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Thread: U.S.A. Culture and Language Help

  1. #141
    herm_own_ninny13
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    Also do New Englanders have a different perspective on life from other Americans? California's been mentioned as less polite so I wondered if there were any regional characteristics for New England (thinking in terms of Boston/Cape Cod here). Is that even New England?
    I'm New Hampshire born and bred, so I think I can answer these
    New England has 6 states: Maine, NH, Vermont, Massachussetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. Sometimes, New York's Westchester County likes to pretend it's part of New England, but usually, we're just those 6.
    New Englanders are fishers, farmers, foresters, and financial advisors. I think Boston has the most colleges per capita of any city in the US. New England is very devoted to their sports teams- Red Sox (baseball), Patriots (American football), Celtics (basketball), Bruins (hockey), and once and a while we cheer for the Revolution (soccer/football). As a general rule, we hate: The New York Yankees, the New York Mets, the New York Giants, and the New York Jets. Yes, that rhymes. We're clever.
    We have four seasons- Beautiful Spring, Brutally Hot Summer, Beautiful Autumn, and Brutally Cold Winter. Or, as some like to say, Winter, Still Winter, Not Winter, and Almost Winter.
    We are horrible drivers.
    We are very friendly, except in Boston. Bostonians are very, very mean. (Not all of them, just the ones that tourists are most likely to see.)

    Language- We say Wicked as an adjective. It can mean whatever you want it- That toast was wicked good, She slapped him wicked hard, I'm wicked cold, That movie was wicked wicked, That (slam-)dunk was wicked sweet.
    We also say sweet. Sweet can be good or bad, just like wicked. If you use them together, you should make sure the context points some clues to what's really being said.

    Life- Small towns are really prevalent here. My mother owns the only store in our village, so consequentially I know every resident (there's not many). When I talk to my friends about things that I do "in my town", I mean the one five miles down the road- the one with the gazebo and the gift shop. If you want hints on New England small-town life, watch one of the earlier episodes of Gilmore Girls. *sqee!*

    The New England perspective on life? Just keep shoveling, because once you stop, the snow will start flyin' again.

    Um, yeah. Sorry for the epic post!

  2. #142
    Celtic_Jewel
    Guest
    Hi, I was wondering, what would you call your grandparents? For instance, I call them Grandma and Grandad, but my cousins all call my Grandma Nana. In a few books, I've read of the grandfather being called 'Pop', but I'm not sure how true that is. The family is in Florida, by the way.

    Any help would be amazing,
    -Ema

  3. #143
    Inverarity
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Jewel
    Hi, I was wondering, what would you call your grandparents? For instance, I call them Grandma and Grandad, but my cousins all call my Grandma Nana. In a few books, I've read of the grandfather being called 'Pop', but I'm not sure how true that is. The family is in Florida, by the way.
    "Pop" is usually used for your father, not your grandfather. But some people call their grandfather "Grandpop."

    It's somewhat regional. Grandma/Grandpa is most common, but Gramma/Grampa is used in some areas (that's really a variant pronunciation rather than a different word, though). Grandfather/Grandmother would be very formal as a way to address your own grandparents. "Gramps" for Grandfather is also sometimes used, though it's very informal/diminutive, and only used if you can get away with being that affectionate (or disrespectful).

    I know some Southerners, but not all, use "Nana" for grandmother. I don't know how common that is.

    One thing you won't hear in the U.S. is "Grandmum." But sometimes "Grandmom."

  4. #144
    Wizengamot Ravenclaw
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    But also, just like Nana is a less common used word, you might also hear Papi for their grandfather.

    And if it helps, Gramma and Grampa is considered somewhat of a Midwestern or rural variant of Grandma and Grandpa. Some families even invent their own words for their grandparents.

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  5. #145
    mahogany_wand
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    Hi, I was wondering, what would you call your grandparents? For instance, I call them Grandma and Grandad, but my cousins all call my Grandma Nana. In a few books, I've read of the grandfather being called 'Pop', but I'm not sure how true that is. The family is in Florida, by the way.
    Personally, I call my grandparents "Grandma" and "Grandpa". I have heard of grandmothers being called Nana, so that's pretty common too. "Pop" was used back in the 18-1900s, although people still use it in the deep south. Not us northerners, though.

    A lot of children make up names for their grandparents, too.

    Hope this helps!

    ~M_W

  6. #146
    padfoot_returns
    Guest
    This thread it up.

    Here is the new one

    xxRiham

    05050505050505050

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