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Thread: Being British #5

  1. #41
    thegirllikeme
    Guest
    Quick question about English punctuation. I've heard that Mr and Mrs are spelled without the period. Is that the same with all abbreviations like St. and etc?

  2. #42
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    A quick answer would be "It depends." The Harry Potter books I have don't use periods for Mr and Mrs, and though I don't have an example on hand, I would be astonished if this didn't apply to St or Dr. Of course I've seen other pieces where the period is used, in which case it's probably used throughout. My advice would be to just remain consistent in your approach. Periods for all, or periods for none. A grammar expert will be here soon to prove me wrong.

    And now, a return to the magical world of football!!!

    It's worth bearing in mind that star players like David Beckham, Thierry Henry and even - to a lesser extent - Zinedine Zidane, were all knee high to a grasshopper when Harry starts Hogwarts...well, maybe not, but they certainly weren't famous then.

    Philosophers Stone = 1991/2
    Deathly Hallows = 1998/9

    From the mid-eighties to early nineties (say, 1994). I'd suggest that the main English superstar would be Gary Lineker, a mild mannered striker who went on to be the second highest scorer for England. Also of note is Paul Gascoigne (popularly known as "Gazza"), who was a flamboyant midfielder, known for his skill, cheek, drinking, and - oddly enough - crying. See "Italia 90 semi final" for details.

    In the mid nineties, your main superstar has be Alan Shearer, a mild mannered striker. For some time he was the most expensive footballer in Britain, consistently top scorer in the league, and reliable at international level. Clubs had their stars, but of the England national side it has to be Shearer.

    By 1998-2000, Shearer is still around but it getting on a bit, and the England team is focused around the two new young stars of David Beckham, whom it's fair to say you know, and Michael Owen, yet another mild mannered striker.

    Mid 2000s to present. Although Beckham is the celebrity of the England squad, the players the fans respected most at this time are probably Wayne Rooney - a delightfully obnoxious though undeniably talented youngster, and Steven Gerrard - an extremely aggressive and yet somehow still mild mannered midfielder.

    ------

    It is worth pointing out that in reality kids are more likely to think of the superstar of the team they support, rather than their country. So while Alan Shearer might have been ten times the player Don Hutchinson was, Dean Thomas is more likely to cite the latter because he plays for West Ham. Equally, while Harry was at school, any kid who supported Manchester United would have wanted to be Eric Cantona - a frenchman. If you're going to go into real specifics, I'd be happy to help, but as a rule you might find it easier to not drop too many names. It depends on how much detail you want I suppose.

    ------

    Finally, there is the world scale. This is nice as simple thankfully. Although there have been a whole host of "the best player in the world"s over the years, and they have come from all manner of countries - George Weah from Liberia, Andrei Schevchenko from the Ukraine, Marcelo Salas of Chile, to name but a few - most of them won't be remembered, because the only ones the history books have any time for in the last two decades, are Brazilian forwards whose name begins with Ro.

    So.

    1990-1996 - The best player in the world is: Romario
    1997-2002 - The best player in the world is: Ronaldo
    2003-2007 - The best player in the world is: Ronaldinho

    That's about the long and short of it. Obviously those in the know will disagree with the specifics, but that's just about the way it works. Sorry George. First the General Election, and now this.

  3. #43
    Poppet
    Guest
    Mr and Mrs no longer need a full stop (period) after them in general use. St (as in Saint) doesn't either, and neither does Dr (for Doctor). However, when the abbreviation St. is used for street, it should have a full stop after it. Otherwise, it looks like you've got confused as to were the title goes (and some streets are named after saints anyway - there's one near where I live called Saint Edeyrns Street. It abbreviates to St Edeyrns st. )

  4. #44
    CCCC
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by AurorKeefy
    And now, a return to the magical world of football!!!

    It's worth bearing in mind that star players like David Beckham, Thierry Henry and even - to a lesser extent - Zinedine Zidane, were all knee high to a grasshopper when Harry starts Hogwarts...well, maybe not, but they certainly weren't famous then.

    Philosophers Stone = 1991/2
    Deathly Hallows = 1998/9

    From the mid-eighties to early nineties (say, 1994). I'd suggest that the main English superstar would be Gary Lineker, a mild mannered striker who went on to be the second highest scorer for England. Also of note is Paul Gascoigne (popularly known as "Gazza"), who was a flamboyant midfielder, known for his skill, cheek, drinking, and - oddly enough - crying. See "Italia 90 semi final" for details.

    In the mid nineties, your main superstar has be Alan Shearer, a mild mannered striker. For some time he was the most expensive footballer in Britain, consistently top scorer in the league, and reliable at international level. Clubs had their stars, but of the England national side it has to be Shearer.
    Eh, late mid-late 90s were when Zidane was in his prime (and best in the world) and Beckham was absurdly famous then, marrying a popstar etc etc. I think Giggs was also highly popular before that, had his own television show etc.

    One day I won't argue with people

  5. #45
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    David Beckham, Thierry Henry and even - to a lesser extent - Zinedine Zidane, were all knee high to a grasshopper when Harry starts Hogwarts...well, maybe not, but they certainly weren't famous then.


    fiftyfiftyfiftyfiftyfiftyfiftyfifty............... .................................................. ...............

  6. #46
    Seventh Year Ravenclaw
    Attending a Deathday Party
    Gmariam's Avatar
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    What might be some common holiday traditions (for Christmas or the New Year) that one might incorporate into a story set during this season? The year is 1979/1980 as well. I imagine there are several, so I'd just like a few that are celebrated by a majority of people and might translate well into a mixed Muggle/Wizard household. Thanks so much!!
    ~Gina

  7. #47
    Diamond Quill
    Guest
    Weeeell, to start with there's Christmas Dinner. Turkey, chipolatas with bacon wrapped round them, cranberry sauce, stuffing, sprouts, roast potatoes and Christmas pudding with brandy on top that is set alight are all good examples of traditional Christmas food in the U.K.

    Dinner is served around 1.00 pm and before hand many British families (more so in the time period you've mentioned than nowadays) go to Church in the morning for a special Christmas service, some even go at Midnight on Christmas Eve. This is known as Midnight Mass.

    Another Tradition is to go carol singing to raise money for charity.

    Other winter traditions include: ice skating/sledging/watching lots of films on television, partying on New Years Eve and eating a LOT of food.

    Hope that helps!

  8. #48
    Fourth Year Gryffindor
    Snape Hates Me
    moonymaniac's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    I was wondering if anyone might know about the railway system in the UK. Specifically, do you know if there are any places that the track would go through tunnels that would be dug through the earth? Our system runs through tunnels under the mountains in various regions, ie the Smokey's and Rockies, etc...But, I'm not sure how mountainous any region of the UK is, never having had the pleasure to visit.

  9. #49
    crazy_purple_hp_freak
    Guest
    ^^ I don't think so, well not on any trains that I've been on ...
    Tracks tend to go around the mountains, not through them. They can go through tunnels *above* ground, but not under.

    In London and some other cities, there's the under ground tube-train system which runs below the ground. And obviously, there's the Eurotunnel system between England and France.

    Hope that helps.

  10. #50
    apollo13
    Guest
    England is pretty flat. In the west, it's very hilly, but I think the mountains are mainly in Wales.

    Where I live, what we consider a mountain is nothing more than a gentle slope to most people. Seriously, it's like Holland.

    I agree with Suzie, they're more likely to go around a mountain or hill than through it. However, the London Underground is all tunnels, and you sometimes get tunnels under bridges and motorways in the cities.

    ~Evie

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