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Thread: Being British #5

  1. #121
    **plotbunnies**
    Guest
    As far as I know, no.

    I don't exactly live in England, as I have said before on this thread, but Ireland is close.

    I don't have time now to elaborate, sorry!

    ~Anne

  2. #122
    kathyhermy123
    Guest
    MrsRuebeusHagridDursley, yes, kiss is used, anyone with a half-decent TV would know what 'make out' means (though it's not used as much over here), snogging is more serious, and an alternative is to 'meet' someone. At least in Ireland, if you say that you 'met' a guy, that means that you were making out. As rita_skeeter already pointed out, 'getting off' would be the most common.

    BloodRayne, the life insurance buisness is alive and running. Social Security is called the DWP (department of work and pension).

    nikkiolapotter, I have never heard the phrase before, so I assume that, if it is used, it is uncommon. More likely, however, is that it is just an Americanism.

    ~Kathy

  3. #123
    R_Ravenclaw
    Guest
    So British have any slang for the Police. In America we call them "cops" (well, I don't. I have a tendency to use the old 60s and 70s slang and call them the "fuzz". But I'm just weird that way )

  4. #124
    Amber0_o
    Guest
    Okay, random question here, but are there any really popular children's games played for two people.

    And when I say games, I mean things like 'duck, duck, goose' or 'tag', but I need something that would be fine for only two people to play together.

    It doesn't have to be played only in Great Britain, but it should be relativly well-known there.


    (Thank you all)

  5. #125
    Schmerg_The_Impaler
    Guest
    In Britain, is the person in the school who gets top grades called the valedictorian, and does he get to make a speech at the end of the year at graduation?

    If not, who makes the speech? I want to write a graduation at the end of one of my fics. Since it's from Hogwarts, I can bend tradition, but I want to know what's typical.

  6. #126
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    Do you ever say 'scooped up'?
    Nope. If that has been said then I can only assume it's a very recent Americanism.

    So British have any slang for the Police. In America we call them "cops" (well, I don't. I have a tendency to use the old 60s and 70s slang and call them the "fuzz". But I'm just weird that way)
    There are, alas, probably hundreds, and they vary from place to place. Cops would be alright in the modern era, because though it is an Americanism it's a fairly long standing one, though I don't know if it would stand up for the Marauders. Pigs (to be ever-so-slightly derogative ) is another recent one. Other more common ones to North England are "The Busys" (?) and "Dibbles" (?!?!?). Of course it is possible that my friend simply made the latter two up, since I had not heard them prior to living with him.

    Okay, random question here, but are there any really popular children's games played for two people.
    I think the girls here might be able to answer this slightly better than I, because when I was young playing with a friend, we'd usually just play small-scale versions of team games like football and cricket. I have vague recollections of watching the girls in my class play bizarre looking games involving string or folded pieces of paper, but I was a boy, and it was lost on me. (Past tense there to denote I'm older, not a change of sex)

    In Britain, is the person in the school who gets top grades called the valedictorian, and does he get to make a speech at the end of the year at graduation?
    The person who gets the top grades is usually called a swot, boffin or teacher's pet, and by graduation has usually been bullied into submission so much that speech making is quite out of the question.
    Again, the graduation ceremony at our high schools and colleges (where college denotes the NEWT years, rather than university) would appear to be vastly different to the American system. At our high school, when we finished our final exams we simply left and only came back to pick up our results (although ironically our year came back after the last exam for a "prom", but that was very recent and previous years hadn't done so). There is no graduation ceremony and certainly no speeches, or at least there wasn't at my school. Again, there might have been a prom that a select few attended at college - but no-one I knew went. We just popped in for fifteen minutes the day our results came in, and we might share them with our friends if any of them happened to be around in that fifteen minute window.
    University was different, with a massive graduation procedure, but then there were several hundred graduates at my graduation, and that was basically just one department. No-one got awards for top marks as I can recall, and all speeches were made by Deans. Chancellors and all other host of useless people who contributed nothing to the University, and some roped in half-celebrity.

    Sorry about that.

  7. #127
    Amber0_o
    Guest
    I think the girls here might be able to answer this slightly better than I, because when I was young playing with a friend, we'd usually just play small-scale versions of team games like football and cricket. I have vague recollections of watching the girls in my class play bizarre looking games involving string or folded pieces of paper, but I was a boy, and it was lost on me. (Past tense there to denote I'm older, not a change of sex)
    Are games like Simon Says played over there?

    Basically this is for a Lily/Severus story, (and they are about nine or ten years old) and Lily is suggesting a bunch of games they can play. So girly games would probably work. Does anyone know what those games are called. I keep thinking of 'Cats Cradle', but I don't know if this is the same thing your thinking of.

  8. #128
    AurorKeefy
    Guest
    Cat's cradle was around - though again I never understood it. Nor indeed would young Severus, so it might take some very patient explaining from Lily. Simon says was also there, but I always thought that was played with a group. *Shrugs*

  9. #129
    Amber0_o
    Guest
    Well, Snape ends up shooting all the game ideas down anyway, so that isn't really the problem. The problem is that I tended to make up my own games with my friends, or played games that required large groups, so it's taxing my brain to come up with 'two people' games. *dies*

    Thanks for your help!

  10. #130
    R_Ravenclaw
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by AurorKeefy
    There are, alas, probably hundreds, and they vary from place to place. Cops would be alright in the modern era, because though it is an Americanism it's a fairly long standing one, though I don't know if it would stand up for the Marauders. Pigs (to be ever-so-slightly derogative ) is another recent one. Other more common ones to North England are "The Busys" (?) and "Dibbles" (?!?!?). Of course it is possible that my friend simply made the latter two up, since I had not heard them prior to living with him.
    The time period I have in mind is the summer before Draco's seventh year. Theoretically, would he say something like "cops"? Because—believe it or not —this is important to the story. Any other slang? Suggestions? Advice? Thanks!

    By the way, this will be in a humour fic, so even any random slang would work

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