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Thread: Being British Act VI

  1. #101
    Heather25x
    Guest
    I wouldn't necessarily be raining. It hasn't rained where i live for a week. It might be cold out, but it is very traditional to have a bonfire and to roast food on that. Like potatoes, and other BBQ food, like Apollo13 said. It's cold this time of year, yes, but that's why we have the bonfire's and use them as the BBQ.

    It's not the kind of holiday you would come home for. Not like Christmas. It's the kind of holiday you would go and see fireworks shows at, but you wouldn't make a special visit home for it.

    But if it's a dry day/night then yes, a BBQ.

    The Weasley's might have fun setting off fireworks (oh, the fun of writing Arthur in that story). The boys at home could make the bonfire and then they could all roast their food on it. Hope i helped. Have fun

  2. #102
    Pondering
    Guest
    Okay...here is a question from a snow deprived Aussie...

    In an neighbourhood like Spinner's End where Snape grew up, would it snow in winter? I'm thinking around Christmas to the end of January. What temperatures would it reach?

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    --Tash

  3. #103
    Heather25x
    Guest
    It depends were Spinner's End is, really, but i would say that it would reach at the coldest, -11 degrees celcius, if you want it the coldest it gets. But it's not likely to snow until late January, early February.

  4. #104
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    Although Snape, Lily and Petunia don't show even the remotest signs of holding the regional accent, I had always mentally placed Spinners End in South Yorkshire - specifically Sheffield, Barnsley or perhaps Bradford. The description of the houses under the shadow of the mill surely refers to a Northern Industrial town, and as much as I might talk about Lancashire, I think that the description of the street is more of a Yorkshire style. Of course that could just be me.

    Anyway, if we assume that Snape took his mothers accent, and Lily and Petunia were quick to ditch theirs to adapt to the company they keep, I'd say it was very likely that you'd have snow at Spinners End. Certain places in the country are more geographically prone to it, and I'd say those areas of Yorkshire get their fair share, being about as inland as they can be, while still having the North Sea as the nearest body of water. We get sod all around here, because we're only about 15/20 miles inland, and it's by the Irish Sea, which is positively warm compared to the North Sea (which easily get's into my top three grimmest bodies of water).

    But I ramble. Snow? Yes.

  5. #105
    Mistletoe
    Guest
    Random, but what is the British term for nightgown? If it's even different than that.

  6. #106
    Cedric'sGirl
    Guest
    Mistletoe: nightgown would be fine, or nightie would probably be more common, if you wanted to shorten it.

    Pondering: from the description, I think the general consensus is that Spinners End is somewhere in the north of England, and if you consider that Sev and Lily were growing up in the 1960's, it is likely that they would still receive some snow in the winter, and the temperature would probably reach about a low of - 10-15 degrees centigrade.

    tha_looney_one: for bonfire night, my family's tradition has always been to have a big bonfire and fireworks in the garden, with all of the neighbours invited round for jacket potatoes and chile, with sticky toffee pudding for desert - yum! although another traditional food would be parkin - a kind of stodgy ginger cake that I could definitely imagine Mrs Weasley making!

  7. #107
    Mistletoe
    Guest
    NEW QUESTION! I'm so American, I don't even know what to do with myself!

    Er, anyway, could someone kindly describe to me the process of making tea, and around what time of day does it occur?

  8. #108
    TyrannoLaurus
    Guest
    Although Snape, Lily and Petunia don't show even the remotest signs of holding the regional accent, I had always mentally placed Spinners End in South Yorkshire - specifically Sheffield, Barnsley or perhaps Bradford.
    *now has visions of Snape walking through Barnsley town centre and getting sneered at by all the chavs*

    I always had north in mind. More Manchester than Sheffield, though. Although, hmmm, Snape and Lily coming from Barnsley - I could use that for the latest one-shot challenge! Hehe. It would be a laugh.

    Er, anyway, could someone kindly describe to me the process of making tea, and around what time of day does it occur?
    Do you mean tea as in dinner or tea as the drink? I assume making tea (drink) is the same in England as it is in America. As for tea (dinner), families can have this any time between 5 and 8 (or 10, if you're in my family, because it takes dad that long to do the preparations). Many use tea as a synomyn to dinner - so it can be any hearty meal with vegetables, cooked meat, lasagne, pasta, curry e.t.c.

    However, the more technical term is used for a light afternoon snack. This involves sandwiches, crisps (potato chips), fresh juice, cold meats, salad e.t.c Obviously, it's more appropriate for summer. Some people have tea and then later on have supper (something smaller, such as a piece of cake and some hot chocolate, or if you're my dad youll have a big can of soup with lots of soggy bread). However, most people just have tea.

  9. #109
    Mistletoe
    Guest
    Wonderful, wonderful. That was absolutely wonderful

    But for you know, the 1970's, people would be using tea kettles and leaves and whatnot, correct? Or no... I'm slightly um, befuddled is the word.

  10. #110
    apollo13
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by emmaholloway
    a bbq?? in november!! it's far too cold for a barbeque and will probably be raining. my house always has jacket potatoes. But there really isnt anything traditional about it. Just the fireworks.

    They live near a hill i think so they might go up there to look at all the fireworks going off around them. or have a big bonfire in there garden.
    Well, I live in the warmest county in England. It might well be cold, but we'll still have a BBQ in thick coats and gloves!!

    But for you know, the 1970's, people would be using tea kettles and leaves and whatnot, correct? Or no... I'm slightly um, befuddled is the word.
    No - teabags were around at that time, I believe.

    ~Evie

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