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Thread: FRENCH Culture Help

  1. #11
    mooncalf
    Guest
    I'm sorry, I wan't very clear. I meant that the croissants and everything are more the stereotypical breakfast, but the modern French person is not going to have time to eat a huge breakfast. It's like how everyone thinks all French people eat snails and frogs' legs, but they're more a delicacy than the norm.

  2. #12
    The Half Blood Prince
    Guest
    If a french family hadn't any chores or jobs to do on a Saturday morning, for instance, would it then be more likely they had the stereotypical breakfast than if not?

    Also, does the general group of french students have school in the weekend?

  3. #13
    HPobsession
    Guest
    I think that French kids have school on Saturdays. At least that's what my French teacher said. I'm not sure about the breakfast thing...

  4. #14
    mooncalf
    Guest
    If a french family hadn't any chores or jobs to do on a Saturday morning, for instance, would it then be more likely they had the stereotypical breakfast than if not?
    It's really up to you. If you want them to have what is universally known as a French breakfast, go with coppercurls suggestions. Mine was for mornings where everyone is rushing off to school or work.

    Also, does the general group of french students have school in the weekend?
    Most have a half day on Wednesdays and Saturdays, but a lot of French students go home for lunch even on normal days, since their break is usually between one and one and a half hopurs long. Sunday is a day off. Also (just in case you're not already keeling over with useless information), they usually start about eight and finish about five, or twelve on a half day.

  5. #15
    lolita
    Guest
    If a french family hadn't any chores or jobs to do on a Saturday morning, for instance, would it then be more likely they had the stereotypical breakfast than if not?
    My dad has a best friend from college, who happens to be French. We meet up with him and his family every now and again, and what I've noticed when I'm with them, is they don't eat many snacks, for one. They'll stick to the basic three meals a day, maybe a small dessert after dinner or in between lunch and dinner. Every meal is a sit-down meal with the entire family. Breakfast isn't typically large, nor is dinner, and lunch is, by far, the largest meal of the day. Bread is served at every meal. We'll usually eat brioche, toasted, with butter, jam, or Nutella for breakfast. (Nutella is an amazing peanut butter like substance except it's chocolate! Mmm...)

    Baguettes accompany lunch and dinner. Everything eaten in a day is balanced. Say, if someone has to rush off somewhere after lunch and the meal has to be shortened, dinner is prolonged later than usual... which is very late, as after dinner, we'd normally sit around the table sipping wine and eating cheese. This may sound like a stereotype, but I promise, it's what we actually did.

    Both children and adults indulge in wine, as well. The legal drinking age in France is much younger than most places, about fourteen I think. Yet, if with their parents, children under that age may have alcoholic beverages at restaurants if their prents order it for them. There's so much to tell, so much I want to add and not forget, my mind is going all over the place. Sorry if this is hard to follow.

    Oh, yes. When eating in France, most meals are eaten at home on the weekends. During the work week, lunch is most likely eaten at school for children or at a café with a glass of wine for adults. The weekend is different as well! Saturday is a school and work day for children and adults, while Wednesday is a day off.

    The most important thing to remember when writing about French and their food is that they savor it. Very rarely will you see someone tear off a bit of baguette to eat on the go as they run to work.

    Good luck with your fic!

  6. #16
    mecredi
    Guest
    my sister did foreign exchange in paris for a summer

    for breakfast on weekends they mostly had crepes with nutella or jam, other times pain au chocolat

  7. #17
    Tinn Tam
    Guest
    I'm French...

    The regular French beakfast would be a bowl of cereals with milk and a glass of juice, OR coffee with bread (with butter or jam or Nutella), OR hot chocolate.

  8. #18
    beccleroo
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by lolita
    Both children and adults indulge in wine, as well. The legal drinking age in France is much younger than most places, about fourteen I think. Yet, if with their parents, children under that age may have alcoholic beverages at restaurants if their prents order it for them.
    The actual drinking age (Legally) is 18, but its not enforced really.

    If anyone does a French fic that involves lots of good French food. Include Nutella, its heaven in a jar.

  9. #19
    hermy_loves_ron
    Guest
    Sorry if this belongs in the language thread instead, I wasn't sure!

    In and around the time period of the French Revolution (more specifically 1792) what languages would it be plausible for the French to speak? I'm aware that centuries ago it was pretty normal for children to be multi-lingual, especially in Europe. The languages I'd thought of were French (obviously), English, German, and Italian. Not every French person would be able to speak all of those, of course, but overall, those seemed like they might be relatively common. I just need a way for the students of Beauxbatons, Durmstrang, and Hogwarts to have only one language in common with all three of them: English. Am I totally off on this?

    Thanks!

  10. #20
    SiriuslyMental
    Guest
    I think that it would actually be more likely if they spoke French? I dunno. French was really big for a long time.

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