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Thread: Being British #5

  1. #111
    Stubbornly_appeared
    Guest

    Lawyer

    Attorney at law is just a fancy way to say lawyer. Here is the Wikipedia definition:

    An attorney at law (also known simply as an attorney or lawyer) in the United States is a person licensed to practice law by the highest court of a state or other jurisdiction. Alternative terms include attorney-at-law and attorney and counselor (or counsellor) at law.
    It then goes on to say that the American legal system has a fused/united profession,and therefore does not discriminate between lawyers that do/do not plea in court. The British system does, so there is the solicitor and barrister/advocate split. The barristers rarely become involved in a case unless they are needed to provide advocacy for their client; the barrister give the solicitors specialized advice and solicitors have more direct contact with the client.

    As you've probably already guessed, I'm doing the August One-Shot Challenge. I think I've figured it out now, so you don't really need t make a comment unless you've got something you need to tell me.

    -reads up on British court procedure and realizes why I don't want to work in law-

    -Stubby

  2. #112
    Schmerg_The_Impaler
    Guest
    This is an extremely important question because an entire STUPID GAG (pun on the phrase 'fantastic beasts and where to find them') depends on this line! So you must handle this question with borderline reverence an possibly rubber gloves!

    No. I'm kidding. It's really not important at all... stupid gags can easily be removed.

    But anyway, do British kids use the word 'beast' to refer to something really good (ie. Jenny does a triple-backflip dive into the swimming pool; Bob says "That was beast!") or to refer to someone really, um, attractive (ie. Bob walks past in his swimsuit, Jenny goes "Oh wow, what a beast!")?

    Where I live, people say those things all the time (and they turn up obnoxiously prevalently in my strange abridged musical revue version of "Beauty and The Beast" that I'm in), but I'm not sure if this is an international thing, an American thing, or a thing started by this guy named Adam who was in my math class two years ago and constantly said stuff like that.

    Oh yeah, and this story is future-gen...

  3. #113
    whatapotter
    Guest
    But anyway, do British kids use the word 'beast' to refer to something really good (ie. Jenny does a triple-backflip dive into the swimming pool; Bob says "That was beast!") or to refer to someone really, um, attractive (ie. Bob walks past in his swimsuit, Jenny goes "Oh wow, what a beast!")?
    Very sorry, but I'd have to say no. I've never even heard of it used in that context. It might just be my sheltered corner of Britain, but I've never used it.

    To refer to something really good: I'd use 'cool' or 'amazing' - (amazing, has actually become one of the most irritating words, because everyone around where I live uses it (with a very annoying aaaamaazing drawl to it). Of course, I'm one of the biggest criminals, lol)

    To refer to someone attractive: I'd stick with the old favourites, 'fit', 'hot' or 'cute'
    (helps a lot that it's a future-gen fic!)

    Hope that helped a bit, (and my reverant rubber gloves were pink, sparkly and had little flowers all over them...)
    xx

  4. #114
    L_edge
    Guest
    OK, I was wondering if someone could help me out on this.

    I’ve never been to a wedding so I don’t know, is there a specific, set number of bridesmaids or does it vary? How many usually are there? How many is considered proper or traditional in Britain?

    Thanks…

  5. #115
    whatapotter
    Guest
    There's not a set number - I think it's up to each bride's personal preference. I know a lot of women who choose to have one Maid of Honour, and then two bridesmaids. However, it's up to you how many you'd like your fic to have really, as I don't believe there's a proper number (not having been a bride yet, heehee!, anyone please correct me!). Most people just choose the number based on who they want to be their bridesmaids - I know one girl who had only one - her sister, and another who had four - a sister, cousin and two best friends.

    Hope I helped!
    xx

  6. #116
    MrsRuebeusHagridDursley
    Guest
    I know that in Britian they used the word "snog" sometimes for "kiss" but is it used commonly. And (I think it is) but is the word "kiss" used as well? Would a snog be more serious than a kiss? Also, in America, a the phrase "make-out" is used to describe a more serious kiss. Is the phrase "make-out" used in Britian, or is there a different phrase/word?

    Sorry about all of the questions, and thanks!

    ~Morgan

  7. #117
    rita_skeeter
    Guest
    The word 'kiss' is definitely used in Britain, and would have been in pretty much any HP era. 'Snog' would be fine for Trio-era and perhaps the Marauders too. Snog implies a more serious kiss, yes.

    However, 'make out' isn't used in Britain at all - we use the phrase 'get off' instead - but this is a very recent phrase, so definitely not good for use in any Trio-era or earlier.

  8. #118
    Second Year Gryffindor
    Beset by Owls
    BloodRayne's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    I wanted to ask about Social Security and Life Insurance - how does Social Security work in Britian? For example, if someone died, would their family get a certain amount of money each month, or is it only for people who retire, e.t.c?

    Also, is it even called Social Security, or is it known by another name?

  9. #119
    Courtneyyy
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BloodRayne
    I wanted to ask about Social Security and Life Insurance - how does Social Security work in Britian? For example, if someone died, would their family get a certain amount of money each month, or is it only for people who retire, e.t.c?

    Also, is it even called Social Security, or is it known by another name?
    My dad works in social security so I know some stuff.

    Well, social security, in the UK, is mainly the government's system of helping people who are less fortunate or have a financial difficulties for one reason or another Eg. old age, disability (so they can't work), single parents, unemployment etc.

    If the sole provider for a household (ie. the person that brought in all the money) died, the family would get some financial help of the government, but not for a lifetime. Another family member/s would be expected to get a job and earn money. If no one else in the family can get a job for example if they are all disabled, they would get disability allowance, to help them. A financial grant, like disability allowance/job seekers allowance etc, is paid weekly and are called benefits.

    Life insurance is completely different :P
    Life insurance is optional. A person can decide to take out life insurance and they pay the insurance company a sum of money ever month or so. Then if the person dies, the money that the person paid the company gets paid out to the family to help with funeral expenses etc.

    Retired people get pensions. I won't explain pensions lol unless you want me to?

    I hope this has helped
    Any other questions, don't hesitate to ask

  10. #120
    nikkiolapotter
    Guest
    Do you ever say 'scooped up'?

    Like, 'Has another man scooped you up before I have?'?

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