South.
    I should have mentioned that there are always exceptions, it's very hard to generalise the whole country into two categories. I suppose it depends upon where your family originates from too, people move across the North/South Divide all the time taking their customs and quirks with them. It's something everyone should take into account with all information they are given.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •